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  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
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Here is a link to the most recent podcast episode. I basically talk about the most important question you need to answer in order for your hagwon to run successfully.

http://www.hagwonstart.com/hs063-what-do-you-really-want/

The question is simple: What do you really want?

I think if you can answer this question honestly, you'll be able to make more decisions a lot more easily. It's definitely important to know the answer to this question if you are an entrepreneur or are looking to start your own business one day.

Check out the podcast for more insight and to hear about some of my experiences in the hagwon industry.
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
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Here is a link to the latest post from Hagwonstart.com

http://www.hagwonstart.com/enjoy-your-life/

I just basically remind people with small education businesses to enjoy their lives and share some of the decisions I have made to ensure that I still find time to enjoy life.

I have passed by opportunities, so that I wouldn't be overwhelmed or too busy to find time for myself.

Running a hagwon or any business can be a lot of work and stress, so don't forget to enjoy your life!
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
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Check out the latest podcast episode where I talk about how I add students to the classes that already exist at my hagwon.

http://www.hagwonstart.com/hs064-adding-students-to-exisiting-classes/

Feel free to leave comments and questions
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
    more
Not knowing about the hagwon laws was the biggest fear I had before I operated my own small hagwon (Gyosoopso) in Seoul South Korea.

After more than 3.5 years of experience running my own business, I have realized that I worried for nothing.

Take some time to read my thoughts on hagwon business laws and learn about what things you should watch out for if you are going to start your own hagwon business one day.

Here is a link to the latest blog post, http://www.hagwonstart.com/the-truth-about-hagwon-business-laws/
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
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So, I work with my wife in my small hagwon and we have had our challenges.

I talk about how running a business with my wife has been.

I hope you can learn from my experiences if you decide to one day open a business with your significant other in Korea.

Check out the podcast episode by visiting the following link:

http://www.hagwonstart.com/hs065-your-relationship-with-your-wife-or-husband-as-a-business-partner/
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
    more
Here is the latest blog post, which is what I believe is the best way of "letting go" of a student from your hagwon, gongbubang, or gyosoopso business.

http://www.hagwonstart.com/how-to-let-go-of-a-student/

Feel free to leave comments or questions.
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
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Here is a blog post detailing the second flyer we used to advertise our small hagwon (gyosoopso) in Seoul, South Korea.

http://www.hagwonstart.com/our-second-flyer-of-our-hagwon-business/

Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2016, 05:17:33 pm »
This is a podcast episode of me explaining the job duties of a small hagwon owner. I describe each job duty and explain how difficult/hard each one is, and then I rank them.

Check out the podcast episode by visiting the following link:

http://www.hagwonstart.com/hs067-hagwon-business-job-duties-ranking-of-difficulty-and-importance/
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2016, 05:48:15 pm »
Curious...you talk about "global leadership", etc., yet you refer to yourself with the Konglish title "Tony Teacher" rather than "Mr. Choy".

Surely, you are aware that if your students were to ever use English outside of your hagwon or study abroad, they would need to use proper titles when addressing teachers and other adults, so why "Tony Teacher"?

It sounds quite ridiculous, though I know a few others that perpetuate this Konglish usage.

Mr., Ms., Dr,, Professor, etc. are the norm for English speakers, right?

Do you feel it's unimportant to address others properly and to teach that to your students?


  • IzEFunni
  • Veteran

    • 104

    • December 15, 2011, 09:35:38 am
    • SKorea
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #29 on: September 04, 2016, 04:04:20 am »
Thanks, you are right there isn't much on "how to start a Hagwon" and this sounds helpful.
Of course, any "how to" may not generate the same kind of success when developing a business.

I do like the idea of contacting parents but my Korean is very limited. I'm thinking of hiring a PR person for lack of a better term to deal with parent relationships.
 
Work Study Draw!!!

Here's like my best text book Prezi http://tinyurl.com/cgqvbcy


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #30 on: September 05, 2016, 12:46:58 pm »
Curious...you talk about "global leadership", etc., yet you refer to yourself with the Konglish title "Tony Teacher" rather than "Mr. Choy".

Surely, you are aware that if your students were to ever use English outside of your hagwon or study abroad, they would need to use proper titles when addressing teachers and other adults, so why "Tony Teacher"?

It sounds quite ridiculous, though I know a few others that perpetuate this Konglish usage.

Mr., Ms., Dr,, Professor, etc. are the norm for English speakers, right?

Do you feel it's unimportant to address others properly and to teach that to your students?

Great question, actually I used Tony Teacher when I first attempted to do something besides work for a hagwon or teach at a public school. Since most students knew me as "Tony Teacher", I kind of kept it so that I could better market myself as the main teacher of my small hagwon. I figured if my previous students saw the words "Tony Teacher" on an advertisement, as oppose to Mr. Choi, they would be able to recognize me more easily.

