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  • 303lmc
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11180 on: January 09, 2020, 12:16:55 pm »
Just did cooking day for camp. My CT and I decided toast, with different toppings, would be best. Yes, it's not the most creative, but for elementary school kids it's foolproof and relatively easy to clean up.

I brought a few things from home so the kids could sample different things; imported rye bread, different types of cheeses, decent butter, Marmite, baked beans, some Rooibos tea for after and even some peri-peri and chutney (had nothing to put it on, but brought it so they could taste it) etc.

It was pretty discouraging to see how apprehensive and averse the students were to trying anything new. They all just say there munching away at Spam and the most processed Lotte mart cheese you could imagine. The HR teacher came to "help" for the day and even she wasn't interested in sampling anything I brought. I told them these were from my home and some of the items were difficult to find outside South Africa or the UK, they'd likely never get the opportunity to try it again... no dice.

The only people who seemed to be raised with some manners were my CT and 2 girls who were courteous enough to sample a few of the things I brought. Incidentally, these 2 girls are the smartest students at camp.

Childhood was a long time ago, but I do remember seeing and reading that curiosity and the desire to try new things is a natural part of childhood. Sure, not all children are going to be so open, but when an entire class isn't interested in trying something new, that points to a possible problem.





see now this is why i refused to do a cooking camp.
 I did a game related to Cinco de Mayo and no one even cared. the students actually asked my why i was showing them about the holiday and different food etc...I realized early on the give ZERO f's about anything different.
so I will say I'm sorry no one even really tried anything, and thank you for at least trying.


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11181 on: January 09, 2020, 12:20:45 pm »
Yeah, many of the students, and even teachers....don't think many things we teach are relevant to them and so therefore do not care.....even if there is a connection the kids and teachers don't see it, Generally similar I think around the world with kids, but adults are usually better.... but in reference to trying new things...I think many people are guilty of that no matter where they are from
« Last Edit: January 09, 2020, 12:27:57 pm by nightninja »


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11182 on: January 09, 2020, 12:21:14 pm »
The average kid aged 6 to about 13 or so is not going to be very adventurous. Does anyone here not remember being a kid? Like seriously, are you guys that bad at knowing how kids think?

What did we as kids do? We picked toppings off of supreme pizzas. We screamed to go to McDonald's again and again even though mom and dad wanted to try the local diner or whatever.  Green Skittles? In the bin.  While our parents ate wheetabix we ate 3 bowls of Chocolate Frosted Sugar Bombs.

When I look at the different foods Korean kids eat and compare it to what I ate as a kid, they have way more variety in terms of ingredients.

Things Korean kids are eating that many of us would not eat when we're young (or even now)-
Snails
Mushrooms
Chicken Feet
Intestines
Liver
Lung meat
Blood Sausage
Pig Feet
Chicken Butt
Sea Squirt
Fish Eggs
Silkworm Pupae
Mystery Seafood
Various vegetables they're forced to wolf down
Bean paste broths
Tofu

Off the top of my head I wouldn't eat the following things as a kid-
Olives
Mushrooms
Peas
Anything spicy
Any white cheese except on pizza and parmesean cheese
Shellfish
Eggplant
Grapefruit
Cucumber
Beets

People's tastes change. Don't freak out over your kids eating preferences at this point in their life. They're kids. They are driven as much by advertising and their peers as anything else. And please, don't pretend that kids back home are little Anthony Bourdain's. If you offered them a cafeteria lunch from Korea or China, they'd probably freak out and throw it away.

If you can't remember your own childhood well and accurately, you probably shouldn't be teaching young kids.


  • fka
  • Veteran

    • 235

    • September 05, 2019, 06:37:44 pm
    • Seoul
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11183 on: January 09, 2020, 12:24:12 pm »
I'm not sure that British or North American kids would be much more receptive to unfamiliar foods, to be honest. At least not the ones I've spent time around. In fact it's quite normal for adult Americans to have a long list of foods they don't like / won't eat, ranging from mushrooms to sushi to any ethnic food that hasn't been repurposed by one of the top five fast food chains. This is likely changing as younger people are exposed to more diverse foods, but you'll find huge numbers of baby boomers living in the suburbs who think that cabbage is gross, or Indian food is full of monkey brains and tapeworms. I like that a lot of parents don't indulge pickiness outside of the English-speaking world. I know it's a pain to fight with your kid about food, but it creates a really distorted perception of food and agriculture when you build a lengthy "won't eat" list for a kid by the time he or she is eight years old. 
« Last Edit: January 09, 2020, 12:28:23 pm by fka »


  • fka
  • Veteran

    • 235

    • September 05, 2019, 06:37:44 pm
    • Seoul
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11184 on: January 09, 2020, 12:26:21 pm »
Whoops, Martino got in first. And I actually agree with him.  :cheesy:


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11185 on: January 09, 2020, 12:27:15 pm »
It was pretty discouraging to see how apprehensive and averse the students were to trying anything new. They all just say there munching away at Spam and the most processed Lotte mart cheese you could imagine.
Out there is some Korean who tried to teach her class of kids to eat whatever and is mystified the kids have zero interest in red pepper paste, sesame leaf, crab, kimchi, etc. and the kids are just munching away at the Oscar Meyer, Starkist, and Kraft singles for "Make Your Own Kimbap".


