Read 3018 times

  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4811

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Cairo, Egypt (formerly Seoul)


Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2016, 07:59:42 pm »
That's interesting. I got out of it that he wanted Koreans to define what drinking and dining culture is for its own people rather than have something that was inherited from past experiences with Japan and American culture. He also wanted to see if it was possible if what is to be created from ground zero could be globalized unlike soju. He doesn't seem to have faith that the world beyond Korea or Asia would appreciate soju as much as they do sake, beer, etc.

I'm not too offended that he is stating his own observations about drinking and dining culture. It is what it is...


  • maximmm
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1447

    • September 05, 2013, 11:02:44 am
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2016, 08:15:42 pm »
I guess Korea could export its fruit sojus and have a fair amount of success.

Yet, blaming the drinking culture on Japan....  it may have been introduced by Japan (I'm not sure if that's true though), but what happened afterwards, that's all on Korea.  If it wasn't Japan, booze would have entered Korea via elsewhere much to the same effect. 



  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2016, 08:39:09 pm »
This guy is upset at the US for Budae Jjigae and Spam.

If Korea didn't love the above so much, it would never have taken hold here.

I mean, they were starving at the time, but once they gained wealth, they still longed to eat it.

It is still given as a gift, and I don't mean as a "White Elephant" gift, but a genuine gift.

A Korean company bought Spam from Hormel Foods, so it is NOW Korean.

It would be great if they got rid of soju.  Then, on Sundays the buses and subways wouldn't smell so terrible.


  • Loki88
  • Expert Waygook

    • 722

    • July 25, 2014, 08:41:07 am
    • Seoul
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2016, 08:49:06 am »
Anyone who hates budae jigae needs to be staked, have their head cut off, sprinkled with garlic and exposed to sunlight.


  • stan rogers
  • Expert Waygook

    • 577

    • August 03, 2015, 04:16:11 am
    • Jeju Island
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2016, 09:18:17 am »
Whiskey dinking culture was brought to Asia by Americans.


Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2016, 10:29:58 am »
Dude has it all wrong. Korea should embrace the soju and grilled meat aspect of its food. It's modestly priced, gets the job done, and most importantly, is versatile in terms of its price point and allows people of all levels of social status to come together. Chinese food in say, America, can either go cheap or fancy, but generally not in between. And people don't usually drink with Chinese food. Japanese is generally upscale, but its usually either stuffy or filled with hipsters taking photos of their food. The good thing about Korean bbq is that you can find restaurants that range from cheap 5,000 won frozen samgyupsal places with just kimchi and maybe 2 other side dishes up to 50,000 won a serving gourmet places with wagyu beef and a bunch of side dishes and all that.  Also, even at the cheap places, you'll get well-off types going there just to cut loose and watch baseball while having meat and booze. If you look around, people are smiling, laughing, talking, getting loud etc.

The closest thing I can compare Korean food to food back home in terms of atmosphere and all that is Mexican. Mexican can go from cheap to somewhat upscale, but people always go there to have a bit more alcohol than usual and to relax and have fun. Pubs used to be like that, but now the tapas whole foodie crowd has made upscale pub fare a completely different animal.

Korea needs to embrace its food identity. It's fun for all. Have another soju. The one thing they might try to and is some small spaces on the grill where you can fry things up in sauce so hipsters can experiment with different sauce combinations and declare their secret mix the best there is. That and more vegetables for the vegetarians.

 


Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2016, 10:49:41 am »
What I'm looking forward to in returning home to America is all the Hawaiian restaurants which are pretty much owned by mostly Koreans who cook Hawaiian food a lot better than most of my own relatives!

What's strange is, I've never come across a plate lunch here in Korea!



  • grey
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1536

    • April 08, 2011, 04:47:11 am
    • USA
    more
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2016, 10:52:33 am »
It seems like Koreans are yet again trying to make a frog bark, to their detriment.

Maybe the next generation will go with the flow.
Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP


Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2016, 10:56:22 am »
I'm pretty sure Korean drinking culture comes from the Yangban era. Modern Koreans seem to think middle class modernity means aping a yangban elite as much as possible.

