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Ok, so here is my situation. I am married to a Korean and I am working at a terrible hagwon with horrible management (I have been working here for over 6 months). I am really starting to hate my life. The only way according to my contract to quit this job is to give a 90 day notice. However, I cannot survive at this job for 90 days. I want to quit ASAP. But I don't want to go back to my country. I can live with my husband in his house and do some tutoring or something. I am currently in the process of gathering my documents to get the F6 visa, but it takes time. So basically what I am asking is:

1. If I quit this job suddenly without giving proper notice and still decide to stay in this country, will I get into any kind of trouble?

2. Will it affect my chances of getting the F6 visa?

3. I am planning on leaving the country for a short period of time with a one-way visa to a nearby county. Can I just leave, pass in my ARC and come back without any problems?

***Also I'm Canadian, so I believe I can stay in this country for 6 months without a visa (if I had problems getting the f6). Also I already have my flight ticket booked for Canada for December.

4. Is it ok to kind of pull a fake midnight run? Meaning I don't give my boss any notice and just walk out and never contact her again other than to say I quit - but secretly stay in Korea. Can she find me and sue me or anything?

sorry for my terrible grammar... it's late, i'm stressed :(



  • CDW
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1783

    • June 15, 2011, 01:22:09 pm
    • Banned
Re: Thinking about quitting my hagwon but afraid of the consequences....
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2016, 07:18:23 am »
Ok, so here is my situation. I am married to a Korean and I am working at a terrible hagwon with horrible management (I have been working here for over 6 months). I am really starting to hate my life. The only way according to my contract to quit this job is to give a 90 day notice. However, I cannot survive at this job for 90 days. I want to quit ASAP. But I don't want to go back to my country. I can live with my husband in his house and do some tutoring or something. I am currently in the process of gathering my documents to get the F6 visa, but it takes time. So basically what I am asking is:

1. If I quit this job suddenly without giving proper notice and still decide to stay in this country, will I get into any kind of trouble?

2. Will it affect my chances of getting the F6 visa?

3. I am planning on leaving the country for a short period of time with a one-way visa to a nearby county. Can I just leave, pass in my ARC and come back without any problems?

***Also I'm Canadian, so I believe I can stay in this country for 6 months without a visa (if I had problems getting the f6). Also I already have my flight ticket booked for Canada for December.

4. Is it ok to kind of pull a fake midnight run? Meaning I don't give my boss any notice and just walk out and never contact her again other than to say I quit - but secretly stay in Korea. Can she find me and sue me or anything?

sorry for my terrible grammar... it's late, i'm stressed :(
If you quit then you must leave Korea within 2 weeks after your last day at work. Make sure to turn in your ARC to immigration at the airport in order to cancel your visa. You can come back the next day as a tourist. I have no idea how it will affect the F6 visa application process, but you'll still be married to a Korean. Don't worry about getting sued. There is no precedent for getting sued for simply quitting your job.


Re: Thinking about quitting my hagwon but afraid of the consequences....
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2016, 09:17:01 am »
1. You need to leave the country and come back as a tourist.

2. No, it won't affect it.

3. Yes

4. No, it's not ok because your work controls your visa. You need to actually leave the country and turn in your visa.

it doesn't take that long to get all the documents needed for an F visa. My husband and I got everything in less than a week and i went a few days later to get my visa changed and renewed. Get on it!


Re: Thinking about quitting my hagwon but afraid of the consequences....
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2016, 09:19:30 am »
I'm not sure how true this is because often what one immigration official tells you can contradict completely what is said by another....
Anyway, when I was getting my F6 processed, the guy told me that I shouldn't leave the country during that time.


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1248

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: Thinking about quitting my hagwon but afraid of the consequences....
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2016, 09:47:39 am »
An F6 visa is easy to get if you have no debt and can prove a legitimate marriage. I'm married too and I've met many people married to Koreans who went through the process. An F6 visa is the way to go.

If you have a child literally just go to Japan hand in your arc and come back on a visitor visa and have an F6 in a month or so.

No kid then maybe 1-6 months depending on your financial situation and relationship length and communication skills.

Also pictures with your spouse and your parents and/or siblings is a bonus..


  • nomadicmadda
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1585

    • July 01, 2014, 06:49:40 am
    • Seoul, formerly Boseong
    more
Re: Thinking about quitting my hagwon but afraid of the consequences....
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2016, 10:13:28 am »
I'm not sure how true this is because often what one immigration official tells you can contradict completely what is said by another....
Anyway, when I was getting my F6 processed, the guy told me that I shouldn't leave the country during that time.

This goes for anyone processing any visa; always wait until you receive your new ARC before leaving!

OP you can avoid this issue by leaving Korea, turning in your ARC card for your E2 visa, and returning as a tourist.  Once you return as a tourist, start the F6 visa application process.  You can also gather your documents now and have it all set and ready to go so that the day you return to Korea as a tourist, you can go walk and hand it in to immigration to begin processing.