Read 26613 times

  • Aurata
  • Expert Waygook

    • 924

    • July 10, 2016, 09:51:51 pm
    • Korea
    more
"Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« on: August 01, 2016, 07:46:38 pm »
I suppose this may get locked.

Quote
Why Koreans hate foreigners
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03HYerbGiEs&feature=share

Not trolling or putting out clickbait, but here is a video -by a Korean- explaining, in English,  her version of why Koreans don't like foreigners.

I was able to watch it dispassionately. Ultimately it seems kinda sad.

Thoughts?
Imagine your Korea...


  • Loki88
  • Expert Waygook

    • 722

    • July 25, 2014, 08:41:07 am
    • Seoul
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2016, 08:20:58 pm »
I agree with you, sad and ultimately kind of pointless.

She mentioned one of her Korean commenters suggesting she make this video but I can't see a point in it.

'We don't like you because people that look like you did XYZ.  Please understand.'

No real way to respond to that. What possible point could someone have wanted to make with that argument.


Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2016, 08:33:18 pm »
I suppose this may get locked.

Quote
Why Koreans hate foreigners
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03HYerbGiEs&feature=share

Not trolling or putting out clickbait, but here is a video -by a Korean- explaining, in English,  her version of why Koreans don't like foreigners.

I was able to watch it dispassionately. Ultimately it seems kinda sad.

Thoughts?

Yeah, nothing we didn't know already. It was interesting the way towards the end she started complaining about Koreans generalising about other Koreans and it was only at that point she suddenly got the hump.

She finds it difficult to equate the fact that foreigners get 'privilege' in Korea (although that's debatable) in terms of salary/working conditions with the fact that they may have a hard time here and encounter racism on a regular basis. She was obviously pissed off that foreign teachers at her hagwan got paid more than her,while readily accepting that a lot of old Koreans don't want them here. The two things are probably not unrelated. It's not like if hagwans could pay foreigners less they wouldn't because they're privileged white people. the salary and working conditions to a certain extent reflect what foreigners have to put up with here.

The video was sad because it's just highlighting negative traits in humans that we should be striving to eradicate. Generally she was explaining rather than excusing but on one or two occasions it seemed like she was excusing. 

One of the saddest parts was when she was talking about the US military being terrible for having kids and abandoning them and then assuming it was a given that those kids would then be made fun of in Korean society. So they get shat on by both cultures.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2016, 08:39:09 pm by eggieguffer »


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1328

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2016, 09:02:26 pm »
More like a blame US Soldiers video. Korea has a long history, the video maker seems to think Korea's problems started in 1950.


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2016, 09:07:06 pm »
That was a pretty ignorant and inaccurate accounting of history.

Koreans "hatred" of foreigners is far more complex and deliberate than the fairy-tale she was spinning.


  • Aurata
  • Expert Waygook

    • 924

    • July 10, 2016, 09:51:51 pm
    • Korea
    more
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2016, 09:12:12 pm »
while readily accepting that a lot of old Koreans don't want them here.

A lot of Korean women don't seem to realize their newsmedia is run by ajosshis who feel scared at the thought of foreign men dating "their" women.

they're absolute suckers for whatever their media tells them.
Imagine your Korea...


Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2016, 09:14:47 pm »
More like a blame US Soldiers video. Korea has a long history, the video maker seems to think Korea's problems started in 1950.

When Koreans talk about hating 'foreigners' they generally mean non Asians. When they want to talk about their hatred for Chinese or Japanese they usually refer to them by nationality. 'Foreigners' ie Westerners in their eyes only came on the scene during and after the Korean war. That's why she only talked about the military and English teachers.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2016, 09:16:53 pm by eggieguffer »


Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2016, 09:17:36 pm »
It is an interesting perspective coming from a Korean( I am assuming she is Korean)

I was under the impression that Korean teachers in public schools got paid more than Native English Teachers. Am I mistaken?

Also, at my school there is this raise that they get every year which they have to fight for amongst each other. Drama!!

I don't get a damn raise!

She mentioned foreigners getting paid more at "companies" which I can only assume she means hagwons. When I was working at an academy I was getting paid more than my Korean teachers BUT I was working a **** ton more than any other Korean person( less the secretary) at that place.


Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2016, 09:22:46 pm »
It is an interesting perspective coming from a Korean( I am assuming she is Korean)

I was under the impression that Korean teachers in public schools got paid more than Native English Teachers. Am I mistaken?

