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World's young are oppressed?
« on: May 02, 2016, 05:17:56 pm »
I don't think this applies as much in North America with regards to employment restrictions and residency requirements, but the high cost of housing in some places could apply, however.  (I'm either an old Millennial or young Gen Xer, but I can sympathize with these things.  It puts off the business of living, especially given the toll the bad economy took the last few years.) 


http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21688856-worlds-young-are-oppressed-minority-unleash-them-young-gifted-and-held-back


Re: World's young are oppressed?
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2016, 05:20:02 pm »
Interesting quote regarding housing in Britain but can apply to many NA cities too. Regulations, zoning permits, even some green space and height restrictions, amongst other things can contribute too.

""" Housing, too, is often rigged against the young. Homeowners dominate the bodies that decide whether new houses may be built. They often say no, so as not to spoil the view and reduce the value of their own property. Over-regulation has doubled the cost of a typical home in Britain. Its effects are even worse in many of the big cities around the world where young people most want to live. Rents and home prices in such places have far outpaced incomes."""


Re: World's young are oppressed?
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2016, 06:47:27 pm »
People need to check the dictionary definition of 'oppressed'. Young people today have it tough if they want to buy a house in London or the South east, that's true. On the other hand the unemployment rate in the UK is 5%, as opposed to 12% in the 80s.


Re: World's young are oppressed?
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2016, 07:31:20 pm »
Make it illegal for non-citizens to buy property. So much housing in California and the UK is horribly overpriced because people are either buying property as an investment (instead of, y'know, a place to live) or to safely park money outside of their corrupt home country.

If someone has a long-term residency visa and spends time in the property and has an interest in the community, whatever. If some idle son of a sheik wants to buy a bunch of giant luxury flats in central London and leave them empty, **** that. It doesn't serve any purpose to the UK other than to inflate housing prices.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2016, 07:33:21 pm by MayorHaggar »
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Quote from Mr.DeMartino on June 14, 2019 at 02:28:07
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Re: World's young are oppressed?
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2016, 12:04:20 pm »
Make it illegal for non-citizens to buy property. So much housing in California and the UK is horribly overpriced because people are either buying property as an investment (instead of, y'know, a place to live) or to safely park money outside of their corrupt home country.

If someone has a long-term residency visa and spends time in the property and has an interest in the community, whatever. If some idle son of a sheik wants to buy a bunch of giant luxury flats in central London and leave them empty, **** that. It doesn't serve any purpose to the UK other than to inflate housing prices.

Vancouver too.  Toronto to a lesser extent.  That's a huge problem.  Any foreigner who wants to buy a property and rarely live in it should be made to pay a double or triple tax or quadruple tax.  Also make it mandatory for foreigners to have some kind of a special real estate account before they can buy a property over a certain amount (IE $200 K or so).  Let them keep the funds in this account for a year before they can buy a property.  If they are immgirating and going to live there, fine.  If not, make it harder for them.  One of the rare times, I'll actually advocate for more red tape. 

Add in zoning restrictions, height restrictions in many cities, green land policies, taxes, fees, paperwork, etc and this all combined with the foreigner buying makes for too high of a living cost.  Nah charge the Chinese who buy up in Vancouver 5x the tax rate and use it to build affordable condos for middle class families which could be sold more cheaply.  IE, a 3 or 4 bedroom high rise condo could be sold for 300 to 400 K.  The foreigners property taxes will pay the rest of the value if it if it's overpriced at a million bucks or something ridiculous like that.  (One of the rare times, I'd call for redistribution.  But that's only because we're getting ripped off so badly.) 


Re: World's young are oppressed?
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2016, 02:58:41 pm »
Make it illegal for non-citizens to buy property. So much housing in California and the UK is horribly overpriced because people are either buying property as an investment (instead of, y'know, a place to live) or to safely park money outside of their corrupt home country.

If someone has a long-term residency visa and spends time in the property and has an interest in the community, whatever. If some idle son of a sheik wants to buy a bunch of giant luxury flats in central London and leave them empty, **** that. It doesn't serve any purpose to the UK other than to inflate housing prices.

