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  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4895

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« on: July 19, 2016, 11:15:32 pm »
Were you pleasantly surprised...or unpleasantly surprised?


  • Somebody
  • Super Waygook

    • 349

    • May 04, 2012, 01:55:20 pm
    • Suwon
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2016, 11:55:10 pm »
I was unpleasantly unsurprised.


  • rhchris1
  • Veteran

    • 187

    • August 05, 2013, 03:27:15 pm
    • Gyeongbuk
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2016, 11:57:54 pm »
In my experience, it depends on the age group (I've taught every age from kindy to adult).  I find that older students (typically elementary 6th grade and up) are better behaved.  Although that could be that they're so beat down by the education system that they just don't have the energy to misbehave.  I've found that younger students don't even listen to what their Korean teachers say. 


  • Aurata
  • Expert Waygook

    • 924

    • July 10, 2016, 09:51:51 pm
    • Korea
    more
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2016, 12:09:50 am »
On average Korean students are not well-behaved.

But then again I have never taught western students. I suspect they're far worse nowadays.
Imagine your Korea...


  • Somebody
  • Super Waygook

    • 349

    • May 04, 2012, 01:55:20 pm
    • Suwon
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2016, 12:12:33 am »
In my experience, it depends on the age group (I've taught every age from kindy to adult).  I find that older students (typically elementary 6th grade and up) are better behaved.  Although that could be that they're so beat down by the education system that they just don't have the energy to misbehave.  I've found that younger students don't even listen to what their Korean teachers say.

It is all grades. High Schoolers tend to be chill in Hagwons. I don't know about their school life. But they have been my favorite students to teach. Actually, it depends on what setting you are teaching them in, is it hagwon or public school? All grades suck when they have lots of their friends around.


  • rhchris1
  • Veteran

    • 187

    • August 05, 2013, 03:27:15 pm
    • Gyeongbuk
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2016, 12:31:39 am »
In my experience, it depends on the age group (I've taught every age from kindy to adult).  I find that older students (typically elementary 6th grade and up) are better behaved.  Although that could be that they're so beat down by the education system that they just don't have the energy to misbehave.  I've found that younger students don't even listen to what their Korean teachers say.

It is all grades. High Schoolers tend to be chill in Hagwons. I don't know about their school life. But they have been my favorite students to teach. Actually, it depends on what setting you are teaching them in, is it hagwon or public school? All grades suck when they have lots of their friends around.

That's probably the case.  I've always worked in hagwons.  My favorites have always been middle 2nd grade and up.  It could be that I've worked in typically small hagwons; I've never had a class that had more than 10 students, so it's always been pretty easy to control.  I've found that if you can somehow relate to the students (for example they all play Overwatch now, as do I, so just mention something about how I play Lucio) it's usually easier to draw them back into the lesson if they start to lose focus. 


  • Somebody
  • Super Waygook

    • 349

    • May 04, 2012, 01:55:20 pm
    • Suwon
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2016, 12:50:41 am »
In my experience, it depends on the age group (I've taught every age from kindy to adult).  I find that older students (typically elementary 6th grade and up) are better behaved.  Although that could be that they're so beat down by the education system that they just don't have the energy to misbehave.  I've found that younger students don't even listen to what their Korean teachers say.

It is all grades. High Schoolers tend to be chill in Hagwons. I don't know about their school life. But they have been my favorite students to teach. Actually, it depends on what setting you are teaching them in, is it hagwon or public school? All grades suck when they have lots of their friends around.

That's probably the case.  I've always worked in hagwons.  My favorites have always been middle 2nd grade and up.  It could be that I've worked in typically small hagwons; I've never had a class that had more than 10 students, so it's always been pretty easy to control.  I've found that if you can somehow relate to the students (for example they all play Overwatch now, as do I, so just mention something about how I play Lucio) it's usually easier to draw them back into the lesson if they start to lose focus.

Yeah I like the older students in that conversation comes into play. It's a useful tool.


  • bjinglee
  • Expert Waygook

    • 545

    • March 10, 2011, 10:29:48 pm
    • South Korea
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2016, 07:33:35 am »
On average Korean students are not well-behaved.