Also, at my school there is this raise that they get every year which they have to fight for amongst each other. Drama!!

I don't get a damn raise!

She mentioned foreigners getting paid more at "companies" which I can only assume she means hagwons. When I was working at an academy I was getting paid more than my Korean teachers BUT I was working a **** ton more than any other Korean person( less the secretary) at that place.

In the long run with bonuses, raises and perks etc... full time Korean teachers do better at public schools, though a contract teacher might be on less.

Korean hagwan teachers usually earn less than a foreigner for the same amount of work. I assume because the market place dictates it.


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1328

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2016, 09:30:46 pm »
It is an interesting perspective coming from a Korean( I am assuming she is Korean)

I was under the impression that Korean teachers in public schools got paid more than Native English Teachers. Am I mistaken?

Also, at my school there is this raise that they get every year which they have to fight for amongst each other. Drama!!

I don't get a damn raise!

She mentioned foreigners getting paid more at "companies" which I can only assume she means hagwons. When I was working at an academy I was getting paid more than my Korean teachers BUT I was working a **** ton more than any other Korean person( less the secretary) at that place.

In the long run with bonuses, raises and perks etc... full time Korean teachers do better at public schools, though a contract teacher might be on less.

Korean hagwan teachers usually earn less than a foreigner for the same amount of work. I assume because the market place dictates it.

When I worked at a hagwon I earned more but I also graded papers and could teach English without making an error every sentence.

Also lots of the Korean teachers I worked with couldn't have a conversation with a child in English.


  • tomoakleaf
  • Veteran

    • 153

    • September 22, 2012, 03:38:47 pm
    • South Korea
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2016, 09:37:39 pm »
So just give them a reason to like you such as a small gift or do something nice for them.  A small gift goes a long way in any culture.  And don't expect anything in return. 

In addition, just accept and be thankful for the fact that you aren't Asian!  :D


  • Lawrence
  • Super Waygook

    • 305

    • March 06, 2013, 10:59:23 am
    • South Korea
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2016, 09:41:14 pm »
I'm not familiar with this particular Youtuber but it appears she is married to a black man or maybe that is her boyfriend or co-teacher. Anyhow the points she makes aren't anything new to me and I think she was just talking in a "on the surface" type way. She tried to cover herself here and there even though she was a bit ridiculous I think she has some points. It seems like everyone on YouTube tries to speak as fast as they can and they never edit the videos they make, although she did a bit towards the end but anyhow "whatever". What can we do about it? Personally I haven't had bad experiences here. I think it mostly occurs in Seoul, Incheon, and Gyeonggi-do and I think both Koreans and westerners are responsible for it.


Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2016, 09:45:03 pm »
I'm not familiar with this particular Youtuber but it appears she is married to a black man or maybe that is her boyfriend or co-teacher. Anyhow the points she makes aren't anything new to me and I think she was just talking in a "on the surface" type way. She tried to cover herself here and there even though she was a bit ridiculous I think she has some points. It seems like everyone on YouTube tries to speak as fast as they can and they never edit the videos they make, although she did a bit towards the end but anyhow "whatever". What can we do about it? Personally I haven't had bad experiences here. I think it mostly occurs in Seoul, Incheon, and Gyeonggi-do and I think both Koreans and westerners are responsible for it.

I've had mixed experiences. The bad ones come from older Korean guys.


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2016, 09:57:19 pm »
I'm not familiar with this particular Youtuber but it appears she is married to a black man or maybe that is her boyfriend or co-teacher. Anyhow the points she makes aren't anything new to me and I think she was just talking in a "on the surface" type way. She tried to cover herself here and there even though she was a bit ridiculous I think she has some points. It seems like everyone on YouTube tries to speak as fast as they can and they never edit the videos they make, although she did a bit towards the end but anyhow "whatever". What can we do about it? Personally I haven't had bad experiences here. I think it mostly occurs in Seoul, Incheon, and Gyeonggi-do and I think both Koreans and westerners are responsible for it.
Her "points" might be nothing new to you, but they are, in fact, a work of fiction.

The mainstream media in Korea distorted facts, fabricated stories, and intentionally mislead the public.

No matter how many times these stories get retold, it will never make them true, though people come to accept these lies as fact.

 


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4430

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2016, 10:43:30 pm »

She mentioned foreigners getting paid more at "companies" which I can only assume she means hagwons.