As for the soju/beer here, Korean manufacturers know they can sell cheap skunky garbage to Koreans who will lap it up because it's all they're used to, and chaebol-sponsored taroffs and laws means good beer is prohibitively expensive.

But you can get good Andong soju for like $4 a bottle...it's so much better than the green bottle fertilizer runoff Koreans poison themselves with. But Koreans won't drink it, even though they increasingly try expensive foreign beer.


Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2016, 11:25:56 am »
The Mongols introduced soju (then called "arak" and even in some places it continues being called arak-ju/아락주) in the 13th Century.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2734

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2016, 04:09:59 pm »
This guy is upset at the US for Budae Jjigae and Spam.

If Korea didn't love the above so much, it would never have taken hold here.

I mean, they were starving at the time, but once they gained wealth, they still longed to eat it.

It is still given as a gift, and I don't mean as a "White Elephant" gift, but a genuine gift.

A Korean company bought Spam from Hormel Foods, so it is NOW Korean.

I just tried to look this up, and I don't think that's true.  SPAM is certainly a feature of the Hormel website.   http://www.hormelfoods.com/Brands/BrandWall/SPAM-Family-of-Products

However, it has a Korean licensee, CJ CheilJedang, that makes it here. http://www.cj.co.kr/cj-en/brands/spam


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2016, 05:26:40 pm »
Yes, to clarify, a Korean company bought the rights to Spam from Hormel Foods.

What I meant when saying, "Now it is Korean" is because the Spam in Korea is made in Korea and made differently than in the US (not that I have eaten it, I just read about it).  It is softer, 4x times more expensive, etc.

Again, I understand how it caught on.  It was one of the few proteins, along with wieners, the US army personnel left on their plates.  These table scraps were recycled and put to use in a Korean way via a stew.

Though food is still recycled in some restaurants here today, people are no longer starving, yet Spam reigns supreme.

I'm thankfully to have yet to experience that level of struggle and desperation.



  • tamjen
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1180

    • June 19, 2013, 08:08:14 am
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2016, 09:35:44 pm »
This guy is upset at the US for Budae Jjigae and Spam.

If Korea didn't love the above so much, it would never have taken hold here.

I mean, they were starving at the time, but once they gained wealth, they still longed to eat it.

It is still given as a gift, and I don't mean as a "White Elephant" gift, but a genuine gift.

A Korean company bought Spam from Hormel Foods, so it is NOW Korean.

It would be great if they got rid of soju.  Then, on Sundays the buses and subways wouldn't smell so terrible.

Add Kimchi to this sentence...

After nearly 6 years in this country, today I had my very first early Saturday morning subway ride in Seoul.

The stink in the sardine crowded car was overwhelming. There is no way I would be able to do that everyday if I lived in Seoul. I could never have lasted. The stink, the pushing , the shoving, the hawking and spitting...I was absolutely disgusted.

On another note: This quote from the article describes Korea, not just the food and drink part either.

"But the culture -- food or drinks -- we have and say we enjoy at the moment has come or copied from somewhere else, Japan and the U.S., which we really can’t say is our identity.”
Hail Caesar


  • z80
  • Expert Waygook

    • 661

    • August 24, 2014, 07:34:50 pm
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2016, 09:33:20 am »
The thing is that pretty much all "Korean traditional culture" has been made up since the Korean war "ended".

I don't know why they are complaining about it now.


Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2016, 09:37:10 am »
The thing is that pretty much all "Korean traditional culture" has been made up since the Korean war "ended".

I don't know why they are complaining about it now.
"They" aren't complaining about it. One moron wrote an op-ed. I don't think many Koreans share his view and are just fine eating spam and barfing up soju.


  • z80
  • Expert Waygook

    • 661

    • August 24, 2014, 07:34:50 pm
Re: Korean dining and drinking culture blamed on... you guessed it.
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2016, 10:07:46 am »
I'm eating spam right now :-(