And you have stats to back up this broad statement? While some schools students may not be well behaved, in many schools that's not the case. You can't generalize.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2016, 07:36:52 am by bjinglee »


  • hephoto
  • Waygookin

    • 17

    • April 07, 2016, 01:37:38 pm
    • Daejeon
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2016, 07:46:11 am »
I have taught at the following:

Title 1 low income middle school (USA)
Private Christian High School (USA)
Public Middle School (Korea)
Private International K-12 School (Korea)

I would say, hands down, the Korean middle school boys were the most difficult of the bunch and the International School girls were the best of the bunch.

The big different that I noticed in Korean vs. USA was the participation rate in class.  In my classes in the U.S., even if they didn't enjoy the activity, all students still participated, and there were consequences if they did not.  In Korea, students have no incentive to participate, as they are not graded on this.


  • bjinglee
  • Expert Waygook

    • 545

    • March 10, 2011, 10:29:48 pm
    • South Korea
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2016, 07:53:44 am »
The big different that I noticed in Korean vs. USA was the participation rate in class.  In my classes in the U.S., even if they didn't enjoy the activity, all students still participated, and there were consequences if they did not.  In Korea, students have no incentive to participate, as they are not graded on this.
That depends on the level and your school. A lot of uni classes participation is graded. In some public schools (including my own), participation is graded.


  • Imogen1991
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1109

    • March 18, 2015, 12:26:47 am
    • Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2016, 08:10:26 am »
I couldn't believe the difference when I changed schools in April. My old school was a small, rural-ish school in my city. Hardly any of the students parents could afford to send them to hagwon. Their behaviour was a little bit crazy but they were polite and sweet and never disrespectful. My new school is only about a 20 minute drive from my old one but the difference is like night and day. Many of these kids go to hagwon. Their attitude towards the teachers is absolutely unbelievable. So rude, disrespectful and completely unmotivated.


  • yirj17
  • The Legend

    • 2782

    • September 16, 2015, 02:23:16 am
    • Korealand
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2016, 08:34:06 am »
On average Korean students are not well-behaved.

And you have stats to back up this broad statement? While some schools students may not be well behaved, in many schools that's not the case. You can't generalize.

Yeah, if Aurata had said "in my experience" then I would have accepted the opinion.

All of my students are quite well behaved and polite. Far more well mannered than some of the students I went to school with when I was a kid in a western public school. Some of my peers were little shits, simply put.

Of course this does not mean I expect all [Korean or otherwise] students to be good (my coT has told me stories of a big city school she worked at where fighting was a big issue). But I hardly think they're "on average not well behaved."


  • Aurata
  • Expert Waygook

    • 924

    • July 10, 2016, 09:51:51 pm
    • Korea
    more
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2017, 01:28:57 am »
On average Korean students are not well-behaved.

And you have stats to back up this broad statement? While some schools students may not be well behaved, in many schools that's not the case. You can't generalize.

Yeah, if Aurata had said "in my experience" then I would have accepted the opinion.

All of my students are quite well behaved and polite. Far more well mannered than some of the students I went to school with when I was a kid in a western public school. Some of my peers were little shits, simply put.

Of course this does not mean I expect all [Korean or otherwise] students to be good (my coT has told me stories of a big city school she worked at where fighting was a big issue). But I hardly think they're "on average not well behaved."


That depends on your definition of well-behaved.


You likely received your education from a US school in the 2000's.

In which case you probably think kids bringing guns to school and stabbing their teachers is normal. Sure, Korean students are less violent compared to westerners.


But as any ESLer  knows... in Korea... you have to spend most of your time teaching them the absolute basics of how to behave.
Imagine your Korea...


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4895

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2017, 05:06:18 am »
Generally speaking, the smaller the public school class sizes, the better behaved the students.

Really not sure what the population of my island is but my class sizes are tiny. Like 2 students at the least and 11 students at most. A former island teacher said it might be around 2000, maybe more if you include people who work here but don't actually live here.

On the pro side, I'm happy with small class sizes and teachers have told me that the island kids tend to be much better behaved than city kids they've taught. I like being able to know all my kids by name. If I had classes of 30 or 40 then there's no way I'd remember all those Korean names. The air is clean and the scenery is pretty nice. But none of the beaches are within walking distance.

