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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8180 on: June 07, 2018, 01:29:34 pm »
Turned out, we were sold out of her favorite brand of cigarettes, and she had been going spaztic at all our employees over that. :\

When I feel like someone is acting irrationally towards me, I try to remind myself that the person's cigarettes might have been sold out, and I find that helps me respond with a little more sympathy. It's important to consider what others might be going through.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8181 on: June 07, 2018, 01:56:22 pm »
Is it normal for Korean shops to not let you try on clothes? Some native teachers and I went to a Korean clothing store but weren't allowed to try on clothes even though there were 2 changing rooms there one of which was free.  :sad:

Is this a common occurrence? Has anyone faced something similar?

One of my friends obviously got very upset with this and rightly so! We went out of there and spent our money elsewhere!

Yeah, it always happens to me at those smaller Korean-owned places. Bigger retailers like Lotte won't usually care though.

I just get around it by playing the "dumb foreigner" card and just going to the change room anyways, trying on the shirt without them asking, haha. I don't wear any make up and by the time they notice I've already tried it on  :rolleyes:

Wait - is this actually a common thing? I've been told I can't try something on exactly three times in eight years, and in two of those cases I realized there was a sign saying that I couldn't try on that thing, after I asked.

That seems really frustrating.

I'm so confused though about all this. Why even have changing rooms if you won't allow people to use them??

They're for Korean customers to use.


  • Kaynadian
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    • August 27, 2015, 07:54:56 am
    • Taebaek
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8182 on: June 07, 2018, 02:06:18 pm »
Is it normal for Korean shops to not let you try on clothes? Some native teachers and I went to a Korean clothing store but weren't allowed to try on clothes even though there were 2 changing rooms there one of which was free.  :sad:

Is this a common occurrence? Has anyone faced something similar?

One of my friends obviously got very upset with this and rightly so! We went out of there and spent our money elsewhere!

Yeah, it always happens to me at those smaller Korean-owned places. Bigger retailers like Lotte won't usually care though.

I just get around it by playing the "dumb foreigner" card and just going to the change room anyways, trying on the shirt without them asking, haha. I don't wear any make up and by the time they notice I've already tried it on  :rolleyes:

Wait - is this actually a common thing? I've been told I can't try something on exactly three times in eight years, and in two of those cases I realized there was a sign saying that I couldn't try on that thing, after I asked.

That seems really frustrating.

I'm so confused though about all this. Why even have changing rooms if you won't allow people to use them??

Oh they are used by Koreans. I was the only foreigner in line and everyone in front of me got to try on the clothes.


  • JNM
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    • 4350

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8183 on: June 07, 2018, 02:13:00 pm »
Is it normal for Korean shops to not let you try on clothes? Some native teachers and I went to a Korean clothing store but weren't allowed to try on clothes even though there were 2 changing rooms there one of which was free.  :sad:

Is this a common occurrence? Has anyone faced something similar?

One of my friends obviously got very upset with this and rightly so! We went out of there and spent our money elsewhere!

Yeah, it always happens to me at those smaller Korean-owned places. Bigger retailers like Lotte won't usually care though.

I just get around it by playing the "dumb foreigner" card and just going to the change room anyways, trying on the shirt without them asking, haha. I don't wear any make up and by the time they notice I've already tried it on  :rolleyes:

Wait - is this actually a common thing? I've been told I can't try something on exactly three times in eight years, and in two of those cases I realized there was a sign saying that I couldn't try on that thing, after I asked.

That seems really frustrating.

I'm so confused though about all this. Why even have changing rooms if you won't allow people to use them??

Oh they are used by Koreans. I was the only foreigner in line and everyone in front of me got to try on the clothes.

That's when I would make a big scene and take out my wallet, count out a few hundred thousand, fold it, put it in my shirt pocket, tap it, and shake my finger saying, "obsoyo manwan!"



Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8184 on: June 07, 2018, 02:27:45 pm »
Is it normal for Korean shops to not let you try on clothes? Some native teachers and I went to a Korean clothing store but weren't allowed to try on clothes even though there were 2 changing rooms there one of which was free.  :sad:

Is this a common occurrence? Has anyone faced something similar?

