Read 4512 times

Cheesemaking/Baking
« on: April 28, 2011, 11:33:51 am »
I've been wanting to get into making cheese and baking, but I'm not sure where to start here. Does anyone have any recipes to share that work well here in Korea? i.e. easy-to-obtain ingredients, materials, etc.


  • julianbuyskes
  • Newgookin

    • 2

    • November 29, 2010, 08:04:40 am
    • Gyeongju, South Korea
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2011, 11:36:37 am »
I am also looking for good and simple recipes for baking. Recently bought a small electric oven and want to put it to use...


  • blondeari
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • September 03, 2010, 12:19:08 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2011, 11:39:16 am »
I just attempted my first at-home cheese making adventure! It actually turned out really well. This is the link for the easiest recipe ever!

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Homemade-Fresh-Cheese/Detail.aspx

It's a mild and soft cheese, a little like cream cheese but better. All you need is milk and vinegar.
If you want to make it flavored (we did caramelized onions and black pepper) just add the ingredients after you drain the cheese.

GOOD LUCK!!


Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2011, 11:46:17 am »
I just attempted my first at-home cheese making adventure! It actually turned out really well. This is the link for the easiest recipe ever!

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Homemade-Fresh-Cheese/Detail.aspx

It's a mild and soft cheese, a little like cream cheese but better. All you need is milk and vinegar.
If you want to make it flavored (we did caramelized onions and black pepper) just add the ingredients after you drain the cheese.

GOOD LUCK!!

This seems easy enough!  :) Did you just use rice vinegar for this recipe?


  • Ley_Druid
  • The Legend

    • 2468

    • February 17, 2011, 08:36:33 am
    • Shinan-Gun, Jeollanam-Do, South Korea
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2011, 12:27:39 pm »
I made this for the people at my school and they loved it... they couldn't stop eating...

Fudge Brownies

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Fudge-Brownies-I/Detail.aspx

You can get everything at homeplus. Make sure you use serious chocolate and no hershy's chocolate. I thought it would be good, but the batch I made with Hershey's came out terrible. I used the homeplus brand chocolate bar that is 150grams. I don't remember exactly what it says, but I think it had ice cream on the front of it and was melting chocolate or something like that. Really great stuff, and cheap!


  • wziller
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • January 03, 2011, 10:37:00 am
    • San Antonio, tx
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2011, 12:30:09 pm »
If you stick with it, you should sell the stuff, because quality baked goods and cheese are hard to find in Korea.


  • anigerla
  • Adventurer

    • 66

    • September 02, 2010, 08:25:18 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2011, 12:31:37 pm »
Do regular Korean stores sell cheesecloth for those of us who live in small towns?  :D


Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2011, 01:00:15 pm »
Ricotta cheese is simple to make and great for lasagna and stuffed shells. Your kids will have a blast making during after school.
Ricotta Cheese
2 quarts milk
1 pint cream
salt to taste
3-4 tbs lemon juice or white wine vinegar

Heat the milk and cream on a high temperature in a large stainless steel pot. Stainless steel works best for this recipe. When the milk//cream concoction starts to agitate (bubbles forming at the top), reduce heat and add your vinegar. Stir gently. After about a minute curdles will be forming in the pot. Pour contents into large colander lined with cheese cloth. I've found cheese cloth at both E-Mart and the local apartment mart. Refrigerate overnight and you have yourself some fresh cheese.
Don't throw away the whey liquid, its a great source of protein and can be used for cake batter or even homemade whey protein shakes. Just dilute with water, blend with some fruit and you have your own homemade post-workout snack.


  • Bry
  • Explorer

    • 9

    • February 21, 2011, 07:03:55 pm
    • Chungbuk, South Korea
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2011, 01:08:51 pm »
If only I had an oven! Lucky...

So far I've baked banana bread and carrot cake in my rice cooker. It's a bit of a pain in the ass in that you have to keep pressing the button down to "cook" because it pops to "warm" after five minutes or so, but it's worth it to me! I have the adapted recipe I used on my (our) blog: http://craigandbry.wordpress.com/2011/03/29/sangdang-n-banana-bread/ I also tried no-bake chocolate chip cookies from the ovenless chef: http://ovenlesschef.blogspot.com/ They were deadly but delicious!

The one thing I can't find is vanilla extract... I bought this really fake tasting stuff that comes in vials from homeplus, and I really limit how much I add because it can be overpowering.

Cheese-making sounds ambitious..


  • katrine
  • Adventurer

    • 55

    • October 01, 2010, 06:13:42 am
    • Gwangju
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2011, 01:22:33 pm »
The one thing I can't find is vanilla extract... I bought this really fake tasting stuff that comes in vials from homeplus, and I really limit how much I add because it can be overpowering.

Vanilla extract is super easy to make! They've got vanilla beans at lots of foreigner stores, and I've seen them at certain E-marts. You need maybe 6 pods. Split them in half, scrap out the seeds and put it in an airtight container (lock and lock is heaven), rough chop the empty pods and throw them in there too. Add in 1 cup of vodka, put the lid on and shake. Store the mixture in a dark place for 4-5 weeks and you have vanilla extract.

