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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #60 on: February 22, 2016, 04:02:56 pm »
I remember my wife asking me why I wasn't thinking about buying a Ford or Chrysler a few years ago back home.


'Are you serious?' I replied.

'North American cars suck!'

She smiled, then asked what I preferred.

'German or Japanese.  Everything else isn't worth the money'.

She laughed pretty hard at that.

Most cars these days are a mish-mash of components from all over the world, especially with joint ventures and partial ownerships.

Anyways, American cars are great if you're talking trucks and SUVs. You really can't do much better than an American full-size pickup for serious hauling and work. Chrysler has some beautiful designs for its cars. Brute power in a relatively affordable package defines American sports cars. Lincoln and Cadillac are great for full-size luxury interior comfort (although lacking the performance and refinement of German/Japanese models). The Crown Vic police interceptor and the Charger R/T are really the best when it comes to police vehicles.

Anyways, aren't American cars like American pizza or Chinese food these days- mostly made by Mexicans? Seriously man, Chef Rodriguez whips up the best Kung Pao chicken north or south of the Rio Grande. Puts Chef Wong to shame

 
Koreans have already been brainwashed into thinking Korean is better, and as such (in cases such as beef) they can charge ludicrous amounts for a product that is at beston on par with similar products, but far inferior to others (Australian beef is miles better, but no Korean will admit that - i am not Australian).  Think about it, how many times have you heard Koreans argue against Korean made things?

Korean beef is better tasting for Korean food, American for western. I'm not sure about Australian beef. You try and cook western food with Korean beef or vice versa and it just doesn't come out right. Hanwoo burgers are awful compared to their American counterparts, whereas Korean bbq with American beef just doesn't hold a candle. Korean ribeye is so much better for bulgogi. Beef bourguignon made with Korean beef was lacking. Maybe it has something to do with grain vs. grass or marbling or something like that. I don't have any idea. Anyone got any info on this?
« Last Edit: February 22, 2016, 04:05:12 pm by Mr.DeMartino »


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #61 on: February 22, 2016, 04:37:41 pm »
I think it completely mental.

Korean beef-good for Korean food and x beef for x food seems ludicrous.

What if you were told Korean ingredients were used-and then told otherwise after? Does your perception change after finding out the truth?

Korean beef in Japanese dishes, Korean beef in Turkish dishes, and American beef in Argentinian dishes seems less important than how the cow was raised and what part the meat is from.

This reminds me of alcohol and food pairings. The LCBO list(ed) what food you should eat with Asahi beer. Unsurprisingly, it was Japanese food. Is Asahi any better than any other macro lager? I would say, no.


Tl;dr: Nationalism makes people look ridiculous. 
Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP


Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #62 on: February 22, 2016, 04:47:35 pm »
I think it completely mental.

Korean beef-good for Korean food and x beef for x food seems ludicrous.

What if you were told Korean ingredients were used-and then told otherwise after? Does your perception change after finding out the truth?

Korean beef in Japanese dishes, Korean beef in Turkish dishes, and American beef in Argentinian dishes seems less important than how the cow was raised and what part the meat is from.

This reminds me of alcohol and food pairings. The LCBO list(ed) what food you should eat with Asahi beer. Unsurprisingly, it was Japanese food. Is Asahi any better than any other macro lager? I would say, no.


Tl;dr: Nationalism makes people look ridiculous.

Like I said, it may have something to do with grain vs. grass and marbling. I don't really know. Everyone is going to love a piece of beef, and the other 50% is how good the cook is, but there are some things. Like grain vs. grass might affect tenderness or juiciness or flavor. And I look more for juiciness in a burger and tenderness in Korean bbq. I'm sure I'd fail a blindfold or three, but when I've done cooking, Korean beef didn't really work for burgers and stew and the American beef was rather uninspired when it came to the Korean bbq.


Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #63 on: February 22, 2016, 07:55:09 pm »
I think it completely mental.

Korean beef-good for Korean food and x beef for x food seems ludicrous.

What if you were told Korean ingredients were used-and then told otherwise after? Does your perception change after finding out the truth?

Korean beef in Japanese dishes, Korean beef in Turkish dishes, and American beef in Argentinian dishes seems less important than how the cow was raised and what part the meat is from.

This reminds me of alcohol and food pairings. The LCBO list(ed) what food you should eat with Asahi beer. Unsurprisingly, it was Japanese food. Is Asahi any better than any other macro lager? I would say, no.


Tl;dr: Nationalism makes people look ridiculous.

Like I said, it may have something to do with grain vs. grass and marbling. I don't really know. Everyone is going to love a piece of beef, and the other 50% is how good the cook is, but there are some things. Like grain vs. grass might affect tenderness or juiciness or flavor. And I look more for juiciness in a burger and tenderness in Korean bbq. I'm sure I'd fail a blindfold or three, but when I've done cooking, Korean beef didn't really work for burgers and stew and the American beef was rather uninspired when it came to the Korean bbq.

