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  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4346

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #100 on: February 23, 2016, 08:44:26 am »
How many times do people have to prove to you that:

1) affirmative action mostly benefits white women

2) the ACTUAL, older and original form of affirmative action has been benefiting white Americans for centuries

3) if you look at the number of "unqualified" white students that get into university, they dwarf the number of "unqualified" black and Latino students in the same situation

So yes, you're sort of right...affirmative action does affect Asian American students...just not in the way you so desperately hope it does.

« Last Edit: February 23, 2016, 09:06:27 am by waygo0k »


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4346

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #101 on: February 23, 2016, 09:04:22 am »
As for the original post of this thread, things are happening much faster than I had anticipated.

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/thousands-rally-after-conviction-ex-cop-peter-liang-death-akai-n522546

Thousands Rally After Conviction of Ex-Cop Peter Liang in Death of Akai Gurley

If you don't fully understand the case of ex(fired) NYPD Officer Peter Liang, here's a quick recap:

- Liang, a rookie and his rookie partner were patrolling the dark stairwell of a public housing building

- Liang was spooked and discharged his weapon. The bullet ricocheted off the wall and hit Akai Gurley, an unarmed black man who was just walking the stairway with his girlfriend.

- At first Liang didn't realise his shot had hit someone, as he walked down the stairs it became apparent that he had shot Gurley.

- Instead of calling for an ambulance and assisting the victim, Liang is alleged to have contacted his police union rep as Gurley lay dying

- Liang was subsequently fired and left to dry by the NYPD and the police union...fast forward a few years, he's  now been convicted of manslaughter

This conviction of Liang has outraged NY's community and spit it into two main factions:

* Those who want Liang to be afforded the same white privilege as officers that killed Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Eric Garner etc - http://nypost.com/2016/02/20/10000-protesters-rallying-in-support-of-ex-cop-peter-liang/

and

* Those who want the killers of Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Eric Garner etc to face the same justice Peter Liang is facing - http://www.asamnews.com/2016/02/20/why-many-asian-americans-support-conviction-of-peter-liang/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steph-yin/peter-liang-protests_b_9289990.html

I can only say that more incidents of double standards and broken promises will continue to irk and irritate the "model minority". The question remains as to how much they're willing to take before they decide enough is enough.


Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #102 on: February 23, 2016, 09:21:53 am »
So Asians are victims of-
1) Stereotypes. However, stereotypes are often based on truth. Look at what the West has contributed to the world versus what Asia has contributed. Apparently, extreme emphasis on test scores has not resulted in better creativity.

"Contributed" is an interesting choice of words. Usually that implies charity and the like. I don't think that that is appropriate when you look at the history of invention around the world. Very few people 'contribute'.

Those questions are irrelevant when trying to have an objective admissions standards. Also, there are laws that prohibit discrimination based on race and ethnicity. Lastly, those kids are Americans. If you accept stereotypes as having a basis, you have to accept the negative ones that apply to you as well. Usually people who say "stereotypes are based on truth" are the first to howl when one is applied to them.

Anyways, Affirmative Action is nonsense if black/latino kids are getting in with test scores significantly less than Asian students. You're talking about potentially not having collegiate level reading, writing, and mathematics skills.


  • donuts81
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1364

    • October 20, 2010, 10:23:37 am
    • Korea
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #103 on: February 23, 2016, 03:08:22 pm »
Quote
- At first Liang didn't realise his shot had hit someone, as he walked down the stairs it became apparent that he had shot Gurley.

- Instead of calling for an ambulance and assisting the victim, Liang is alleged to have contacted his police union rep as Gurley lay dying

- Liang was subsequently fired and left to dry by the NYPD and the police union...fast forward a few years, he's  now been convicted of manslaughter

It sounds like the very definition of manslaughter. It would have been better for him if he'd shot at the guy intentionally and then have it turn out he'd made a mistake.
"You can't hurt me now, Mr Lee. I've lost all feeling"


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4346

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #104 on: February 23, 2016, 03:32:27 pm »
Liang would have been convicted regardless.