Many western engineers, scientists, lawyers, finanance experts, etc. are paid quite a bit more than locals because they have in-demand skills that don't fit the Korean company's "time in service" compensation model (or sometimes they need a Whitey to parade for the clients.)

Construction labour from Bengladesh, not so much.


Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2016, 11:58:59 pm »
Quote
Why Koreans hate foreigners
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03HYerbGiEs&feature=share


Ugh...I really don't know where to start. If you want the tl;dr conclusion, skip to the bottom for it (in bold type).

The opinions and/or observations and implications promulgated in this video are, like everyone said, nothing new and typical of the kind of apologizing for blatant stereotyping and bigotry that is standard among a subset of Koreans and Korean media (I stress - a subset, because many Koreans have far more complicated and realistic views of "foreigners" in their midst). After almost eight years in this country, I've heard all of this before, repeatedly. It worries me a bit that I've become so numb to it.

She seems like a nice woman who probably, if pressed, would be able to talk at length in a more nuanced way about some of the reductive and simplistic ideas about foreigners that some Koreans have (and that she might have). She lives in America now? I am not sure. But, yet, she retains and/or seems to apologize a bit for a lot of the rather typical lopsided, hypocritical views that I find in this country. From her video, I honestly can't tell if she buys some of this nonsense or if she is just "explaining" it to us. I get the feeling that she actually does buy some of it.

As for her talk about foreign teachers, I don't know where she worked as an English teacher, but she fails to mention a few basic and very important differences between the working lives of Korean English teachers and native-speaking English teachers brought in on visas (usually E-2s).

An E-2 (English-teaching) visa, as everyone well knows on this site, is good for only one year, the status of which almost completely depends on the opinions and whims of the employer who sponsored the E-2 and to whom the native-speaking teacher is basically beholden for that time. The E-2 holder cannot just easily quit one job and go get another as any native Korean can (or F-visa type holder). If the employer abuses their trust in any way or shortchanges them, or fails to pay pension, or fires them in the 11th month to avoid paying out any extra money (which does happen, as many posts on this site attest), then the E-2 holder is basically screwed, even if recently there has been some progress on the part of the government in providing avenues of redress. But, in most cases, the E-2 visa holder, often not knowing enough about the language or the legal hurdles to surmount, will usually have to leave the country instead of being able to do what native Koreans are able to do many times - get proper representation and assistance to get their due. Korean citizens can just quit that day and look for another job, or more effectively make an appeal to the administration, the labor board, etc. They might not always win, but they certainly aren't f'n deported. So, that alone is an enormous advantage that being a Korean citizen gives you over being a "foreigner" in the country on an E-2.

As for the slight pay disparity, it really only exists between native-speaking teachers and newer and younger Korean teachers, at least in the public schools. Older Korean teachers in the public school system do just fine, and on the whole, they are paid much more than the native-speaking teachers, as they should be. They have decent cars, decent apartments or houses, and all the retirement benefits that come from working in education in Korea for many years.  Younger Korean teachers are paid less, yes, but will some day become older Korean teachers who have all the benefits and pay of the older teachers. And, as mentioned, by virtue of their citizen status have myriad benefits that foreign teachers often don't - they are more likely to be promoted, be taken seriously by the administration, students, and parents, be generally more respected by the society. They are less likely to be fired without good reason, etc. There is no comparison. Sorry. A slight pay bump for an out-of-country hire as compared to younger Korean teachers? Yes, because it's supply and demand. But that pay advantage quickly fades into the background when you really start comparing benefits between Korean and foreign teachers.

Workload: It's true that, at least in the public school system, Korean teachers (especially younger ones) have a higher workload. And now, let's talk about why and what that means. Whose fault is that? In my experience in the public schools, this was partly due to natural reasons  - the simple language and cultural barrier between the native-speaking English teachers and the staff, schools, and parents. However, there is something that isn't often talked about - There is a palpable fear among many Korean administrations in giving the native-speaking English teachers any meaningful control over their own jobs and working environments for whatever reasons, some ranging from xenophobic notions of foreigners to the in-group mentality of Korean staff, to fear of having the status quo in public English education changed by people who are not Korean.

This obviously varies from school to school, and I know there are some foreign public school teachers who actually are given relatively comparable levels of responsibility and control over their teaching and classrooms, thankfully, especially if they have bilingual sills or a strong educational background.