Unless both meats are in the same state, the comparison is useless.  Korean meat is fresh whereas the American will have been frozen, freezing can impair the flavour of meat, especially if frozen for long periods of time.  Also when it comes to ground beef for burgers, the ratio of fat to meat makes a difference.  If you were to butcher the animals yourself and prepare the meats in the same way, then your comparisons may be more valid.

« Last Edit: February 22, 2016, 08:05:38 pm by sligo »


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #64 on: February 23, 2016, 07:55:08 am »
I think it completely mental.

Korean beef-good for Korean food and x beef for x food seems ludicrous.

What if you were told Korean ingredients were used-and then told otherwise after? Does your perception change after finding out the truth?

Korean beef in Japanese dishes, Korean beef in Turkish dishes, and American beef in Argentinian dishes seems less important than how the cow was raised and what part the meat is from.

This reminds me of alcohol and food pairings. The LCBO list(ed) what food you should eat with Asahi beer. Unsurprisingly, it was Japanese food. Is Asahi any better than any other macro lager? I would say, no.


Tl;dr: Nationalism makes people look ridiculous.

Like I said, it may have something to do with grain vs. grass and marbling. I don't really know. Everyone is going to love a piece of beef, and the other 50% is how good the cook is, but there are some things. Like grain vs. grass might affect tenderness or juiciness or flavor. And I look more for juiciness in a burger and tenderness in Korean bbq. I'm sure I'd fail a blindfold or three, but when I've done cooking, Korean beef didn't really work for burgers and stew and the American beef was rather uninspired when it came to the Korean bbq.

Unless both meats are in the same state, the comparison is useless.  Korean meat is fresh whereas the American will have been frozen, freezing can impair the flavour of meat, especially if frozen for long periods of time.  Also when it comes to ground beef for burgers, the ratio of fat to meat makes a difference.  If you were to butcher the animals yourself and prepare the meats in the same way, then your comparisons may be more valid.

Ding ding ding. I've said it before and I'll say it again. USDA prime will taste great in Montana, and subpar in Australia. Australian beef will taste subpar in Korea, Hanu will win out. It's fresh, local, ready to eat. This is the rule for virtually any food. Fresh, never frozen, is better.
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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #65 on: February 23, 2016, 08:40:51 am »
I think it completely mental.

Korean beef-good for Korean food and x beef for x food seems ludicrous.

What if you were told Korean ingredients were used-and then told otherwise after? Does your perception change after finding out the truth?

Korean beef in Japanese dishes, Korean beef in Turkish dishes, and American beef in Argentinian dishes seems less important than how the cow was raised and what part the meat is from.

This reminds me of alcohol and food pairings. The LCBO list(ed) what food you should eat with Asahi beer. Unsurprisingly, it was Japanese food. Is Asahi any better than any other macro lager? I would say, no.


Tl;dr: Nationalism makes people look ridiculous.

Like I said, it may have something to do with grain vs. grass and marbling. I don't really know. Everyone is going to love a piece of beef, and the other 50% is how good the cook is, but there are some things. Like grain vs. grass might affect tenderness or juiciness or flavor. And I look more for juiciness in a burger and tenderness in Korean bbq. I'm sure I'd fail a blindfold or three, but when I've done cooking, Korean beef didn't really work for burgers and stew and the American beef was rather uninspired when it came to the Korean bbq.

Unless both meats are in the same state, the comparison is useless.  Korean meat is fresh whereas the American will have been frozen, freezing can impair the flavour of meat, especially if frozen for long periods of time.  Also when it comes to ground beef for burgers, the ratio of fat to meat makes a difference.  If you were to butcher the animals yourself and prepare the meats in the same way, then your comparisons may be more valid.

Thats a great point that I overlooked.

Now I want a burger...


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #66 on: February 23, 2016, 03:10:11 pm »
I don't think that with even being frozen or non frozen most people would know. I saw a Korean TV show where they had 4-5 chefs from top hotels/restaurants and 4-5 housewives trying to see if they could say which beef was which out of Korean, American and Australian beef. Most of the people incorrectly chose the Australian beef as hanwoo , said the hanwoo was the ozzie beef, and correctly chose the US beef. For the record the both groups scored about the same with the chefs just shading the housewives in the number of correct calls.

Many galbi places unless it states hanwoo specifically on the menu will be serving you Ozzie or US beef. Probably Ozzie as it's cheaper with a better reputation (no mad cow).
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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #67 on: February 23, 2016, 03:18:03 pm »
I don't think that with even being frozen or non frozen most people would know. I saw a Korean TV show where they had 4-5 chefs from top hotels/restaurants and 4-5 housewives trying to see if they could say which beef was which out of Korean, American and Australian beef. Most of the people incorrectly chose the Australian beef as hanwoo , said the hanwoo was the ozzie beef, and correctly chose the US beef. For the record the both groups scored about the same with the chefs just shading the housewives in the number of correct calls.

Many galbi places unless it states hanwoo specifically on the menu will be serving you Ozzie or US beef. Probably Ozzie as it's cheaper with a better reputation (no mad cow).