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11186 on: January 09, 2020, 12:31:50 pm »
see now this is why i refused to do a cooking camp.
 I did a game related to Cinco de Mayo and no one even cared. the students actually asked my why i was showing them about the holiday and different food etc...I realized early on the give ZERO f's about anything different.
so I will say I'm sorry no one even really tried anything, and thank you for at least trying.
Guys, 8 year old kids typically aren't filled with cultural wanderlust. They don't even understand the world of adults and many social customs of their OWN country let alone one they have zero connection to.

Yes, Cinco de Mayo got about as much interest as a lesson on Chuseok would get back home. They're kids. Their interests at this age are their friends, maybe some sports, and cartoons and games and crap. You know, stuff that's FUN and about HAVING FUN. Not "A cultural exploration of the various places around the world, which you will have to do a worksheet on in a language some of you can barely speak, while you have a 50% chance of being talked down to by your teacher and a 50% chance of getting yelled at or having it turn into a teachable moment if you do something wrong." I'm shocked kids are lukewarm to such a possibility.

Heck back home, our "interest" in Cinco de Mayo for most seems to be confined to eating Americanized Mexican fare and getting absolutely wasted while at some point in the night lumping Salsa music in with Mexican culture and running around dressed like the Frito Bandito. 
« Last Edit: January 09, 2020, 12:35:07 pm by Mr.DeMartino »


  • 303lmc
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11187 on: January 09, 2020, 12:36:16 pm »
see now this is why i refused to do a cooking camp.
 I did a game related to Cinco de Mayo and no one even cared. the students actually asked my why i was showing them about the holiday and different food etc...I realized early on the give ZERO f's about anything different.
so I will say I'm sorry no one even really tried anything, and thank you for at least trying.
Guys, 8 year old kids typically aren't filled with cultural wanderlust. They don't even understand the world of adults and many social customs of their OWN country let alone one they have zero connection to.

Yes, Cinco de Mayo got about as much interest as a lesson on Chuseok would get back home. They're kids. Their interests at this age are their friends, maybe some sports, and cartoons and games and crap. You know, stuff that's FUN and about HAVING FUN. Not "A cultural exploration of the various places around the world, which you will have to do a worksheet on in a language some of you can barely speak, while you have a 50% chance of being talked down to by your teacher and a 50% chance of getting yelled at or having it turn into a teachable moment if you do something wrong." I'm shocked kids are lukewarm to such a possibility.

Heck back home, our "interest" in Cinco de Mayo for most seems to be confined to eating Americanized Mexican fare and getting absolutely wasted while at some point in the night lumping Salsa music in with Mexican culture and running around dressed like the Frito Bandito. 
great  point but at some point what are you supposed to do with an after school class? now i know better. Games. FID


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11188 on: January 09, 2020, 12:42:14 pm »
Usually every so often in the material, there is some culture blurb. I usually save the stuff till then. 9/10 it just flies by. 1/10 something seems to catch the students' eye and they ask about it and then spontaneously I'd elaborate. If they wanted to learn more, special lesson time.

Don't get me wrong, I learned the hard way to. I guess I was lucky in that I already had some inkling from back home what Koreans tended to enjoy in terms of foreign foods and what got their attention in terms of holidays.

With adults its pretty easy. "I don't care about Cinco de Mayo." "It involves drinking." "I love Cinco de Mayo."


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2970

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11189 on: January 09, 2020, 12:59:32 pm »
It was pretty discouraging to see how apprehensive and averse the students were to trying anything new. They all just say there munching away at Spam and the most processed Lotte mart cheese you could imagine.
Out there is some Korean who tried to teach her class of kids to eat whatever and is mystified the kids have zero interest in red pepper paste, sesame leaf, crab, kimchi, etc. and the kids are just munching away at the Oscar Meyer, Starkist, and Kraft singles for "Make Your Own Kimbap".
yes, exactly. kids just like repetition. eating the same food, watching the same tv show/movies over and over, telling the same jokes, playing the same games


  • Mr C
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1794

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11190 on: January 09, 2020, 01:16:01 pm »
FID
Foreign Income Dividend?  Fur Is Dead? 