Whenever you start to get a little low, you can just add in a little more vodka.


  • bigkirk
  • Waygookin

    • 10

    • October 18, 2010, 07:04:44 am
    • ansan
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2011, 01:34:07 pm »
Watch out, Baking powder is not baking powder here. It is actually bakers ammonia and it makes cakes and muffins smell like gas. Buy the imported baking powder. Another tip is the flour here is actually mixed in with rice flour and does not contain the right gluten levels. Buy white flour from costco and rye flour from gmarket if you want to make a nice wholemeal style loaf. You can also make a nice cheese if you can get hold of kefir grains. This site will tell you every thing you need to know. Another warning is about the milk here, it is Ultra Heat Treated. If you look on the back of the carton you will see the number 135. That is the temp that they heat it to. Homeplus sells a low temp pasteurized milk, it has a yellow top. If you want to make cheese using rennet, then you will need calcium chloride to firm up the curd . It is best to order the food grade stuff from overseas.
Hope this solves some issues.


  • bigkirk
  • Waygookin

    • 10

    • October 18, 2010, 07:04:44 am
    • ansan
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2011, 01:35:19 pm »


  • mintygreen
  • Adventurer

    • 25

    • March 21, 2011, 08:30:47 am
    • South Korea
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2011, 01:40:21 pm »
Do regular Korean stores sell cheesecloth for those of us who live in small towns?  :D

I also live in the tiniest town in Korea and like to make my own cheese so the best substitute for cheesecloth is a bandanna or handkerchief (white is better so that way you don't end up with coloured cheese  :P ).  Also I have a friend in Seoul that uses a scarf ㅋㅋ.  Actually sometimes it's better not to use cheese cloth because the weave is not fine enough...


  • cassie
  • Veteran

    • 132

    • September 10, 2010, 04:37:58 pm
    • Jeollanamdo
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2011, 01:46:34 pm »
           

The one thing I can't find is vanilla extract... I bought this really fake tasting stuff that comes in vials from homeplus, and I really limit how much I add because it can be overpowering.
 
   

You can order vanilla extra online at G-market. Just type in the search in hangeul and it should come up. Search from the English version or Korean version and enter in: "바닐라 익스트랙트" and a Gold Medal brand from the US should be there for 7,000 won.
You can also get it at the foreign food stores in Seoul, or online at www.nicedeli.com


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2011, 01:53:59 pm »
I imported a bread machine and make my own bread.

At first I bought some 100% whole wheat flour, domestic to Korea, but it is not very good. Well, the taste is good, its just that it could be much better. Next up, I will be buying some Bobs Red Mill and using that instead.


Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2011, 02:22:13 pm »
I'm very interested in knowing if anyone can recommend the best flour brands or places to buy imported flour here. I used to make bread a lot back home, and I'll be leading a science camp this summer to make challah. I want to make sure the bread turns out well, so I need reliable flour!


  • Robotka
  • Veteran

    • 176

    • October 05, 2010, 01:05:29 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2011, 02:56:26 pm »
For cheese making, I use what I believe is a cloth steaming bag, which I got at E-mart in the cooking section.  It works perfectly for soft cheese.  I haven't tried hard cheese, since you need rennet and/or other cheese starters and it sounds really complicated.  Also, the cheese at Costco is both affordable and yummy, so, as long as I make the trek there regularly, I'm well stocked!

I found vanilla and almost every other kitchen spice or ingredient in Itaewon at the Foreign Mart.  They also have the giant blocks of cheese from Costco, for a slight markup (if you don't want to bother going to Costco or don't have a membership).  You can get there from Exit 3 of Itaewon Station.  Go straight out the exit, then turn right at the next intersection.  Go up the hill a little ways and it's on the left (past the affiliated Foreign Restaurant, also on the left). 

Anything you can't find locally or on Gmarket, try asking a friendly Korean teacher to help you find it on other Korean websites.  One of the teachers I work with ordered a whole bunch of baking ingredients for after school class last year, from this website: http://www.bakingnara.co.kr/main/main.php (I haven't looked at it myself, since I don't know Korean).

Good luck!


  • bigkirk
  • Waygookin

    • 10

    • October 18, 2010, 07:04:44 am
    • ansan
Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2011, 03:03:17 pm »
Use a 100% white cotton pillowcase for straining. Afterwards to press the cheese curds in some cheese cloth and put it in a smallish bamboo steamer. Put something really heavy on top such as a bucket full of water. Leave it for a day or so and put it in some salt water and you have feta cheese.


Re: Cheesemaking/Baking
« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2011, 03:34:24 pm »
I find using a Dumpling cloth as effective as a cheese cloth. I got mine from Emart. Also I have lots of muslin at home so I used some of that!
There are lots of home baking sites on the net so it's easy to find everything you need. Well almost everything!