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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12580 on: October 29, 2020, 07:51:26 am »
IM SO SICK of my coteacher getting hog wild because I tell her her words hurt me.......  She gets hurt NOT cause she hurt me, only cause I TOLD her she hurt me.. and that made her feel embarrassed.  I've encountered this bullshit time and again with Korean women.  It's weird as hell.   My ex-girlfriend would do the same thing and yuck......I don't even know how to deal with it....

hog wild?

Anyways, I'm not condoning Korean social culture, I too think it's archaic and BS, I'm just going to do my best to explain it.

Even if your CT said something hurtful, by telling her that what she said hurt your feelings, you've become the architect of a now awkward situation. According to Korean logic, you're now at fault. Furthermore, she considers herself your senior making it even more of a faux pas.

The Korean way is for you to ignore what she said, particularly if she's your senior. Even if someone is at fault, calling them out causes them to lose face and "breaks the harmony" thus, you are the one at fault. Things are changing in the sense that it seems more acceptable to call someone out for bad behaviour in public, however, social interactions seem to be more traditional.

It's absolutely ridiculous, I know. How would Ideal with it? Be more selective as to who you allow into your circle. If it's a work colleague, keep things professional, polite and cordial, but don't get too personal.

Alternatively, could you just be too sensitive? I'm just entertaining the possibility as I've never had a CT say anything nasty to me in years.


  • 745sticky
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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12581 on: October 29, 2020, 09:18:01 am »
I'm just entertaining the possibility as I've never had a CT say anything nasty to me in years.

Careful Aristocrat, you're slipping into the "if it doesn't happen to me it doesn't happen" territory certain posters here occupy  :P


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12582 on: October 29, 2020, 10:07:11 am »
hog wild?

Southern U.S. colloquialism for "crazy" or "out of control." Especially in Texas where the wild hogs are really taking over and causing all kinds of problems, haha.


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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12583 on: October 29, 2020, 10:18:45 am »
Southern U.S. colloquialism for "crazy" or "out of control." Especially in Texas where the wild hogs are really taking over and causing all kinds of problems, haha.

Pretty sure "hog wild" is the name of a level on Crash Bandicoot 1. :P


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12584 on: October 29, 2020, 10:49:10 am »
Pretty sure "hog wild" is the name of a level on Crash Bandicoot 1. :P

I still say “Booyah Grandma” in fits of excitement.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12585 on: October 29, 2020, 11:04:17 am »


Meanwhile, I can't seem to master keeping my coffee in my cup. I can literally drink anything else at a full sprint without spilling a drop, but when it's coffee it's going to end up on my shirt or on some papers.


  • OnNut81
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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12586 on: October 29, 2020, 11:33:19 am »
Southern U.S. colloquialism for "crazy" or "out of control." Especially in Texas where the wild hogs are really taking over and causing all kinds of problems, haha.

I grew up in Toronto and that was a common expression, although it's "going hog wild" as opposed to "getting hog wild" for me.  It's not a Southern U.S. colloquialism only. 


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12587 on: October 29, 2020, 12:02:06 pm »
I grew up in Toronto and that was a common expression, although it's "going hog wild" as opposed to "getting hog wild" for me.  It's not a Southern U.S. colloquialism only. 

The term originates from the South U.S., but it's interesting that it's commonly used in Canada, too. It's not something I can picture a Canadian saying, lmao.


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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12588 on: October 29, 2020, 12:13:52 pm »
The term originates from the South U.S., but it's interesting that it's commonly used in Canada, too. It's not something I can picture a Canadian saying, lmao.

Where are you getting that it was a term that originated in the Southern U.S.?  Hogs is not a southern U.S. term or even an American one. It's from British English.  Hogs go wild when someone throws them feed is how I would guess it originally came about.  We have plenty of hogs in Canada as well.  One of the nicknames for Toronto has long been Hogtown. 
« Last Edit: October 29, 2020, 12:17:33 pm by OnNut81 »


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12589 on: October 29, 2020, 12:30:38 pm »
Where are you getting that it was a term that originated in the Southern U.S.?  Hogs is not a southern U.S. term.  Hogs go wild when someone throws them feed which is how I would guess it originally came about, but we have plenty of hogs in Canada as well.  One of the nicknames for Toronto has long been Hogtown. 

Not the word "hog" by itself, and not the word "wild" by itself. "Hog wild," as a term used to describe certain behaviors and conditions that aren't limited to just hogs.

I understand that it's a term that is understood and used by other countries and cultures because of sharing of the same language and dealing with a lot of the same issues, but it's listed as American English in origin. The term was first printed in 1905 in Arkansas, but it's also believed to have been widely used in the USA before then, since the late 1800s.

But I'm not an epistemology linguistics expert. I just google, like most everyone else.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2020, 02:30:00 pm by Chinguetti »


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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12590 on: October 29, 2020, 12:31:15 pm »
According to etymonline, the term "hog-wild" is an Americanism dating from 1904.
https://www.etymonline.com/word/hog

Obviously the words themselves predate the expression, and are, as mentioned, ye olde English.
Interestingly, why "going hog-wild" means "to become crazy with excitement" is no longer really known.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12591 on: October 29, 2020, 12:50:09 pm »
I'm not an epistemology linguistics expert.

