Read 1454 times

  • Lunaella
  • Waygookin

    • 19

    • January 28, 2016, 03:32:18 am
    • USA
Paperwork as a public school NET
« on: May 14, 2016, 10:27:28 pm »
I hear a lot about all the paperwork that is needed to obtain a teaching job in Korea, especially in public schools, but I'm wondering if NETs are required to do a lot of paperwork once they are working the job? Is there any grading, monthly reports, or other paperwork that NETs are responsible for? What is your experience?


Re: Paperwork as a public school NET
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2016, 06:04:31 am »
i give a speaking test twice a semester and give them a grade. only paperwork/grading i do.


Re: Paperwork as a public school NET
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2016, 09:48:20 am »
One school wanted me to submit my lesson plans every week for about half a year, then they said I didn't have to anymore.

Another school had me grade speaking tests for one semester.

That's pretty much the extent of my paperwork here so far. Some schools actually let teachers assign and grade homework, or so I've read. :O


Re: Paperwork as a public school NET
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2016, 01:11:20 pm »
Maybe technically we are supposed to do stuff in the stupid NEIS system, especially for taking days off, but it's all in Korean so we shouldn't be bothered with it, get your CT to deal with it for you if they want to insist we get signed up on a non-English system. I don't care if you know high-level Korean, it is annoying that Korean bureaucracies very rarely take the time to at least provide English-language options for services that are intended to be used by non-Koreans.

ANYWAY other than that no you should not really have any kind of paperwork or real administrative responsibility. The only thing you might have to do is make lesson plans which will especially need to be provided for after-school programs, there is some kind of bureaucratic requirement for you to provide them for the school to get funding. Just put as brief a lesson plan as possible because nobody will look at it.

It could be nice to have more administrative responsibilities like making/grading tests or being involved in report card grades, but Korean grading/testing tends to be a nonsensical face-saving farce. And even if you speak high-level Korean and can comfortably put up with the bureaucracy of a Korean public school, NETS are still seen as rather expendable "highly-paid" circus clowns meant to entertain the kids. Until that changes I don't see the point of the risk of taking on more responsibilities for students' progress.

What happens when the Principal or the kids' mothers get upset with test scores? "Oh, the NET is responsible for making and grading the tests." That's right, you'll be first to get thrown under the bus, because we can be non-renewed or otherwise pushed out, and we're at the bottom of the Korean totem pole. (I guarantee you that your school has put together a totem pole flowchart, and you WILL be at the bottom) It's better to just do games with the kids and keep them happy and let your CT's deal with testing and grades and so on.

I realize that sounds bitter but I had to do a year of PS afternoon classes with feral kids, no CT in the room, and zero disciplinary support from the Korean teachers or administrative staff. If they don't want to help me with something as basic as kids running around on top of desks, I'm not going to help with testing.
Quote
Quote from: Mr.DeMartino on Yesterday at 01:40:32 PM
    Trump is a liar and a con man.
Quote
Quote from Mr.DeMartino on June 14, 2019 at 02:28:07 pm
Donald Trump is a lying sack of shit


  • yirj17
  • The Legend

    • 2782

    • September 16, 2015, 02:23:16 am
    • Korealand
Re: Paperwork as a public school NET
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2016, 08:14:20 am »
One of my elementary schools wants copies of all my lesson plans and materials. The first time I made a lesson plan, my elem. coT told me it was too long and I could make it briefer. I suspect she just didn't want to read a detailed lesson plan but hey, easier on me. (Then again, I'm also not sure she reads them at all. The school might just want them)

My middle schools don't require copies of my lesson plans except for open classes. One of my middle schools asked me to make speaking tests (once about every three weeks) and grade them but the other didn't.

Even just among my 4 schools there are different expectations so you never really know until you get here. But in my case, I don't have a lot of paperwork.


  • Paul
  • Featured Contributor

    • 2056

    • September 21, 2010, 10:28:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Paperwork as a public school NET
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2016, 08:18:40 am »
Other than NEIS which MayorHaggar described well (simply put, until you teach me to use it, I cannot be expected to know how to use it) there's not really anything. There are of course lesson plans, but the majority of the coworkers I've had seemed more interested in ensuring anything I did involved a superfluous PPT that they could upload to Indieschool for karma over any sort of formal written or typed plans. As such, most of my plans are of the basic list-of-dot-points with CCQs in the margin for my own sake variety.

Having said that, it is recommended for you to log your own timesheets/notes to cover your arse in case anything is disputed later, particularly if your school tries to wrangle any free hours out of you.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2016, 08:24:18 am by Paul »
More primary school colours and shapes activity ideas and resources than you'd ever need - here
Holy free educational fonts Batman!


  • bjinglee
  • Expert Waygook

    • 545

    • March 10, 2011, 10:29:48 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Paperwork as a public school NET
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2016, 07:33:07 am »
It depends on the school. Nearly all PS jobs will require you to do a speaking test once per semester. Some schools will have you do light admin work like checking over speeches for competitions, weekly class work, etc. It all depends on the school. No one situation is like another. 


Re: Paperwork as a public school NET
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2016, 07:49:56 am »
It depends on the paperwork.

I personally don't have to do lesson plans (thank goodness) but there are plenty of forms I have to sign on a fairly regular basis. Permission for extra hours, business trips (when you need to leave school to do things like go to the immigration office, etc), papers to sign for sick days and vacation. Of course these all depend on how often you have to leave during work hours.

But every school is different. And if you consider lesson planning outside of class, making power points and games, paperwork.

Though if you're scared of paperwork, maybe teaching isn't the right career path.


  • khalavala
  • Expert Waygook

    • 505

    • July 31, 2014, 06:13:40 am
    • Toronto
    more
Re: Paperwork as a public school NET
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2016, 08:00:00 am »
I hear a lot about all the paperwork that is needed to obtain a teaching job in Korea, especially in public schools, but I'm wondering if NETs are required to do a lot of paperwork once they are working the job? Is there any grading, monthly reports, or other paperwork that NETs are responsible for? What is your experience?

Little to no paperwork outside of preparing the lesson plans for open classes and summer/winter camps.

One time I was asked to write feedback for students because I was in charge of special english class for a semester and they needed to get graded.

Your experience may vary.