Remember how nothing happened to the two white officers who shot Tamir Rice within 2 seconds, but somehow the two non-white officers who accidentally killed Jeremy Mardis in a police chase were charged within days.

Or how the only officer to be charged in the Eric Garner case happened to be the black female supervisor.

The really messed up part in Liang's conviction, is that his partner was given immunity, meaning he will never be charged or convicted.

Liang never had a chance the moment he fired that weapon. He felt the blue brotherhood would protect him...only to be faced with a daunting reality.


  • Loki88
  • Expert Waygook

    • 722

    • July 25, 2014, 08:41:07 am
    • Seoul
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #105 on: February 23, 2016, 09:15:30 pm »
I don't see why Liang's partner should not have immunity. He didn't actually do anything.

That's literally the single best way to not experience the consequences of an action.

I disagree with your analysis. He wasn't screwed after he shot the gun it was when he called his boss instead of an ambulance. It went from accident to crime at that moment.


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4346

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #106 on: February 23, 2016, 11:30:50 pm »
Just like Liang, the partner also did nothing to help Gurley.

They were both arguing with each other about what to do as Gurley was on the ground. The fact that he too was fired shows he was at fault.

I don't see how he could be protected and Liang charged/convicted.


  • Loki88
  • Expert Waygook

    • 722

    • July 25, 2014, 08:41:07 am
    • Seoul
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #107 on: February 24, 2016, 12:01:33 am »
Just like Liang, the partner also did nothing to help Gurley.

They were both arguing with each other about what to do as Gurley was on the ground. The fact that he too was fired shows he was at fault.

I don't see how he could be protected and Liang charged/convicted.

Shooting somebody is a crime.  One should be charged.
Not shooting somebody is not a crime. One should not be charged.

as a police officer one's duty is to protect the public. They both failed and were subsequently fired.

I don't see how you can be confusing their jobs with actual written law. The two are distinct and separate with separate expectations of behaviour.


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4346

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #108 on: February 24, 2016, 01:10:30 am »
Failing to assist a gunshot victim at a scene of crime, is at the very least misconduct.

Nobody is saying the partner should have been charged for the shooting. I'm saying its messed up he wasn't charged for anything, despite his actions indirectly leading to Gurner's death.

Moreover, the officer was only just fired this week...almost 2 years after the incident happened.


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4669

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #109 on: February 24, 2016, 06:59:53 am »
Moreover, the officer was only just fired this week...almost 2 years after the incident happened.

That is called "Due Process".

Skip it, and you end up having to reinstate people.


  • Loki88
  • Expert Waygook

    • 722

    • July 25, 2014, 08:41:07 am
    • Seoul
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #110 on: February 24, 2016, 07:26:28 am »
Failing to assist a gunshot victim at a scene of crime, is at the very least misconduct.

Nobody is saying the partner should have been charged for the shooting. I'm saying its messed up he wasn't charged for anything, despite his actions indirectly leading to Gurner's death.

Moreover, the officer was only just fired this week...almost 2 years after the incident happened.

No it is not. Gurneys girlfriend was also there. She was also not charged. Same for any other people that may have been in that elevator. There is no law on the books stating you have to help other people.

It was his job to help people. Which he failed to do and was subsequently fired for. He didn't break any laws however.

You seem to be confusing morals and actual law. You can be fired for the first but no arrested.


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4346

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #111 on: February 24, 2016, 08:18:11 am »
"Protect and Serve"...I'm pretty sure their JOB DESCRIPTION includes helping gunshot victims, or people whose lives are at immediate risk, should they come across one.

As a matter of fact, the only person that attempted CPR on Gurley WAS his girlfriend.