Does sound like a fun gig though!

Interestingly, why "going hog-wild" means "to become crazy with excitement" is no longer really known.

OnNut’s theory sounds viable.


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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12592 on: October 29, 2020, 01:05:32 pm »
Yeah, sounds pretty reasonable. Although, I think if that were the case, we ought to rename it "going middle-school boys wild".  :laugh:


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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12593 on: October 29, 2020, 01:08:56 pm »
As a Canadian who spent his first 22 years on the West coast, "hog" was used to describe motorcycles of a certain ilk.

"Hog wild"? Uh,... no.

Of course i never saw a live pig until i went to another province (Alberta). Cattle (for beef) and fish (salmon & trout) lived locally.


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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12594 on: October 29, 2020, 01:21:56 pm »


Meanwhile, I can't seem to master keeping my coffee in my cup. I can literally drink anything else at a full sprint without spilling a drop, but when it's coffee it's going to end up on my shirt or on some papers.

That's the level! :D
Oh damn, I hope you at least let it cool a bit first so it doesn't burn you!


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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12595 on: October 29, 2020, 01:23:08 pm »
The term originates from the South U.S., but it's interesting that it's commonly used in Canada, too. It's not something I can picture a Canadian saying, lmao.

We had the term in NZ too but, wasn't too common, though you'd hear it from time to time.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12596 on: October 29, 2020, 02:53:34 pm »
I mean, unique colloquialisms and idioms have developed to describe similar things, from country to country and from region to region, even if they share the same language, and it's not really a crazy concept that these things end up transferring or being adopted simply because they just make sense to everyone, while certain other ones just don't. Immigration, close borders, mass media, entertainment. It happens.

Take "dish soap" for example. Both British and American English use the word "soap," but you won't really hear a British person call their washing up liquid "dish soap" unless they've lived in the US and, I assume, Canada for a time (do Canadians call it dish soap, too, or do you call it something else?) because, to them, it doesn't make much sense. Because soap is supposed to be a solid and not a liquid, haha. And Americans aren't really ever going to call a cookie a biscuit because biscuits aren't supposed to be sweet or flat.

I personally find it really interesting to compare notes.

We had the term in NZ too but, wasn't too common, though you'd hear it from time to time.

Does NZ have a similar term that's more common to use?


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Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12597 on: October 29, 2020, 03:19:59 pm »
I mean, unique colloquialisms and idioms have developed to describe similar things, from country to country and from region to region, even if they share the same language, and it's not really a crazy concept that these things end up transferring or being adopted simply because they just make sense to everyone, while certain other ones just don't. Immigration, close borders, mass media, entertainment. It happens.

Take "dish soap" for example. Both British and American English use the word "soap," but you won't really hear a British person call their washing up liquid "dish soap" unless they've lived in the US and, I assume, Canada for a time (do Canadians call it dish soap, too, or do you call it something else?) because, to them, it doesn't make much sense. Because soap is supposed to be a solid and not a liquid, haha. And Americans aren't really ever going to call a cookie a biscuit because biscuits aren't supposed to be sweet or flat.

I personally find it really interesting to compare notes.

Does NZ have a similar term that's more common to use?

I don't remember a different one instead of "hog wild" - but we call dish soap 'detergent' in NZ, dish soap was uncommon. :o
I've never heard dish soap be called regular soap haha.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12598 on: October 29, 2020, 04:44:03 pm »
There is always one kid who ruins it for everyone.  Last year I spend quit a bit of time putting together a choose your own adventure for halloween. I used it in 3rd and 4th grade and was very careful to make it spooky but not really scary. All the ghosts and monsters were cartoonish, there was no blood and no jump scares. All the students seemed to enjoy it...except for one. There was one boy in 4th grade who spent the whole class with his head on his desk, his eyes clenched shut and his hands over his ears.  I thought it was weird but I guess some kids just have a lower tolerance for that sort of thing. Fair enough.  He has since taken it to another level. I tried to play a dungeon runner game  i found on here with his class. There aren't even any monsters in that game. The students just have to remember a series of directions. If they choose the wrong route, they come to a dead end. That's it. As soon as I put it on he starts yelling "No, no, no!" and tries to take my usb out of the computer. I explain to him there are no monsters. My coteacher also explains. He starts crying and I have to abandon the game.  Now he is in grade five. Today I played a hangman alternative I whipped up. It's just a guy chewing bubble gum. If the students guess wrong he blows a bubble that gets bigger until it eventually pops. He immediately starts freaking out yelling and crying.
I have had several conversations with my CoT about him. He does not have any behavioral problems and is actually one of the best students in the class.  I guess his class will not play anymore games.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #12599 on: October 29, 2020, 04:54:31 pm »
There is always one kid who ruins it for everyone....

Sounds like he's been coddled by his parents to the point that it's perverse.

And here's me playing this to a 3rd grade class after my halloween lesson. Yes, they got scared, but they really kick a kick out of it. Typically, I save the horror shorts as rewards, at the end of the lesson, for my 5th and 6th graders (they absolutely love it) and my CTs have no problem with me showing it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FS-s56NY14k&ab_channel=MidnightVideo