  • Mr C
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1794

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11191 on: January 09, 2020, 01:29:13 pm »
It was pretty discouraging to see how apprehensive and averse the students were to trying anything new. They all just say there munching away at Spam and the most processed Lotte mart cheese you could imagine.
Out there is some Korean who tried to teach her class of kids to eat whatever and is mystified the kids have zero interest in red pepper paste, sesame leaf, crab, kimchi, etc. and the kids are just munching away at the Oscar Meyer, Starkist, and Kraft singles for "Make Your Own Kimbap".
yes, exactly. kids just like repetition. eating the same food, watching the same tv show/movies over and over, telling the same jokes, playing the same games
While this is pretty much true, I don't think this is quite apt to the food tasting situation.

At my old school in the US, we had "International Day", and each class adopted a country.  They had to put together a display, do some kind of cultural presentation (often a folk dance),  and provide samples of a few dishes.  My experience was that many, many kids wanted to try the funny food ...


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2970

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11192 on: January 09, 2020, 01:30:58 pm »
fair enough. i was fairly picky as a kid and would have definitely not wanted to try any different foods. what food did the kids get to try btw?


  • 303lmc
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11193 on: January 09, 2020, 01:31:59 pm »


  • 303lmc
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11194 on: January 09, 2020, 01:35:55 pm »
fair enough. i was fairly picky as a kid and would have definitely not wanted to try any different foods. what food did the kids get to try btw?
were you picky because your parents didn't eat many different things or were picky themselves? I ask because I noticed as my sister raised her daughter, we'll call her T, T "didn't like" certain foods because her mom didn't. even as a 2 year old if her mom wouldn't eat it or would snub it, so would she. she's now 17 and still holds her mother's disdain for certain foods but has never even TRIED them herself. just curious, and  bored today. normally I don't comment on here because it dissolves into personal attacks and what not.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2970

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11195 on: January 09, 2020, 01:37:56 pm »
fair enough. i was fairly picky as a kid and would have definitely not wanted to try any different foods. what food did the kids get to try btw?
were you picky because your parents didn't eat many different things or were picky themselves? I ask because I noticed as my sister raised her daughter, we'll call her T, T "didn't like" certain foods because her mom didn't. even as a 2 year old if her mom wouldn't eat it or would snub it, so would she. she's now 17 and still holds her mother's disdain for certain foods but has never even TRIED them herself. just curious, and  bored today. normally I don't comment on here because it dissolves into personal attacks and what not.
no, it was just me. i was just a weird kid. but yeah that totally makes sense.


  • rhiane17
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • March 03, 2018, 09:45:12 pm
    • Korea
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11196 on: January 09, 2020, 01:39:50 pm »
Just did cooking day for camp. My CT and I decided toast, with different toppings, would be best. Yes, it's not the most creative, but for elementary school kids it's foolproof and relatively easy to clean up.

I brought a few things from home so the kids could sample different things; imported rye bread, different types of cheeses, decent butter, Marmite, baked beans, some Rooibos tea for after and even some peri-peri and chutney (had nothing to put it on, but brought it so they could taste it) etc.

It was pretty discouraging to see how apprehensive and averse the students were to trying anything new. They all just say there munching away at Spam and the most processed Lotte mart cheese you could imagine. The HR teacher came to "help" for the day and even she wasn't interested in sampling anything I brought. I told them these were from my home and some of the items were difficult to find outside South Africa or the UK, they'd likely never get the opportunity to try it again... no dice.

The only people who seemed to be raised with some manners were my CT and 2 girls who were courteous enough to sample a few of the things I brought. Incidentally, these 2 girls are the smartest students at camp.

Childhood was a long time ago, but I do remember seeing and reading that curiosity and the desire to try new things is a natural part of childhood. Sure, not all children are going to be so open, but when an entire class isn't interested in trying something new, that points to a possible problem.





see now this is why i refused to do a cooking camp.
 I did a game related to Cinco de Mayo and no one even cared. the students actually asked my why i was showing them about the holiday and different food etc...I realized early on the give ZERO f's about anything different.
so I will say I'm sorry no one even really tried anything, and thank you for at least trying.

I work in a super countryside school and all my kids have always been interested in different cultures, and I always try to teach them about it. I also brought in different foods from back home, even salt and vinegar crisps and even if they didn't like it, all of them tried it and they were really excited and actually asked to do it again! Also kids are kids, they are gonna be picky with food and apprehensive to try new things. Its's our job to create an environment and try to open our students minds. They aren't always going to have the reactions we expect.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2970

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11197 on: January 09, 2020, 01:42:20 pm »
Just did cooking day for camp. My CT and I decided toast, with different toppings, would be best. Yes, it's not the most creative, but for elementary school kids it's foolproof and relatively easy to clean up.