However, we all know that many Korean public school and private school  administrations prefer younger, less-experienced, often "pretty" or "handsome" foreign English teachers who don't usually have the years of classroom experience needed out of the gate to do a bang-up job the first year or so (as is a natural deficit in any country among younger teachers. Anyone ever heard of learning curve?). They also, not knowing the language or culture, often aren't prepared to deal with or affect the system as it is, so they don't pose a serious threat to the status quo, though some do ask questions and push back (and usually get punished in some way for that).

I've found through years of personal interactions, hearing first-hand accounts, and my own experience that, in most cases, administrators such as principals and vice-principals often prefer hiring inexperienced younger foreign teachers over hiring and older, trained, highly-knowledgeable teachers who might ask questions, want to change things, want to, you know - gasp! - do their jobs well.

Many younger native-speaking English teachers who want similar things are often pushed out when they ask too many questions. I can't tell you how many times I was silenced, ignored, or put on someone's invisible poo-list in the administration due to my daring to simply prioritize my job over weekend hiking and seemingly-mandatory and forced drinking trips with the staff, or if I questioned certain policies I felt diminished my ability to actually teach instead of just putting on a meaningless show for the higher-ups.

I was by no means an outspoken, demanding coworker. I usually kept quiet and tried to focus on doing my job well. Yet, because of a few very normal questions and a literal mere handful of refusals to nearly weekly events, I was somehow blackballed for a while. Thankfully, over time, they came to take me a little more seriously, but it was a long, hard slog through prejudice to that point, and I never really reached any semblance of actual respect or true inclusion no matter how hard I worked, while my Korean counterparts of the same age and teaching experience did get that full respect due. I'm sure many on here have had similar experiences. Much of this (minus the xenophobia) also happens to Korean teachers themselves, so it isn't cordoned off to native-speaking teachers alone.

As well, another reason administrators prefer younger teachers is due in large part to the biases of the parents and the children themselves. They are somehow convinced that English is better learned from a pretty, youthful face, or a clown, than from an actual competent and normal teacher. I can't imagine any other subject being taught this way in the public schools (or even most hakwons), but somehow English education has suffered this fate disproportionately. I would assume this need among some of Korean society to nerf-out  the atmosphere surrounding English (preferring it as a innocuous cartoon of itself) is a subconscious way of managing with the inordinate amount of fear they have of speaking it, or the fear they have of it as a requirement to get university credentials, promotions, etc., or dealing with the foreigners who do speak it. I have no idea.

Thankfully, this is less prevalent when you're teaching at the university level, but on some level it is an ambient reality for native-speaking teachers all over the country.

I don't call any of this a real lasting set of "benefits" for native-speaking teachers over Korean teachers of English. Let's get real.

That's just one area to start. Many of the other things she said seemed to focus on the typical trope of the American GI coming over and having babies and leaving them. Yes, that happened. Sure, there are and were instances of misconduct and bad behavior among troops stationed here. Also, the brothels that were huddled around the early American military bases were real, and, were often condoned by the Korean government itself. Park Chung-hee, the current president's father, actually supposedly encouraged brothels around American military bases to generate revenue for the country. It wasn't as simple as American GIs alone doing all of the misdeeds.

But, what is the actual rate of bad behavior when considered in the context of the true population of American troops over the years in Korea? My guess is the rate of misconduct would be pretty small when viewed juxtaposed to the vast numbers, the tens of thousands of troops who have passed through Korea every decade. That does not excuse in any way any misconduct. I'm as disgusted as anyone when I see new stories of rapes or killings or some kind of violence against local populations perpetrated by American troops. However, because it fits the usual narrative of "bad foreigners sullying our nation", they (some media outlets and some Koreans) blow these stories up larger than they really are when seen against the backdrop of actual history and current reality, and they narrow the focus on foreign culpability while leaving out their own society's or government's part in the problems. As we all know, this exaggeration often extends to the utterly distorted reporting of crime rates among the foreign population, in the media, from police and politicians, etc. When, the reality is, when talking about the vast majority of crime types and overall crime rate, you are, statistically-speaking, far more in danger of being victimized by a native Korean male. This type of hysteria regarding foreign "criminality" is an unacceptable smear against the international residents who live and work here and it must be countered.