One of my friends obviously got very upset with this and rightly so! We went out of there and spent our money elsewhere!

Yeah, it always happens to me at those smaller Korean-owned places. Bigger retailers like Lotte won't usually care though.

I just get around it by playing the "dumb foreigner" card and just going to the change room anyways, trying on the shirt without them asking, haha. I don't wear any make up and by the time they notice I've already tried it on  :rolleyes:

Wait - is this actually a common thing? I've been told I can't try something on exactly three times in eight years, and in two of those cases I realized there was a sign saying that I couldn't try on that thing, after I asked.

That seems really frustrating.

I'm so confused though about all this. Why even have changing rooms if you won't allow people to use them??

Oh they are used by Koreans. I was the only foreigner in line and everyone in front of me got to try on the clothes.

That's when I would make a big scene and take out my wallet, count out a few hundred thousand, fold it, put it in my shirt pocket, tap it, and shake my finger saying, "obsoyo manwan!"

Jokes aside, she should have made a scene. I believe on calling Koreans out on their xenophobia.


  • JNM
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    • 4350

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8185 on: June 07, 2018, 02:29:16 pm »
Is it normal for Korean shops to not let you try on clothes? Some native teachers and I went to a Korean clothing store but weren't allowed to try on clothes even though there were 2 changing rooms there one of which was free.  :sad:

Is this a common occurrence? Has anyone faced something similar?

One of my friends obviously got very upset with this and rightly so! We went out of there and spent our money elsewhere!

Yeah, it always happens to me at those smaller Korean-owned places. Bigger retailers like Lotte won't usually care though.

I just get around it by playing the "dumb foreigner" card and just going to the change room anyways, trying on the shirt without them asking, haha. I don't wear any make up and by the time they notice I've already tried it on  :rolleyes:

Wait - is this actually a common thing? I've been told I can't try something on exactly three times in eight years, and in two of those cases I realized there was a sign saying that I couldn't try on that thing, after I asked.

That seems really frustrating.

I'm so confused though about all this. Why even have changing rooms if you won't allow people to use them??

Oh they are used by Koreans. I was the only foreigner in line and everyone in front of me got to try on the clothes.

That's when I would make a big scene and take out my wallet, count out a few hundred thousand, fold it, put it in my shirt pocket, tap it, and shake my finger saying, "obsoyo manwan!"

Jokes aside, she should have made a scene. I believe on calling Koreans out on their xenophobia.

I wasn't joking.


  • JVPrice
  • Expert Waygook

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    • August 29, 2017, 10:26:13 am
    • Tampa, FL
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8186 on: June 07, 2018, 03:04:36 pm »
My CT at my second school wants me to make my classes more difficult in order to motivate the students (these students are very much low-level mind you). I'm trying to tell her that they don't have motivation to begin with. Making it harder for the sake of "challenge" won't change a thing, especially when there isn't much consequence for not trying. Even games don't motivate a lot of these kids.

I'm curious as to what you guys think. Should I try to challenge the kids, or keep doing as I do? I'm not afraid to disagree with my CT, she's new to this school and I'm close to the Principal so there's not much worry there.
The World Ends With You


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8187 on: June 07, 2018, 03:07:58 pm »
Is it normal for Korean shops to not let you try on clothes? Some native teachers and I went to a Korean clothing store but weren't allowed to try on clothes even though there were 2 changing rooms there one of which was free.  :sad:

Is this a common occurrence? Has anyone faced something similar?

One of my friends obviously got very upset with this and rightly so! We went out of there and spent our money elsewhere!

Yeah, it always happens to me at those smaller Korean-owned places. Bigger retailers like Lotte won't usually care though.

I just get around it by playing the "dumb foreigner" card and just going to the change room anyways, trying on the shirt without them asking, haha. I don't wear any make up and by the time they notice I've already tried it on  :rolleyes:

Wait - is this actually a common thing? I've been told I can't try something on exactly three times in eight years, and in two of those cases I realized there was a sign saying that I couldn't try on that thing, after I asked.

That seems really frustrating.

I'm so confused though about all this. Why even have changing rooms if you won't allow people to use them??