But I leave nearly every weekend because I crave non-Korean food and that's pretty hard to come by where I live  :cry: And tiny class sizes are sometimes tough because the kids are super shy and can't find strength in numbers.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4895

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2017, 05:09:44 am »
The average number of students per classroom in Korea was 35.7 for elementary schools, the largest of all surveyed OECD countries.

http://www.footprintsrecruiting.com/learn-about-teaching-abroad/country-guides/country/south-korea/korean-classrooms-most-crowded


  • samlktx
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • September 07, 2015, 05:13:45 am
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2017, 08:04:14 am »

That depends on your definition of well-behaved.


You likely received your education from a US school in the 2000's.

In which case you probably think kids bringing guns to school and stabbing their teachers is normal. Sure, Korean students are less violent compared to westerners.


But as any ESLer  knows... in Korea... you have to spend most of your time teaching them the absolute basics of how to behave.

What? I definitely went to school in the US in the 2000s, and I don't know anyone in the American school system at that time who thought that guns and stabbings were normal. All of those events were tragic and devastating.

Aside from that, the behavior seems to vary a lot, even within one grade. Most of my kids are fantastic, but I had one middle school class that drove me crazy. It was really just these two obnoxious students. They weren't throwing or breaking things, but they were really disrespectful in a way I hadn't experienced here before. But that's two teenagers out of hundreds. The rest of my students have been respectful.


Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2017, 08:18:08 am »
Well, for the most part, most of the kids I teach are well-behaved students who enjoy people-pleasing teachers they take a liking to, which was about what I'd expected coming in. What surprised me was how childish or elementary a lot of the "acts of rebellion" I do see from time to time are, especially when coming from older students.

Very tame when compared to what I've personally seen back at home, but also more commonplace and frequent from a larger number of students. I think it's because these acts are so "tame" that a lot of people don't really see them as behavioral issues.

I'd have to say that these kids are definitely more sheltered, which can lead to an attitude of entitlement that plays out in other ways that you wouldn't really see in schools from back where you might have come from. Which, as we all know, is its own frustrating experience for many ESL teachers here, especially for those that get little to no support from their coTs.

Are they better behaved than the kids I grew up with? No, most of the kids I grew up with were mostly good kids, too, you just had those few rotten apples, and even then there were fewer of those rotten apples at home than there are kids here who think it's okay to put their heads down in the middle of class or have full-on conversations while the teacher is still talking. Are they more child-like here? In my experience, yes, and they stay that way for a lot longer, which is why I think that behavioral issues tend to seem more tame to some.

The students here who are more likely to do things that aren't as tame? Tend to get kicked from the schools before things can happen, from what I've seen. I've heard stories of rural schools in certain areas of the country that end up with these types of students because no one else will take them.

That's been my personal experience and observations so far.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2017, 05:22:09 pm by Chinguetti »


  • midori951
  • Veteran

    • 248

    • February 24, 2014, 12:14:59 pm
    • Daegu, South Korea
    more
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2017, 11:11:31 am »
A few classes are lil shits! Rude wont work, wont listen, and no co worker or support from the administration. 

but the most of my classes are great! I love them and I am sad to be changing schools.


  • rowdes
  • Veteran

    • 139

    • June 23, 2010, 02:37:28 pm
    • south korea
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2017, 11:28:22 am »
A huge factor depends on the homeroom teacher of your kids. Having worked in over 6 different elementary schools, I have found that the classes who have a really strict homeroom teacher, tend to be more obedient/well behaved.


  • JahMoo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 639

    • May 11, 2016, 12:55:18 pm
    • Gyeonggi-do, ROK
Re: How would you rate the behavior of your students?
« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2017, 12:10:41 pm »
That depends on your definition of well-behaved.


You likely received your education from a US school in the 2000's.

In which case you probably think kids bringing guns to school and stabbing their teachers is normal. Sure, Korean students are less violent compared to westerners.


But as any ESLer  knows... in Korea... you have to spend most of your time teaching them the absolute basics of how to behave.
1)Where did you come up with this wild scenario? Kids bringing guns to school and stabbing their teachers is rare and newsworthy. Who would see that as "normal"?
2)My Korean elementary kids at one school are super violent, at my other school, they have an intricate sports program, and I find that they are more well-behaved in general. I think the correlation is meaningful, but who knows. I still wouldn't say Korean students are inherently more or less violent than Western students.