Gusts of Popular Feeling constantly reports on these types of distortions in the media:

http://populargusts.blogspot.kr/2013/03/yonhap-reports-on-kic-foreign-crime.html

As for the "mixed babies" who were abandoned, though that's never acceptable when it happened, Korean men have little room to throw stones without pointing out their own problems in that department. Consider, as one example, all of the abandoned children of mixed Korean parentage in The Philippines (the "kopino" children), a problem due mainly to Korean men engaging in sex tourism while overseas. This still goes on.

http://www.soompi.com/2016/01/10/blog-reveals-identities-of-korean-men-who-have-abandoned-kopino-children-in-the-philippines/

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2010/07/113_52887.html

Most fathers of Kopinos are tourists, students and businessmen who visited the Philippines for a short time and then went back to their home country.

About 85 to 90 percent of the mothers of Kopino children work as bar girls or in brothels frequented by foreigners.


So, yes, as reprehensible as it certainly is, men of many cultures and nationalities do this.

I could go on about her supposedly helpful video seemingly straight out of MBC's worst and most bigoted talking points on foreigners, but there's little point. Most people on this website are aware of the hypocrisy, exaggerations, and conscious omissions in these kinds of criticisms.

Do many international residents of Korean need to learn the language and culture? Sure. Are some of their habits different, rude (or perceived as rude) to many Koreans? Yes. Sure.
There are steps we can all take to better acclimate to the environment.

But, as someone who has been here for nearly eight years and is married to a native Korean woman and has tried over time to learn the culture and the language, these kinds of biased, one-sided and somewhat bigoted views of "foreigners" in the eyes of some Koreans that you see in the media and within certain segments of society don't make the ones who are here feel very welcome or fairly-treated.

I am by no means naive enough to believe that moral blindspots like this among Koreans are simply going to disappear because they are wrong or because I'm offended by them. Every society has this type of bigotry and stereotyping of minority groups; and, to give Korea credit, I have seen truly laudable progress in this society's view of foreigners in their midst as more than an "other" to fear or admire or hate or gawk at. It's been wonderful to see that subtle humanization begin to occur with more depth and nuance.

Nonetheless, if she is going to talk about why Koreans supposedly "hate" some foreigners or foreigners in general, she must also confront the sources of that supposed hatred and shine a light on it. She must fact-check and really search for the truth about any problems she mentions, recognizing the exaggerations or results of Korean society's own distortions, fears, self-victimization, and petty biases regarding foreigners, instead of basically laying it all at the doorstep of the faceless, nameless "Joe Waygook" as she seemed to do, all while lecturing us about accepting Korean culture at face value, not asking too many questions about this society's more biased and unfair opinions regarding anyone who isn't Korean. If she doesn't do that, then these "truths" she espouses about how some Koreans view foreigners are very, very hard to take seriously.

I will keep trying to make inroads to the culture despite this. However, this sort of old hat I see from some (thankfully, not all) Koreans has to be called out.



« Last Edit: August 02, 2016, 06:40:49 am by Moe Hay »


  • Zaiterade
  • Super Waygook

    • 250

    • September 08, 2015, 07:36:23 am
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2016, 07:55:36 am »
My biggest issue with the video is her editing. I can understand someone putting a cut after every sentence to show the "best" takes, but this girl is cutting mid sentence, every other word. I know it's nitpicky, but it drove me up the wall.

As for the content, Moe Hay summed it up very well. I've only been here a year and haven't seen everything, but did have to deal with racism with strangers back when me and my ex were together. One of the reasons she broke up with me was because she felt like dating a foreigner was too hard. Heartbreaking, but what can you do?


  • macteacher
  • Expert Waygook

    • 679

    • September 03, 2012, 09:59:00 am
    • south korea
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2016, 08:03:34 am »


I think the video is supposed to be couched from a standpoint of the average korean who may not like foreigners. she's listening the ways in which those feelings stem from.

the big problem is that korea has warded off foreign influence for hundreds of years. it's part of the culture and mythology of this place. i only imagine that the seperating of koreans vs the rest is affirmed everyday in subtle ways. i can't tell you how many times i've been addressed in 반말 by people who shouldn't be using it with me. i think anti foreigner sentiment is way more complicated and intricate than this country likes to pretend



Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2016, 10:29:17 am »


I think the video is supposed to be couched from a standpoint of the average korean who may not like foreigners. she's listening the ways in which those feelings stem from.