I brought a few things from home so the kids could sample different things; imported rye bread, different types of cheeses, decent butter, Marmite, baked beans, some Rooibos tea for after and even some peri-peri and chutney (had nothing to put it on, but brought it so they could taste it) etc.

It was pretty discouraging to see how apprehensive and averse the students were to trying anything new. They all just say there munching away at Spam and the most processed Lotte mart cheese you could imagine. The HR teacher came to "help" for the day and even she wasn't interested in sampling anything I brought. I told them these were from my home and some of the items were difficult to find outside South Africa or the UK, they'd likely never get the opportunity to try it again... no dice.

The only people who seemed to be raised with some manners were my CT and 2 girls who were courteous enough to sample a few of the things I brought. Incidentally, these 2 girls are the smartest students at camp.

Childhood was a long time ago, but I do remember seeing and reading that curiosity and the desire to try new things is a natural part of childhood. Sure, not all children are going to be so open, but when an entire class isn't interested in trying something new, that points to a possible problem.





see now this is why i refused to do a cooking camp.
 I did a game related to Cinco de Mayo and no one even cared. the students actually asked my why i was showing them about the holiday and different food etc...I realized early on the give ZERO f's about anything different.
so I will say I'm sorry no one even really tried anything, and thank you for at least trying.

I work in a super countryside school and all my kids have always been interested in different cultures, and I always try to teach them about it. I also brought in different foods from back home, even salt and vinegar crisps and even if they didn't like it, all of them tried it and they were really excited and actually asked to do it again! Also kids are kids, they are gonna be picky with food and apprehensive to try new things. Its's our job to create an environment and try to open our students minds. They aren't always going to have the reactions we expect.
yes but there's only so many times you're going to prepare something new and different only for the students to refuse to participate.


  • 303lmc
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11198 on: January 09, 2020, 01:57:26 pm »


I work in a super countryside school and all my kids have always been interested in different cultures, and I always try to teach them about it. I also brought in different foods from back home, even salt and vinegar crisps and even if they didn't like it, all of them tried it and they were really excited and actually asked to do it again! Also kids are kids, they are gonna be picky with food and apprehensive to try new things. Its's our job to create an environment and try to open our students minds. They aren't always going to have the reactions we expect.
[/quote]
yes but there's only so many times you're going to prepare something new and different only for the students to refuse to participate.
[/quote]
i'm super country side too and thought the same thing. It seems to depend on the day, tbh.
and yes, I didn't expect them to be EXCITED about Cinco, but to ask me why I was teaching about it, when it was like, May 5th??? whatever. lesson learned. don't expect them to like ANYTHING  I do. I'm still surprised at what they like to do that I sort of prepare. And it's always the activity I think is lame, or think 'oh they will hate this, lemme find something else in case..." I'm very thankful  for this site and all the lovely people who have contributed to it. seriously, thank you!!


Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #11199 on: January 09, 2020, 02:06:10 pm »
I work in a super countryside school and all my kids have always been interested in different cultures, and I always try to teach them about it. I also brought in different foods from back home, even salt and vinegar crisps and even if they didn't like it, all of them tried it and they were really excited and actually asked to do it again! Also kids are kids, they are gonna be picky with food and apprehensive to try new things. Its's our job to create an environment and try to open our students minds. They aren't always going to have the reactions we expect.

For the win.  Aristocrat's list really wasn't that outlandish.  A different kind of cheese?  He didn't force them to eat Casu Marzu.  Marmite is ace, love it.  But I doubt he's getting all bent out of shape by the kids not liking that as it has opinions divided amongst most people.  A different kind of bread?  What's wrong with that?  Butter?  Easily available in Korea.  Baked beans?  Again, you can buy them here easily.  Introducing new things is what we should be doing.  I've done at least sixty or so cooking classes here and I'm always interested in making the students interested A: in creative cooking B: to teach them something about cooking as most of them are wholly unprepared or lazy when it comes to cooking and C: to introduce new things to them.  I'm not buying into this pandering to their little whims.  'I don't like doing this' 'tough shit'.  Life isn't fair, we don't get to pick and choose what we want to do all the time.   

Actually, looking at the success rate from his class, would seem to reflect Korea as a whole.  80% can't be bothered trying something new, they'll go abroad and eat Korean food, they'll spend their holidays watching tv at home and eating chicken.  Then you get the 20% who try things at least once, travel abroad and experience new things.  Korean psyche isn't about being totally unique and different.  It's about the 'jeong' mentality.