Oh they are used by Koreans. I was the only foreigner in line and everyone in front of me got to try on the clothes.

That's when I would make a big scene and take out my wallet, count out a few hundred thousand, fold it, put it in my shirt pocket, tap it, and shake my finger saying, "obsoyo manwan!"

Jokes aside, she should have made a scene. I believe on calling Koreans out on their xenophobia.

I wasn't joking.

I woukd just drop everything on the floor and say goodbye and walk out.


  • eujunseo
  • Veteran

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    • April 06, 2018, 10:53:01 pm
    • United Kingdom
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8188 on: June 07, 2018, 03:09:30 pm »
My CT at my second school wants me to make my classes more difficult in order to motivate the students (these students are very much low-level mind you). I'm trying to tell her that they don't have motivation to begin with. Making it harder for the sake of "challenge" won't change a thing, especially when there isn't much consequence for not trying. Even games don't motivate a lot of these kids.

I'm curious as to what you guys think. Should I try to challenge the kids, or keep doing as I do? I'm not afraid to disagree with my CT, she's new to this school and I'm close to the Principal so there's not much worry there.

If amazing game templates from waygook.org doesn't motivate them, I'd say keep doing as you do.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8189 on: June 07, 2018, 03:13:33 pm »
My CT at my second school wants me to make my classes more difficult in order to motivate the students (these students are very much low-level mind you). I'm trying to tell her that they don't have motivation to begin with. Making it harder for the sake of "challenge" won't change a thing, especially when there isn't much consequence for not trying. Even games don't motivate a lot of these kids.

I'm curious as to what you guys think. Should I try to challenge the kids, or keep doing as I do? I'm not afraid to disagree with my CT, she's new to this school and I'm close to the Principal so there's not much worry there.

Definitely challenge your students. You can challenge students with things that aren't games. Consider throwing them some easy questions using vocabulary that they have studied or learned, but formulated in new ways. Constant games aren't always the best motivator, especially if they're confusing and require lots of explanation, which some games do.

Don't try to pander to their interests too much, but also don't underestimate the power of a question that's within their capacity to understand. If there's one thing almost all people like, including students, it's to talk about themselves.

Finding the sweet spot of not dead-easy and not too difficult is the hard part, though. Don't aim for something they don't know. Aim for something they already know, but have to put a tiny bit of brain power into answering.

Also, as an aside, regarding 'being close with the principal' and not having to worry about your co-teacher says about you - I believe you said this is your second semester teaching EFL in Korea. In most cases, that's not really long enough to be feeling quite that secure. And never underestimate the potential of a complaining coteacher to make your life difficult. It's always a possibility, especially for new native teachers.


  • Pennypie
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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8190 on: June 08, 2018, 07:20:31 am »
My CT at my second school wants me to make my classes more difficult in order to motivate the students (these students are very much low-level mind you). I'm trying to tell her that they don't have motivation to begin with. Making it harder for the sake of "challenge" won't change a thing, especially when there isn't much consequence for not trying. Even games don't motivate a lot of these kids.

I'm curious as to what you guys think. Should I try to challenge the kids, or keep doing as I do? I'm not afraid to disagree with my CT, she's new to this school and I'm close to the Principal so there's not much worry there.

Definitely challenge your students. You can challenge students with things that aren't games. Consider throwing them some easy questions using vocabulary that they have studied or learned, but formulated in new ways. Constant games aren't always the best motivator, especially if they're confusing and require lots of explanation, which some games do.

Don't try to pander to their interests too much, but also don't underestimate the power of a question that's within their capacity to understand. If there's one thing almost all people like, including students, it's to talk about themselves.

Finding the sweet spot of not dead-easy and not too difficult is the hard part, though. Don't aim for something they don't know. Aim for something they already know, but have to put a tiny bit of brain power into answering.

Also, as an aside, regarding 'being close with the principal' and not having to worry about your co-teacher says about you - I believe you said this is your second semester teaching EFL in Korea. In most cases, that's not really long enough to be feeling quite that secure. And never underestimate the potential of a complaining coteacher to make your life difficult. It's always a possibility, especially for new native teachers.

I agree.

