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Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #20 on: September 08, 2016, 06:23:12 am »
38000usd pay? Is that all?

It's more than the starting salary of UK teachers and, I assume, is taxed at a much lower rate. Plus there is housing provided.

Look at who you're replying to.  :rolleyes:

yeah point taken
I'm a qualified secondary teacher with 10 years UK experience. Thanks but no need to do a point taken or look who you're replying to(have only been here 2 odd weeks so what u talking about). SFS starting salary is 45000US with free accommodation if recruited from overseas or if you already living here no accommodation. whatever it is a low salary for an international subject teacher. Free accommodation is just standard for any international school anywhere unless it's say Spain or an EU school. For teachers just starting, yes it's an ok salary but for experienced teachers, it's too low.

now now Martin, no need to fib!


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #21 on: September 08, 2016, 08:07:16 am »
I have some genuine questions if I may...

If I have a primary education QTS, is it possible to work in an international middle or high school? Or vice versa?

Would a NQT (Newly Qualified Teacher) be accepted? Or is it better to have the 12 months work experience back home?

How long is vacation?

Weighing up my options on getting a teaching cert or not these days. If I was 25, I'd be all for it, but at 35 it's a big decision. I'm planning to settle here, so would like a job with a long term future.


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #22 on: September 08, 2016, 08:54:58 am »
38000usd pay? Is that all?

It's more than the starting salary of UK teachers and, I assume, is taxed at a much lower rate. Plus there is housing provided.

Look at who you're replying to.  :rolleyes:

yeah point taken
I'm a qualified secondary teacher with 10 years UK experience. Thanks but no need to do a point taken or look who you're replying to(have only been here 2 odd weeks so what u talking about). SFS starting salary is 45000US with free accommodation if recruited from overseas or if you already living here no accommodation. whatever it is a low salary for an international subject teacher. Free accommodation is just standard for any international school anywhere unless it's say Spain or an EU school. For teachers just starting, yes it's an ok salary but for experienced teachers, it's too low.

They why are you not making the "BIG BUCKS"? Why are you slumming it at a Hagwon?  :laugh: :laugh:


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #23 on: September 08, 2016, 11:11:57 am »
Because i want to teach adults where there are no classroom management problems. Not all teachers make "big bucks"

I am not slumming it away. I'm having a cushy time teaching 1-4 students per class and teach 2 classes on tues and thurs atm due to
not enough students signing up for ielts.

I am looking at making 3m a month within the next 6 months which is the same as the op s 38k salary almost.


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #24 on: September 08, 2016, 08:14:55 pm »
I understand that international schools are ideally looking for native teacher certification + a relevant major/master + two years of experience teaching in a home country.

But which is more important for getting a job? The relevant major/master, or the two years of experience teaching in a home country? Unfortunately I majored in Economics, and I'm interested in teaching either Elementary students or science.

I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get a relevant masters+certification, but I wouldn't want to work at the same time. Likewise, I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get certified+teach in USA, but I wouldn't want study for a masters at the same time.  And I'd rather not waste 4 years in order to fill both requirements.

I'm very confident in my ability to pick up new jobs so I'm not concerned about which path would be better for me professionally. I just want to know which path would be better for getting an entry level international school job.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 08:43:00 pm by robobob9000 »


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #25 on: September 08, 2016, 08:22:58 pm »
Quote
I am looking at making 3m a month within the next 6 months which is the same as the op s 38k salary almost.

Looks like that might have to be at a different school or even country, judging by what you wrote on Dave's

Quote
I am just a bit worried about my school in korea. They have asked the teachers to discuss how to get more adult students in the next meeting. We are down to about 10 students each 3 times a week per teacher (3 x teachers). The boss has another business as well as the school and so far we are being paid. Should I look for a job in China incase anything goes wrong?


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #26 on: September 08, 2016, 09:04:16 pm »
No cos the salary,s the same no matter how many students. I just have another thing cropped up to make some extra money


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #27 on: September 08, 2016, 09:21:05 pm »
No cos the salary,s the same no matter how many students. I just have another thing cropped up to make some extra money

Legally?


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #28 on: September 08, 2016, 10:24:12 pm »
Because i want to teach adults where there are no classroom management problems. Not all teachers make "big bucks"

I am not slumming it away. I'm having a cushy time teaching 1-4 students per class and teach 2 classes on tues and thurs atm due to
not enough students signing up for ielts.

I am looking at making 3m a month within the next 6 months which is the same as the op s 38k salary almost.
Do you even look at the exchange rate?  Currently 3mil/month is right around $2745, over the course of 12 months that's not even 33K for the year. 


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #29 on: September 08, 2016, 10:40:04 pm »
I understand that international schools are ideally looking for native teacher certification + a relevant major/master + two years of experience teaching in a home country.

But which is more important for getting a job? The relevant major/master, or the two years of experience teaching in a home country? Unfortunately I majored in Economics, and I'm interested in teaching either Elementary students or science.