Macteacher,

I appreciate your comments. I understand that this is what she said she was doing, and to an extent she was. But, she didn't bother talking about how many (not some) of those types of opinions are very typical, unfair fear-based biases not tempered and/or supported by facts that some Koreans and (worse) media outlets carry and spread. I've been listening to this for eight years, as has my Korean wife (about her relationship with me) and I see right through it.

Had she wanted to really just tell us why some Koreans think this way, that's one thing. But, she ended the video by lecturing some faceless mass of foreigners how to act in Korea and get along without actually talking about the problems and obvious hypocrisies behind those "reasons" that cause some Koreans to supposedly "hate" (an incredibly strong word) foreigners (whoever that's supposed to be - seems she's talking specifically about western English teachers more than anyone) in the first place.

If she wants to present in English to foreign audiences, she needs to do more thinking, soul-searching, and actual research before putting out such a lengthy "explanation" for our supposed benefit... It's a supposedly friendly explanation I personally have heard too many times to apologize for what is essentially bigotry and xenophobic behavior.

It's time that these sorts of attitudes are seen for what they are by Koreans themselves. English teachers (especially lighter skinned ones) obviously do not usually get the worst of it. Foreign workers from poorer Southeast Asian countries or Chinese-Koreans and other groups certainly do. Whatever the case is, Korea, whether they like it or not, is now turning into a multicultural society.

These sorts of one-sided talks to foreign residents that wholly ignore Korean society's blindspots and responsibility for friction between some Koreans and some international residents are not doing anyone any good. They need to be called out for what they are, no matter how friendly the delivery seems to be.

Korea is not a victim any longer, and it's not a "poor, small" country anymore. It's a rich and vibrant player on the international stage compared to the past. It's a change-agent and leader in wider Asian culture. It's important that it starts taking responsibility as a leading Asian nation and cease this silly fear-based, irrational xenophobia.


i think anti foreigner sentiment is way more complicated and intricate than this country likes to pretend

I completely agree with this statement. It certainly is.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2016, 10:46:17 am by Moe Hay »


  • Chester Jim
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1090

    • March 05, 2015, 02:17:12 pm
    • Arkansas
    more
Re: "Why Koreans dislike foreigners"
« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2016, 10:40:13 am »
I felt Korean coworker anger a lot when I worked at academies.   The Korean teachers would use the foreigner and nationalism to get better conditions.  They back their employer into a corner, by essentially asking why are you treating this foreigner specially.  It's a complete scam, because they pretend like the foreign teacher doesn't face obstacles, and that they are not making a giant step down by living in Korea versus their own country.   A lot of the teachers are here for the experience of living in another culture, and the work used to be easy.  Anyways if you think your Korean coworkers are the nice ones and that your boss is the enemy, think again, because,sometimes they are using you.   I even have a Korean American coworker who uses race to get the employer to treat him better ; he's Korean enough to communicate the message.   I could play the game too.  Talk about how I miss my family and how it's so difficult for me to communicate, but it's too much conniving .

Koreans don't hate foreigners.  They hate because of Han which is their ethos to seek revenge and feel bitter at the smallest slight. It's highly incompatible with most societies.    But it makes sense given their history and terrain.   They are a mountainous people without a huge basin. Mountainous people are usually there because they were forced there.  They defended themselves for thousands of years against invasion and cultural extinction.   To say that this started with an american soldier running over a kid on accident is ridiculous. 
Now they are conflicted because after thousands of years they have been handed, and earned, entrance into the largest market in the world, are able to sustain a diet they never would have thought imaginable, let alone have air conditioning and washing machines.   Koreans are facing a choice now.   Give up Han, their hatred, and go back to being near the bottom,  or change and thrive.   Han by the way is actually pretty compatible with communist China.  Mao instructed the Chinese not to be afraid to be bitter.


I don't think that Koreans should follow western culture, but I do feel that as a worker who is providing a skill that they don't have,  I should be allowed to skip the requirement of completely trying to adopt the culture and settle on basic reading and speaking.  I don't plan on making this my home even if they like to fantasize that I am here because it is better.     


The strange thing is that she seems to be feeling a lot of guilt.   Is this what happens when you marry a Korean; they start to listen to radical idiots on the right, because "all Koreans are good people"  Why can't she just write to the guy go ())(*off, or just ignore him as a bigot and an idiot.   Why discuss his perverse narrative?

Did she really only record  "will appreciate" at 11:38and then cut and paste it in the video.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2016, 10:47:48 am by Chester Jim »
Bonzai!