If a police officer (in Eric Garner's case) can be charged for "failing to supervise a situation"...ie not doing your job properly, Liang's partner should also be charged under similar terms with regards to one's incompetence, directly or indirectly leading to the death of an individual.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1702

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #112 on: February 24, 2016, 08:36:00 am »


[Failure to assist is not a crime]. Gurneys girlfriend was also there. She was also not charged. Same for any other people that may have been in that elevator. There is no law on the books stating you have to help other people.

It was his job to help people. Which he failed to do and was subsequently fired for. He didn't break any laws however.

You seem to be confusing morals and actual law. You can be fired for the first but no arrested.
What? :huh:
Actually there are. Lots of them
In many countries, citizens are legally obliged to give all reasonable assistance. In many American states, citizens are legally required to notify emergency services.
Collectively, these laws are know asDuty to Rescue.
Even in the States, there are many occasions when one is legally required to assist. For example:
Quote
American criminal law makes an exception to the general rule and imposes a duty to rescue in a number of circumstances. Where there is a significant relationship between a victim and potential rescuer, the law steps in and requires a bystander to act. In the absence of such action, the bystander commits a crime. Such duties that arise from relationships consist of the following: 1) a duty based on a personal relationship; 2) a duty based on a contract; 3) a duty based on creating the risk; 4) a duty based *99 upon voluntary assumption of care; 5) a duty based on statute; 6) a duty to control the conduct of others; and 7) a duty based on being a landowner. [FN25]

As this article shows, there can be some hefty huge fines and lengthy prison sentences for people who can help but choose not to. For example, those idiot reporters who snapped photos of Princess Diana rather than assisting were slapped with some pretty serious charges.
One's obligation to assist becomes far greater if one is a trained emergency service provider (paramedic, police, lifeguard, firefighter etc). For example, as a lifeguard, I was legally obliged not to allow people to drown. Even if I really hated them.
Likewise, police officers in America have a number of additional legal obligations. This article does a fair job at outlining them.

Other Western have more stringent laws regarding our responsibilities towards each other.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2016, 08:39:50 am by kyndo »


Re: The inevitable demise of the "model minority' myth
« Reply #113 on: February 24, 2016, 09:45:55 am »


[Failure to assist is not a crime]. Gurneys girlfriend was also there. She was also not charged. Same for any other people that may have been in that elevator. There is no law on the books stating you have to help other people.

It was his job to help people. Which he failed to do and was subsequently fired for. He didn't break any laws however.

You seem to be confusing morals and actual law. You can be fired for the first but no arrested.
What? :huh:
Actually there are. Lots of them
In many countries, citizens are legally obliged to give all reasonable assistance. In many American states, citizens are legally required to notify emergency services.
Collectively, these laws are know asDuty to Rescue.
Even in the States, there are many occasions when one is legally required to assist. For example:
Quote
American criminal law makes an exception to the general rule and imposes a duty to rescue in a number of circumstances. Where there is a significant relationship between a victim and potential rescuer, the law steps in and requires a bystander to act. In the absence of such action, the bystander commits a crime. Such duties that arise from relationships consist of the following: 1) a duty based on a personal relationship; 2) a duty based on a contract; 3) a duty based on creating the risk; 4) a duty based *99 upon voluntary assumption of care; 5) a duty based on statute; 6) a duty to control the conduct of others; and 7) a duty based on being a landowner. [FN25]

As this article shows, there can be some hefty huge fines and lengthy prison sentences for people who can help but choose not to. For example, those idiot reporters who snapped photos of Princess Diana rather than assisting were slapped with some pretty serious charges.
One's obligation to assist becomes far greater if one is a trained emergency service provider (paramedic, police, lifeguard, firefighter etc). For example, as a lifeguard, I was legally obliged not to allow people to drown. Even if I really hated them.
Likewise, police officers in America have a number of additional legal obligations. This article does a fair job at outlining them.

Other Western have more stringent laws regarding our responsibilities towards each other.

Surely we all remember the last episode of Seinfeld.

Actually most of us have been trying to forget it...