I'd genuinely like to see this.
Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #68 on: February 23, 2016, 08:00:44 pm »
I don't think that with even being frozen or non frozen most people would know. I saw a Korean TV show where they had 4-5 chefs from top hotels/restaurants and 4-5 housewives trying to see if they could say which beef was which out of Korean, American and Australian beef. Most of the people incorrectly chose the Australian beef as hanwoo , said the hanwoo was the ozzie beef, and correctly chose the US beef. For the record the both groups scored about the same with the chefs just shading the housewives in the number of correct calls.

Many galbi places unless it states hanwoo specifically on the menu will be serving you Ozzie or US beef. Probably Ozzie as it's cheaper with a better reputation (no mad cow).

I have a hard time believing they would air such a program with these results.  Totally going against the 우리나라 agenda.  I would think they would rig the whole show from the beginning, where they would choose Korean beef at least 80-90% of the time since 100% would be suspicious.


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #69 on: February 23, 2016, 10:39:32 pm »
I don't think that with even being frozen or non frozen most people would know. I saw a Korean TV show where they had 4-5 chefs from top hotels/restaurants and 4-5 housewives trying to see if they could say which beef was which out of Korean, American and Australian beef. Most of the people incorrectly chose the Australian beef as hanwoo , said the hanwoo was the ozzie beef, and correctly chose the US beef. For the record the both groups scored about the same with the chefs just shading the housewives in the number of correct calls.

Many galbi places unless it states hanwoo specifically on the menu will be serving you Ozzie or US beef. Probably Ozzie as it's cheaper with a better reputation (no mad cow).

I have a hard time believing they would air such a program with these results.  Totally going against the 우리나라 agenda.  I would think they would rig the whole show from the beginning, where they would choose Korean beef at least 80-90% of the time since 100% would be suspicious.

For us, maybe, but doubtful for their target demo.
Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP


Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #70 on: March 18, 2016, 10:08:05 am »
Breaking news!

Got this email yesterday. The nanny state government of the republic of Samsung have struck.

Did get a free month but that will pretty much be wiped out through foreign transaction fees. 

 


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #71 on: March 18, 2016, 10:23:37 am »
So is it gonna do that crap to anyone who watches it in Korea, or only people with credit cards/billing addresses in Korea? I watch it here, obviously, but my CC and billing address are my parents' place back home.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2016, 10:38:09 am by Mister Tim »


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #72 on: March 18, 2016, 10:34:28 am »
Wow! I was complaining about this yesterday.

Stupid nanny government. Just leave me alone. I'll pay taxes for services, no problem. Just leave me the hell alone otherwise.
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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #73 on: March 18, 2016, 10:37:50 am »
In before anyone says "Just use a VPN".

Shouldn't have to. End of.


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #74 on: March 18, 2016, 10:40:13 am »
In before anyone says "Just use a VPN".

Shouldn't have to. End of.
But what about my Adult Themed Videos?
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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #75 on: March 18, 2016, 10:40:23 am »
In before anyone says "Just use a VPN".

Shouldn't have to. End of.

They're apparently actually cracking down on those now anyway, rather than just threatening to. Some work, some don't, and I imagine what works now might not work next week.

It'd be less frustrating if this region's selection wasn't complete garbage. It's like they WANT me to just torrent everything.


Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #76 on: March 18, 2016, 10:41:51 am »
and thus begins the age of no-one being able to enter their name correctly on the age-verification thingy.



Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #77 on: March 18, 2016, 10:43:57 am »
In before anyone says "Just use a VPN".

Shouldn't have to. End of.

They're apparently actually cracking down on those now anyway, rather than just threatening to. Some work, some don't, and I imagine what works now might not work next week.

It'd be less frustrating if this region's selection wasn't complete garbage. It's like they WANT me to just torrent everything.

Yeah I agree. I orginally deleted Vuze and VLC after getting Netflix with the intention to go cold turkey and get clean.

I've since relapsed.


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #78 on: March 18, 2016, 11:10:15 am »
This is really a non-issue. 

I created a Netflix account using an address from a hotel in Beverly Hills.  Netflix accepted my credit card and I use a VPN to bypass the country filters.

The Korean regulations are as useful now as they were 2 years ago...completely useless and ineffectual.

Carry as as before.  If people here are stupid enough to sign up for a 'Korean' Netflix account, it's on them.  I've been enjoying full American TV here for years without any problems.  Why this is still an issue is surprising.


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Re: Netflix Under Fire from Korean Media
« Reply #79 on: March 18, 2016, 11:15:14 am »
This is really a non-issue. 

I created a Netflix account using an address from a hotel in Beverly Hills.  Netflix accepted my credit card and I use a VPN to bypass the country filters.

The Korean regulations are as useful now as they were 2 years ago...completely useless and ineffectual.

Carry as as before.  If people here are stupid enough to sign up for a 'Korean' Netflix account, it's on them.  I've been enjoying full American TV here for years without any problems.  Why this is still an issue is surprising.

Because as someone said above, they are cracking down on people accessing Netflix with a VPN. It hasn't happened to you and it may not. But over the last 6 weeks or so a few people I know have been contacted and told they can't access Netflix US with a VPN anymore and have to sign up with the local one. Same thing happened in New Zealand when the local one came out there. Gradually all the VPNs became useless.
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