Vancouver too.  Toronto to a lesser extent.  That's a huge problem.  Any foreigner who wants to buy a property and rarely live in it should be made to pay a double or triple tax or quadruple tax.  Also make it mandatory for foreigners to have some kind of a special real estate account before they can buy a property over a certain amount (IE $200 K or so).  Let them keep the funds in this account for a year before they can buy a property.  If they are immgirating and going to live there, fine.  If not, make it harder for them.  One of the rare times, I'll actually advocate for more red tape. 

Add in zoning restrictions, height restrictions in many cities, green land policies, taxes, fees, paperwork, etc and this all combined with the foreigner buying makes for too high of a living cost.  Nah charge the Chinese who buy up in Vancouver 5x the tax rate and use it to build affordable condos for middle class families which could be sold more cheaply.  IE, a 3 or 4 bedroom high rise condo could be sold for 300 to 400 K.  The foreigners property taxes will pay the rest of the value if it if it's overpriced at a million bucks or something ridiculous like that.  (One of the rare times, I'd call for redistribution.  But that's only because we're getting ripped off so badly.)

inb4 someone posts something like "Why do you hate the free market? Just bend over and take it from these communists, everything will be fine."

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/13/world/americas/canada-vancouver-chinese-immigrant-wealth.html
Quote
Quote from: Mr.DeMartino on Yesterday at 01:40:32
    Trump is a liar and a con man.
Quote
Quote from Mr.DeMartino on June 14, 2019 at 02:28:07
Donald Trump is a lying sack of shit


Re: World's young are oppressed?
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2016, 09:15:34 pm »
People need to check the dictionary definition of 'oppressed'. Young people today have it tough if they want to buy a house in London or the South east, that's true. On the other hand the unemployment rate in the UK is 5%, as opposed to 12% in the 80s.

..if the official rate is to be trusted, and not manipulated like in the US.

Britains problems will worsen if they vote to stay in the EU.

The globalists and their media are already fear-mongering to scare Britons into voting stay. They're already sabotaging the pound to put the frighteners on in advance.

I don't think this applies as much in North America

Are you kidding? Half of America's young adults are still living with their parents and unable to form their own households.

The middle class is being destroyed, the jobs have been deliberately outsourced overseas. A tiny elite is getting richer, 99% are getting poorer.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2016, 09:19:40 pm by Kliuchevskoi »
Creating shared values


Re: World's young are oppressed?
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2016, 08:00:03 am »
People need to check the dictionary definition of 'oppressed'. Young people today have it tough if they want to buy a house in London or the South east, that's true. On the other hand the unemployment rate in the UK is 5%, as opposed to 12% in the 80s.

..if the official rate is to be trusted, and not manipulated like in the US.

Britains problems will worsen if they vote to stay in the EU.

The globalists and their media are already fear-mongering to scare Britons into voting stay. They're already sabotaging the pound to put the frighteners on in advance.

I don't think this applies as much in North America

Are you kidding? Half of America's young adults are still living with their parents and unable to form their own households.

The middle class is being destroyed, the jobs have been deliberately outsourced overseas. A tiny elite is getting richer, 99% are getting poorer.

My quote bolded is because of this from the article:

""In many countries, labour laws require firms to offer copious benefits and make it hard to lay workers off. That suits those with jobs, who tend to be older, but it makes firms reluctant to hire new staff. The losers are the young.""

In France and other countries, it is hard to lay off or fire.  In Korea too, I think.  So, companies are reluctant to hire new people.  The older who got the jobs win and the younger who don't have the jobs before these changes went into effect lose. 

But, where the young face a problem is with high housing costs due to local, provincial or state, and national governments zoning, regulating, shutting off land due to green spaces, etc.  That really saps the quality of life more than anything else.  Whether it's agenda 21 (and some unknown entities pressuring local governments to pass these things is anyones guess) or just plain stupidity is hard to say.  The unemployments may be lower, now, but those middle class jobs our elders had seem to be far less and in between.  Maybe that will imporve with time if there is a real recovery or maybe the numbers are just being doctored. 



 


Re: World's young are oppressed?
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2016, 09:40:42 am »
Any foreigner who wants to buy a property and rarely live in it should be made to pay a double or triple tax or quadruple tax.
Capital gains taxes should be raised for investment properties. If one cannot prove they lived in the house they purchased (more than 200 days a year), it is an investment property. If they collected rent money, it is certainly an investment property.
I don't think they should pay extra property tax though. They aren't even using most municipal services if they leave it vacant.