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A few questions about moving country
« on: June 01, 2016, 12:50:20 pm »
Background information:  I'm coming up on one year in Korea.  I was asked a week or two ago if I intended to re-sign my contract and I said yes, though I wasn't completely sure.  Recently, some personal issues have come up and I'm definitely leaning against wanting to continue living in Korea.

1. My first question is how much would it screw over my school to have sent for the new contract and then back out before actually signing?  Would they still have time to find a replacement for me?  I don't want to leave with bad blood between me and my school as they haven't wronged me and I don't think it's ever good to burn bridges, but I haven't actually signed my contract yet and don't fully understand the point of the in between period.
2. I am basically just assuming this to be true, but with regards to future non-ESL-related employment I've always thought that only one year of teaching abroad on a resume might look a bit flaky.  My future career endeavors don't involve teaching or ESL at all, so I've also thought that doing beyond two years would look like I was killing time/aimless/not good at pursuing my goals.  So for a while I've thought doing two years in Korea would be perfect.  Any insight on this?
3. If I do back out on doing a second year here, I don't think I'm ready yet to be done teaching.  I've been looking into doing somewhere else in Asia, namely Vietnam.  However, I've always wanted to leave Korea and start my new pursuit immediately, rather than go home and search for jobs.  I'm actually not quite sure where "home" is.  So my question specifically is if it would be possible to line up a new job while living here without having to go back to my country of citizenship and gather documents or anything.
4.  Also with regards to lining up a job while in Korea, how does scheduling skype interviews or things like that work?  I can't exactly tell my school I have somewhere else I need to be and I don't imagine interviewing for another job while at my current job would go very well, especially as I've already declared intent to renew.

As you can see I'm feeling quite troubled over this.  Any insight is appreciated.


  • Hodlpu
  • Veteran

    • 100

    • May 06, 2015, 07:47:32 pm
    • Geoje, South Korea
Re: A few questions about moving country
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2016, 01:02:21 pm »
I have a friend who did the same thing.  She didn't wan't to flake or anything, but just couldn't stay due to certain circumstances.

The school was really cooperative about it though.  I'd say, talk to them and you guys can make an agreement of some sort.  It did mess up the schedule a bit, so her replacement came in extremely late (mid year), but I've met foreigners who have contracts ending in unconventional months.  I've never asked them, but I'm assuming it has happened quite a few times here in Korea.

If your school likes you, they'll probably figure something out with you, but will probably be sad. 

I know someone who signed, but only for 6 months.  If that's also an option for you.  He'll keep his re-signing bonus as well.


  • Imogen1991
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1109

    • March 18, 2015, 12:26:47 am
    • Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Re: A few questions about moving country
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2016, 01:16:10 pm »
I am moving to Vietnam in August when I'm done here and will be applying for jobs when I get there. Seems like the done thing in Vietnam! It might be possible to secure a job beforehand but I think the vast majority of employers recruit people who are already in Vietnam, especially if you don't want to live out in the sticks.

You should try to gather your documents while you're here, I don't think it will be necessary to go home. I'm going to get my mum to send my degree and police check to me here and take those with me along with my TEFL cert

Also in regards to backing out...I signed another contract and started the new one in April. I just handed in my notice last week. My new school are a little put out as I've only been here a month but there is no hard feelings at all and I have given plenty of notice for them to get a new teacher in the next orientation!
« Last Edit: June 01, 2016, 01:18:21 pm by Imogen1991 »


Re: A few questions about moving country
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2016, 01:44:19 pm »
I am moving to Vietnam in August when I'm done here and will be applying for jobs when I get there. Seems like the done thing in Vietnam! It might be possible to secure a job beforehand but I think the vast majority of employers recruit people who are already in Vietnam, especially if you don't want to live out in the sticks.

You should try to gather your documents while you're here, I don't think it will be necessary to go home. I'm going to get my mum to send my degree and police check to me here and take those with me along with my TEFL cert

Also in regards to backing out...I signed another contract and started the new one in April. I just handed in my notice last week. My new school are a little put out as I've only been here a month but there is no hard feelings at all and I have given plenty of notice for them to get a new teacher in the next orientation!
  So you are just going to enter Vietnam as a tourist?  I've got a friend who applied to a job in Hanoi from her home country and she loves it. She's not out in the country at all.  That's one of my biggest concerns with wanting to leave Korea.

Good idea to have the police check sent.

Glad everything is working out for you.


  • Imogen1991
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1109

    • March 18, 2015, 12:26:47 am
    • Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Re: A few questions about moving country
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2016, 01:57:00 pm »
I am moving to Vietnam in August when I'm done here and will be applying for jobs when I get there. Seems like the done thing in Vietnam! It might be possible to secure a job beforehand but I think the vast majority of employers recruit people who are already in Vietnam, especially if you don't want to live out in the sticks.

You should try to gather your documents while you're here, I don't think it will be necessary to go home. I'm going to get my mum to send my degree and police check to me here and take those with me along with my TEFL cert

Also in regards to backing out...I signed another contract and started the new one in April. I just handed in my notice last week. My new school are a little put out as I've only been here a month but there is no hard feelings at all and I have given plenty of notice for them to get a new teacher in the next orientation!
  So you are just going to enter Vietnam as a tourist?  I've got a friend who applied to a job in Hanoi from her home country and she loves it. She's not out in the country at all.  That's one of my biggest concerns with wanting to leave Korea.

Good idea to have the police check sent.

Glad everything is working out for you.

Oh really?! That's good to hear! I'm sure there are places that will hire beforehand but I think they are few and far between. Wouldn't hurt to try though!

Yep I'm flying out in August and will just enter as a tourist and do job-hunting and apartment-hunting once I get there
It's definitely riskier than coming to Korea but then, I think most things are, we are definitely spoon fed a lot here, especially in public school!


Re: A few questions about moving country
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2016, 03:18:01 pm »
Oh also do you know if the police check needs to be apostilled?  Or is that just a Korean thing lol


  • Imogen1991
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1109

    • March 18, 2015, 12:26:47 am
    • Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Re: A few questions about moving country
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2016, 03:33:04 pm »
Oh also do you know if the police check needs to be apostilled?  Or is that just a Korean thing lol

I think it's going to vary depending on how thorough your future employer is. I plan on getting mine apostilled just in case!


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
    more
Re: A few questions about moving country
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2016, 06:57:35 pm »
Like people have said, just be honest with your employer and tell them that you are going to leave. I can tell you from a business stand point that it's going to be work for them to find someone to replace you, but it's better for the business to find out sooner than later.

The thing with a lot of Korean businesses is that a lot of changes happen last minute, so it isn't convenient for the employees. But at the same time, businesses in Korea will understand last minute changes as well because last minute changes are just a part of most small/medium sized businesses in Korea.

I don't know of anyone who has lined up a job for them before actually leaving Korea, except for a few who went back to their home countries, but I guess it's not impossible. I believe most people will have an in-between time where they won't be making any money.
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com