Honestly you need to actually work at it. Throwing a few games at them and making it easy isn't going to motivate them.

I've had tough students in the past and sometimes all they need is a positive encouragement and something they enjoy. There are students who don't care and will never care, that's fine. Leave them be.

You can't force them to enjoy it and if they're doing the bare minimum then it's enough. If they aren't that's their choice.

If they are being disruptive then that's another thing entirely and there are many other strategies for classroom management. Punishment isn't a good motivator, do you want the students to do the work just because they are worried about being punished?

You seem like you resent your co teacher asking you to motivate the students, maybe she knows more than you? Maybe this is what the students have told her? You're close to the principal? So what? He doesn't work with you on a day to day basis.

They key is to challenge them in a way that it appears like a challenge but it isn't really. As Based said, using vocabulary they may already know but present in a way that seems as if it is new.

 My students love puzzles, rebus riddles, "missions" where they complete challenges around the classroom at their own pace. I gear them towards their levels, with things available for all English levels. I've tried to cut down on teacher talking time as much as possible and if it takes more than a few minutes to explain then I don't do it.

Have you tried asking them what they like? or what they would like to do? Whip up a survey and ask the co teacher to translate it for you, or keep it basic.

Since they're already demotivated and as you said, games don't work on some of them, why not try something new? If your classes aren't working enough that she felt compelled to say something (Which is rare, I've never been able to get much feedback so you're kinda lucky) then it's nonsensical to keep doing the same old thing.


  • JVPrice
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    • August 29, 2017, 10:26:13 am
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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8191 on: June 08, 2018, 07:34:50 am »
My CT at my second school wants me to make my classes more difficult in order to motivate the students (these students are very much low-level mind you). I'm trying to tell her that they don't have motivation to begin with. Making it harder for the sake of "challenge" won't change a thing, especially when there isn't much consequence for not trying. Even games don't motivate a lot of these kids.

I'm curious as to what you guys think. Should I try to challenge the kids, or keep doing as I do? I'm not afraid to disagree with my CT, she's new to this school and I'm close to the Principal so there's not much worry there.

Definitely challenge your students. You can challenge students with things that aren't games. Consider throwing them some easy questions using vocabulary that they have studied or learned, but formulated in new ways. Constant games aren't always the best motivator, especially if they're confusing and require lots of explanation, which some games do.

Don't try to pander to their interests too much, but also don't underestimate the power of a question that's within their capacity to understand. If there's one thing almost all people like, including students, it's to talk about themselves.

Finding the sweet spot of not dead-easy and not too difficult is the hard part, though. Don't aim for something they don't know. Aim for something they already know, but have to put a tiny bit of brain power into answering.

Also, as an aside, regarding 'being close with the principal' and not having to worry about your co-teacher says about you - I believe you said this is your second semester teaching EFL in Korea. In most cases, that's not really long enough to be feeling quite that secure. And never underestimate the potential of a complaining coteacher to make your life difficult. It's always a possibility, especially for new native teachers.

I agree.

Honestly you need to actually work at it. Throwing a few games at them and making it easy isn't going to motivate them.

I've had tough students in the past and sometimes all they need is a positive encouragement and something they enjoy. There are students who don't care and will never care, that's fine. Leave them be.

You can't force them to enjoy it and if they're doing the bare minimum then it's enough. If they aren't that's their choice.

If they are being disruptive then that's another thing entirely and there are many other strategies for classroom management. Punishment isn't a good motivator, do you want the students to do the work just because they are worried about being punished?

You seem like you resent your co teacher asking you to motivate the students, maybe she knows more than you? Maybe this is what the students have told her? You're close to the principal? So what? He doesn't work with you on a day to day basis.

They key is to challenge them in a way that it appears like a challenge but it isn't really. As Based said, using vocabulary they may already know but present in a way that seems as if it is new.

 My students love puzzles, rebus riddles, "missions" where they complete challenges around the classroom at their own pace. I gear them towards their levels, with things available for all English levels. I've tried to cut down on teacher talking time as much as possible and if it takes more than a few minutes to explain then I don't do it.