I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get a relevant masters+certification, but I wouldn't want to work at the same time. Likewise, I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get certified+teach in USA, but I wouldn't want study for a masters at the same time.  And I'd rather not waste 4 years in order to fill both requirements.

I'm very confident in my ability to pick up new jobs so I'm not concerned about which path would be better for me professionally. I just want to know which path would be better for getting an entry level international school job.
I don't know if this will help but here's the path I went down.  My undergrad had nothing to do with education.  While in Korea I spent one year at a hogwon and 5 1/2 years total at two private elementary schools in Seoul.  While working, I got a masters degree in curriculum and instruction from a brick and mortar school, done completely online.  I also did a teacher certification course completely online (though I did have to go to my home country to take the certification tests).  I now teach at an international school, though not in Korea.  I know another guy who left for Korea right after university, taught in Korea for over a decade, studied online, went to his home country for 6 months to finish up his certification, and is now teaching high school at an international school.  In my opinion, the only thing that really matters is the certification and how well you sell yourself.


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #30 on: September 08, 2016, 10:42:38 pm »
I deal in pounds not dollars.It's currently 2062 a month or about 24000 a year. That's what the average teacher makes back home before tax. After 23% tax that's 5520 leaving 18480. THEN you also have NI contributions to pay which are around 250 a month or so so another 3000 a year(who ever says the NHS is free is talking a load of BS, we pay insurance just like you do in America really) leaving 15480 in your pocket. So what you on about that's not EVEN $33k???? It's more than the average teacher makes back home in the UK after tax and NI.


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #31 on: September 08, 2016, 10:51:37 pm »
I understand that international schools are ideally looking for native teacher certification + a relevant major/master + two years of experience teaching in a home country.

But which is more important for getting a job? The relevant major/master, or the two years of experience teaching in a home country? Unfortunately I majored in Economics, and I'm interested in teaching either Elementary students or science.

I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get a relevant masters+certification, but I wouldn't want to work at the same time. Likewise, I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get certified+teach in USA, but I wouldn't want study for a masters at the same time.  And I'd rather not waste 4 years in order to fill both requirements.

I'm very confident in my ability to pick up new jobs so I'm not concerned about which path would be better for me professionally. I just want to know which path would be better for getting an entry level international school job.
I don't know if this will help but here's the path I went down.  My undergrad had nothing to do with education.  While in Korea I spent one year at a hogwon and 5 1/2 years total at two private elementary schools in Seoul.  While working, I got a masters degree in curriculum and instruction from a brick and mortar school, done completely online.  I also did a teacher certification course completely online (though I did have to go to my home country to take the certification tests).  I now teach at an international school, though not in Korea.  I know another guy who left for Korea right after university, taught in Korea for over a decade, studied online, went to his home country for 6 months to finish up his certification, and is now teaching high school at an international school.  In my opinion, the only thing that really matters is the certification and how well you sell yourself.
You ought to be careful. A lot of international schools don't recognise online teacher certifications. At least from a british perspective they don't recognise this PGCEi thing from Nottingham uni. That's an online PGCE course that some teachers have got.I am currently applying to an international school in HK and they specifically say on their website that they don't accept the PGCEi. You might be talking about American international schools though. I don't know anything about them. You would find it difficult getting into a british curriculum school however with those qualifications/ They take British teachers usually though so it probably doesn't matter. Interesting that you can get a masters from a brick and mortar (proper school?) school online in the US. You don't really need a masters anyway if you're teaching at british international schools and others even. Must be American internationals then.


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #32 on: September 08, 2016, 11:35:08 pm »
I deal in pounds not dollars.It's currently 2062 a month or about 24000 a year. That's what the average teacher makes back home before tax. After 23% tax that's 5520 leaving 18480. THEN you also have NI contributions to pay which are around 250 a month or so so another 3000 a year(who ever says the NHS is free is talking a load of BS, we pay insurance just like you do in America really) leaving 15480 in your pocket. So what you on about that's not EVEN $33k???? It's more than the average teacher makes back home in the UK after tax and NI.

Really?  You're dealing in pounds?
38000usd pay? Is that all?
SFS starting salary is 45000US with free accommodation if recruited from overseas or if you already living here no accommodation.
Oh I forgot, it's just 10,000USD more than a basic EFL teacher gets here and if you do privates or are on more than just a basic EFL salary, you could earn 38000USD just doing easy TEFL whereas at an international school, you'd be pressured 5 days a week with meetings and many reports to write etc etc . That's why it's low for an international school It's OK for an NQT I guess though but why go all the way from the UK to earn the same amout of money? The reason for going international is to get a much higher salary. One teacher I know of earns 100,000 USD in Vietnam of all places (so she said on a proper teacher's forum)

The point I was trying to make was that you stated you were going to be making 3mil/month, which was basically the same thing as 38K USD a year, whereas the current exchange rate doesn't back that up.


Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #33 on: September 08, 2016, 11:43:16 pm »
I understand that international schools are ideally looking for native teacher certification + a relevant major/master + two years of experience teaching in a home country.

But which is more important for getting a job? The relevant major/master, or the two years of experience teaching in a home country? Unfortunately I majored in Economics, and I'm interested in teaching either Elementary students or science.

I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get a relevant masters+certification, but I wouldn't want to work at the same time. Likewise, I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get certified+teach in USA, but I wouldn't want study for a masters at the same time.  And I'd rather not waste 4 years in order to fill both requirements.

I'm very confident in my ability to pick up new jobs so I'm not concerned about which path would be better for me professionally. I just want to know which path would be better for getting an entry level international school job.
I don't know if this will help but here's the path I went down.  My undergrad had nothing to do with education.  While in Korea I spent one year at a hogwon and 5 1/2 years total at two private elementary schools in Seoul.  While working, I got a masters degree in curriculum and instruction from a brick and mortar school, done completely online.  I also did a teacher certification course completely online (though I did have to go to my home country to take the certification tests).  I now teach at an international school, though not in Korea.  I know another guy who left for Korea right after university, taught in Korea for over a decade, studied online, went to his home country for 6 months to finish up his certification, and is now teaching high school at an international school.  In my opinion, the only thing that really matters is the certification and how well you sell yourself.
You ought to be careful. A lot of international schools don't recognise online teacher certifications. At least from a british perspective they don't recognise this PGCEi thing from Nottingham uni. That's an online PGCE course that some teachers have got.I am currently applying to an international school in HK and they specifically say on their website that they don't accept the PGCEi. You might be talking about American international schools though. I don't know anything about them. You would find it difficult getting into a british curriculum school however with those qualifications/ They take British teachers usually though so it probably doesn't matter. Interesting that you can get a masters from a brick and mortar (proper school?) school online in the US. You don't really need a masters anyway if you're teaching at british international schools and others even. Must be American internationals then.
Lucky for me then that mine says State of (insert your state here) Department of Education at the top, and not, Beware! the course work for this certificate was done online and with a certified teacher mentor supervising this teacher's work.  I probably dodged a bullet there.


  • brenng87
  • Adventurer

    • 43

    • March 03, 2016, 12:44:46 pm
    • Cheonan
Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #34 on: September 09, 2016, 07:54:07 am »
I understand that international schools are ideally looking for native teacher certification + a relevant major/master + two years of experience teaching in a home country.

But which is more important for getting a job? The relevant major/master, or the two years of experience teaching in a home country? Unfortunately I majored in Economics, and I'm interested in teaching either Elementary students or science.

I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get a relevant masters+certification, but I wouldn't want to work at the same time. Likewise, I wouldn't mind taking two years off to get certified+teach in USA, but I wouldn't want study for a masters at the same time.  And I'd rather not waste 4 years in order to fill both requirements.

I'm very confident in my ability to pick up new jobs so I'm not concerned about which path would be better for me professionally. I just want to know which path would be better for getting an entry level international school job.
I don't know if this will help but here's the path I went down.  My undergrad had nothing to do with education.  While in Korea I spent one year at a hogwon and 5 1/2 years total at two private elementary schools in Seoul.  While working, I got a masters degree in curriculum and instruction from a brick and mortar school, done completely online.  I also did a teacher certification course completely online (though I did have to go to my home country to take the certification tests).  I now teach at an international school, though not in Korea.  I know another guy who left for Korea right after university, taught in Korea for over a decade, studied online, went to his home country for 6 months to finish up his certification, and is now teaching high school at an international school.  In my opinion, the only thing that really matters is the certification and how well you sell yourself.
You ought to be careful. A lot of international schools don't recognise online teacher certifications. At least from a british perspective they don't recognise this PGCEi thing from Nottingham uni. That's an online PGCE course that some teachers have got.I am currently applying to an international school in HK and they specifically say on their website that they don't accept the PGCEi. You might be talking about American international schools though. I don't know anything about them. You would find it difficult getting into a british curriculum school however with those qualifications/ They take British teachers usually though so it probably doesn't matter. Interesting that you can get a masters from a brick and mortar (proper school?) school online in the US. You don't really need a masters anyway if you're teaching at british international schools and others even. Must be American internationals then.

This is not the case with American certification through online means. As long as you can doing student teaching at the same time you can get an online certification through TeacherReady or another. With Teacher Ready you get certification in Florida without any indication of how you got it.


  • ado
  • Adventurer

    • 58

    • August 30, 2012, 07:58:30 am
    • Yeongwol
Re: Working at an international school in Seoul AMA
« Reply #35 on: October 26, 2016, 01:36:42 am »
What are the shortage subjects here? I'm trying to find a job as a newly qualified teacher and wondering if maths or physics is more sought after.

As for UK headteacher I've seen your post on a certain teacher forum so no need to pretend to be high and mighty.