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The IT dept in NH Bank...
« on: October 01, 2015, 09:54:41 am »
Do they enjoy making their internet banking website totally unusable once every six months?

They've called themselves 'Funbank' now but after four days of trying to login, the fun is wearing a little thin now.




Re: The IT dept in NH Bank...
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2015, 12:41:47 pm »
Not sure what to say.  Take a pic of the message that's popping up.  Then, go into Nonghyup bank, where you know someone speaks Engflish and get them to call their IT dept or whatever dept and they can prob suggest something to fix it.  I got referred to some Korean website.  Something to do with the keystroke.  ANyhow, he gave me a print out of the webpage and circled the icons I was to click.  It fixed the problem.  Happens to me every couple of months, but now I just pull out the sheet and fix it again and I'm good to go. 


Re: The IT dept in NH Bank...
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2015, 01:05:03 pm »
I called them. It's an issue with Chrome and they recommend I use IE, which as a mac user is a non starter.



  • podes88
  • Adventurer

    • 52

    • September 23, 2011, 04:53:14 pm
Re: The IT dept in NH Bank...
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2015, 01:19:21 pm »
Do they enjoy making their internet banking website totally unusable once every six months?

They've called themselves 'Funbank' now but after four days of trying to login, the fun is wearing a little thin now.

Use Korean banks as little as possible. I do all my transfers at an ATM by my house, and use bitcoin to transfer cash home. It's easier and I don't have to pay absurd fees.

I made and account on korbit, and connected it to my korean bank account. Made an account on circle and connected it to my US bank account. I then transfer cash from my korean bank account to my korbit account (ATM bank transfer), and buy bitcoins. Then I transfer them to my circle account, sell the coins and transfer the cash to my US bank. The first time or two it takes a few days for the transfers to process.


Re: The IT dept in NH Bank...
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2015, 02:19:51 pm »
Strange.  I have used Chrome, though not on a Mac before.  I mostly use explorer, though.  Is there and IE version for Mac?  Thought there use to be years ago.  Korean banks can be annoying, though I found the new Nonghyup site over the past year or so to be pretty decent compared to past programs. 


Re: The IT dept in NH Bank...
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2015, 02:25:01 pm »
The NH site was pretty good until it completely broke with Windows 10. Now it's corrupted all my computer's certificates and as far as I know there's no easy way to fix it save for a reformat or some deep registry witchcraft..


  • z80
  • Expert Waygook

    • 661

    • August 24, 2014, 07:34:50 pm
Re: The IT dept in NH Bank...
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2015, 02:28:57 pm »
Even the mention of NH makes my blood boil.

But you need to see them for what they are.

First, Korean software. No Korean software follows any sort of design rules that the rest of the world does. Korean software is designed to be as obtrusive as possible, probably to remind you that it's there. They often copy large portions of code from other programs with out fully understanding what it does. All Koreans use internet explorer and windows. If you use Mac or Linux, then get your self a copy of windows 7, and use virtual box for banking. In fact even if you use windows, it's a good idea to use a VM just to stop your computer being filled with crapware.

Korean banks have no idea on security. They subscribe to the "security though obscurity" method, and of course it doesn't work. Korean banks generally have very poor security based on early 90's technology and are broken into regularly by "Chinese and North Korean" hackers (actually mostly Russian hackers), so they have a bunch of things they make you do so that people feel safe. For people from an IT background, next time you are in a Korean bank, watch their screens as much as you can. It's so funny. You'll see things that will scare you, like their computers are logged in with admin privileges.

Second, Korean banks are not actually banks as we know them. Many NH banks would actually be called a co-operative bank, community bank, or a credit union in our own countries. Many of them have no facilities for dealing with what they think are complex transactions. Many of the branches operate as almost separate banks. Some services are connected, others are not. Also you need to realize that non-Korean banks spend millions to develop software that their people can use even if they don't know or have never done a task before. They use a system where they break down a repeatable task and document it. In Korea the culture is that people who know how to do something are not willing to share so that they look better at their job than other people.

Third, Korea banks take very little responsibility for your money should something go wrong. For example, people who have had their internet banking broken into and funds transferred out are unlikely to get their money back. While the government does cover deposits to bank accounts in some of the larger banks, many of us who bank with the smaller co-operative style banks, even though they may look like an NH brand or other brand, we would not in fact be covered by the government directly. Technically how ever you are covered no mater what bank you bank with, realistically, you're not.

Basically, use Korean banks as little as possible and don't store your life savings in there.


**TL;DR - Get virtual box, and a copy of windows 7 with IE.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2015, 02:31:20 pm by z80 »


  • KSJ27
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • April 08, 2015, 05:23:32 am
    • Orange County, CA, USA
Re: The IT dept in NH Bank...
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2015, 09:21:33 am »
Do they enjoy making their internet banking website totally unusable once every six months?

They've called themselves 'Funbank' now but after four days of trying to login, the fun is wearing a little thin now.

Use Korean banks as little as possible. I do all my transfers at an ATM by my house, and use bitcoin to transfer cash home. It's easier and I don't have to pay absurd fees.

I made and account on korbit, and connected it to my korean bank account. Made an account on circle and connected it to my US bank account. I then transfer cash from my korean bank account to my korbit account (ATM bank transfer), and buy bitcoins. Then I transfer them to my circle account, sell the coins and transfer the cash to my US bank. The first time or two it takes a few days for the transfers to process.

Would love to learn more about how you are doing this! Think I could PM you regarding this subject matter? Thanks!