Have you tried asking them what they like? or what they would like to do? Whip up a survey and ask the co teacher to translate it for you, or keep it basic.

Since they're already demotivated and as you said, games don't work on some of them, why not try something new? If your classes aren't working enough that she felt compelled to say something (Which is rare, I've never been able to get much feedback so you're kinda lucky) then it's nonsensical to keep doing the same old thing.

As I said in the beginning, it's just a huge worry for me because they are low-level. I don't resent my co-teacher, and maybe it's just miscommunication, but the way she wanted me to change it sounded like it wouldn't have much effect. I do like your ideas, and I'll see if I can make it work next semester. Speaking tests are around the corner, so it's pretty late to really make this happen right away. 
The World Ends With You


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8192 on: June 08, 2018, 07:49:06 am »
I second the rebus puzzles and missions, anything they have to actually sit down and think it through, really. My students are very low level too, and they love these. Sometimes we'll have to throw in a Korean word to help them along, but they go crazy for them. Even my lowest level and least participatory students will take the lead in figuring them out. Especially for older students (5th and 6th grade elementary, all of middle), you have to give them things to figure out. You might be able to get away with a *short* 4-corners/find your team game if they're really restless. But I've found they much prefer action reading or sparkle die at the beginning of class really and it really settles even my most restless students.

I also try to check in with my students around the midpoint of the semester with a quick anonymous feedback survey (I ask about classroom pacing, do they feel like they are learning something, confidence with understanding and speaking English, favorite activities, something they would like to change). My coteacher translates the survey into Korean, and we give them like 5 minutes at the beginning of class to do it. Then I lead a review class while my coteacher compiles the survey results in the back of the classroom. We emphasize that we are looking for feedback, and we will not implement every suggestion. And, honestly, unless a majority of students have the same feedback (they don't like this activity, Tadpole Teacher talks too fast, I didn't understand this lesson), we don't really change much. But sometimes it reveals some stuff about the classroom dynamic that we didn't know previously, and we can adjust as needed.


  • zola
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    • September 30, 2012, 06:56:11 am
    • Korea
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8193 on: June 08, 2018, 10:55:13 am »
People using the word "hacks" or "life hacks". Or just general lite journalism's use of douche language.

Learn these 15 life hacks - it's always obvious or pointless shit. "Fold you atm receipts into 4s. Now it's smaller and takes up less wallet space!"

You've been making your bed ALL wrong

Vietnam celebrates new year in February....and it's AMAZING

As someone else once put it, the Buzzfeedication of journalism. I see it in legitimate newspapers now.
Kpip! - Martin 2018


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4350

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8194 on: June 08, 2018, 11:02:50 am »
People using the word "hacks" or "life hacks". Or just general lite journalism's use of douche language.

Learn these 15 life hacks - it's always obvious or pointless shit. "Fold you atm receipts into 4s. Now it's smaller and takes up less wallet space!"

You've been making your bed ALL wrong

Vietnam celebrates new year in February....and it's AMAZING

As someone else once put it, the Buzzfeedication of journalism. I see it in legitimate newspapers now.
To be fair, Vietnamese New Year is awesome.


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5642

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8195 on: June 08, 2018, 11:11:42 am »
To be fair, Vietnamese New Year is awesome.
Now that's using your tÍte.
레새 뭐 페르, 커나르드. 에스티 타베르낰 트루 드 볘르즈.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8196 on: June 08, 2018, 12:02:17 pm »
To be fair, Vietnamese New Year is awesome.
Now that's using your tÍte.

That's offensive.


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4350

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8197 on: June 08, 2018, 12:03:22 pm »
To be fair, Vietnamese New Year is awesome.
Now that's using your tÍte.
Trying not to be offensive.


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

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    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8198 on: June 08, 2018, 12:35:49 pm »
I knew someone would come in with that line. You don't disappoint.
레새 뭐 페르, 커나르드. 에스티 타베르낰 트루 드 볘르즈.


  • JNM
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    • 4350

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #8199 on: June 10, 2018, 01:18:57 pm »
Does anybody really understand the Sunday shop closing rules?

In Anyang today we couldn't find fried chicken for lunch, but lots of BBQ places to choose from.

[Shrug]