Tony Teacher has nothing to do with what I tell my students to call me, but it all has to do with branding. Naturally, the kids in the public school I was working at, prior to starting my hagwon, referred to their previous teacher as "Something Teacher". I kind of just went with Tony Teacher since that's what my co-teacher suggested.

However, at my own school, I tell students to refer to me as "Mr. Choi". But since I sometimes use Korean, especially when speaking with parents, and parents and my wife refer to me as "Tony 선생님 (Teacher)", the kids get really confused and don't know what to call me at times. Sometimes they call me Mr. Choi and sometimes they call me Tony Teacher, but I never let them call me "Tony".
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
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Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #31 on: September 05, 2016, 12:52:57 pm »
Thanks, you are right there isn't much on "how to start a Hagwon" and this sounds helpful.
Of course, any "how to" may not generate the same kind of success when developing a business.

I do like the idea of contacting parents but my Korean is very limited. I'm thinking of hiring a PR person for lack of a better term to deal with parent relationships.

Yeah, definitely, you are never guaranteed the same success, even if you were to do exactly what I did. At the same time, you can have 10X the success, you really never know because there are so many factors involved.

I guess you can hire someone to communicate with the parents, and some people have done that quite successfully. However, if you are going to start off small, it is best if you communicate directly with the parents. Also, nowadays, a lot of the parents can communicate enough in English.

Having someone communicate to the parents on your behalf can be quite a challenge though. A lot of things can be misinterpreted and the responses you and your PR person want to relay to the parents can be very different from one another.
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #32 on: September 05, 2016, 12:59:04 pm »
I let my students call me Donovan Teacher and I don't feel like I'm failing them. And I'm not trying to brand myself. They call all their other teachers in the same fashion. It may not be what we do in America, but here it helps lend credence to the notion that I'm the students' teacher like all the others who teach them at school and that I should be treated in kind.  I don't think I'm ruining them for the future.  If they ever go to an English speaking country or read a book and encounter the word 'mister' I'm sure they won't be too thrown off and can synthesize the new word fairly quickly should it be important to do so.


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #33 on: September 05, 2016, 01:45:55 pm »
Thanks for responding.

I know I'm splitting hairs.  This is mere minutiae

People should address others how they wish to be addressed, unless the school or place of employment has a policy, which many schools do.

The text books we use and the official curriculum use the proper honorifics, so my students are taught to address me as Mr. Nut.

BTW,  thanks for taking the time to share your experience.


Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #34 on: September 05, 2016, 01:52:36 pm »
Thanks for responding.

I know I'm splitting hairs.  This is mere minutiae

People should address others how they wish to be addressed, unless the school or place of employment has a policy, which many schools do.

The text books we use and the official curriculum use the proper honorifics, so my students are taught to address me as Mr. Nut.

BTW,  thanks for taking the time to share your experience.
I think I'll keep on calling you Pecan if you don't mind~ :laugh:



  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #35 on: September 05, 2016, 02:18:13 pm »
Well, since you aren't fortunate enough to be one of my students, I'll let it slide ;)


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #36 on: September 06, 2016, 07:50:53 pm »
Thanks for responding.

I know I'm splitting hairs.  This is mere minutiae

People should address others how they wish to be addressed, unless the school or place of employment has a policy, which many schools do.

The text books we use and the official curriculum use the proper honorifics, so my students are taught to address me as Mr. Nut.

BTW,  thanks for taking the time to share your experience.

I'm more than happy to share about my experiences.

Thanks for asking!
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #37 on: September 10, 2016, 10:15:22 am »
Here is the latest podcast episode, which is about making sacrifices for your business.

If you start any type of business, you'll make sacrifices. It isn't easy starting and running any type of business, but it is definitely possible.

In this episode I talk a little bit about my experiences in the hagwon industry.

As always, feel free to comment or ask questions.

http://www.hagwonstart.com/hs068-making-sacrifices-for-your-hagwon-business/
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • Tony Teacher
  • Veteran

    • 170

    • April 26, 2012, 10:10:52 am
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #38 on: September 23, 2016, 07:46:58 pm »
http://www.hagwonstart.com/hs070-how-i-truly-feel-about-english-education-in-korea/

The latest podcast episode where I share my honest thoughts about English education in Korea.
Business Consultant and Coach at www.entrepreneurkorea.com and www.hagwonstart.com


  • The Arm
  • Expert Waygook

    • 682

    • March 09, 2015, 09:15:02 am
Re: Hagwon Start Website & Podcast: Start, Build and Grow Your Hagwon in Korea
« Reply #39 on: September 23, 2016, 09:24:07 pm »
http://www.hagwonstart.com/hs070-how-i-truly-feel-about-english-education-in-korea/

The latest podcast episode where I share my honest thoughts about English education in Korea.

This was really interesting, I enjoyed it.

Loved the anecdote about the book store.  It still happens!  My colleages regularly ask me to tag along whilst they pick up random (and useless) books and ask if we should buy them  :laugh: