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  • CO2
  • The Legend

    • 4872

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
    more
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5080 on: May 10, 2018, 07:37:42 am »
Chart of languages and countries.

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/world-of-languages.html
Why isn't England in the English section??? Is it the unlabeled purple section next to Malaysia?
The joys of fauxtherhood


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4169

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5081 on: May 10, 2018, 08:59:19 am »
Chart of languages and countries.

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/world-of-languages.html
Why isn't England in the English section??? Is it the unlabeled purple section next to Malaysia?
Included in the UK section, I presume.


  • CO2
  • The Legend

    • 4872

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
    more
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5082 on: May 10, 2018, 09:07:29 am »
Why isn't England in the English section??? Is it the unlabeled purple section next to Malaysia?
Included in the UK section, I presume.
[/quote]

I am an idiot. hahahaha It's not even like I didn't know that the UK is the overarching place, I didn't even........... see it? I need more sleep.
The joys of fauxtherhood


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4169

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5083 on: May 10, 2018, 09:13:17 am »
Why isn't England in the English section??? Is it the unlabeled purple section next to Malaysia?
Included in the UK section, I presume.

I am an idiot. hahahaha It's not even like I didn't know that the UK is the overarching place, I didn't even........... see it? I need more sleep.
[/quote]

Also, the purple section labeled + is "others".


Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5084 on: May 10, 2018, 09:56:40 am »
Kyndo got the skills to pay the bills.

Who is here in 2019?


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1469

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5085 on: May 10, 2018, 10:22:06 am »
I know you're all going to hit me with a 1000 reasons why I'm wrong.
Here's one reason.



I'm not understanding the picture TBH. I'm not sure if it's just going over my head, I'm still too tired to think about it enough, or if I'm just a dumb-dumb head. :o (probably the latter)


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1469

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5086 on: May 10, 2018, 10:41:33 am »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5397

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5087 on: May 10, 2018, 11:41:59 am »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.




  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4169

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5088 on: May 10, 2018, 12:39:44 pm »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1469

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5089 on: May 10, 2018, 12:47:20 pm »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

I've just started learning hangul recently. The teachers that come to my teachers workshop, are trying to help me by telling me the names of the hangul. But personally, I'm feeling like it isn't helping. When they start telling me the names. It is confusing me to no end. Maybe once I'm better versed with the hangul, and am ready for the sounds of them, it'll be a big help though!


  • CO2
  • The Legend

    • 4872

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
    more
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5090 on: May 10, 2018, 12:50:38 pm »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

I've just started learning hangul recently. The teachers that come to my teachers workshop, are trying to help me by telling me the names of the hangul. But personally, I'm feeling like it isn't helping. When they start telling me the names. It is confusing me to no end. Maybe once I'm better versed with the hangul, and am ready for the sounds of them, it'll be a big help though!

It is helpful though because a ㅂ isn't always a ㅂ. haha. Like 밥 is not bab. It's bap. ㅂ at the beginning is b, at the end it's a p sound. Which is why the letters are called 비읍, Bi-eup. 리을 Ri-eul etc
The joys of fauxtherhood


Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5091 on: May 10, 2018, 12:54:40 pm »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

I've just started learning hangul recently. The teachers that come to my teachers workshop, are trying to help me by telling me the names of the hangul. But personally, I'm feeling like it isn't helping. When they start telling me the names. It is confusing me to no end. Maybe once I'm better versed with the hangul, and am ready for the sounds of them, it'll be a big help though!

Actually, learning the names will help a lot, as the name is the sound it represents at the top, then the bottom of the syllable you write.


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1469

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5092 on: May 10, 2018, 01:02:28 pm »
I'm of the opinion that people are either [naturally] good at pronunciation or they're not (though, like with most skills, I do think that repeated exposure and practice can potentially lead to improvement).  I taught kids way out in the boonies where hagwons don't exist and [English speaking] foreigners are exceptionally rare.  I was pleasantly surprised at how [relatively, yes] good a lot of the kids' pronunciations were.  Many were able to follow and repeat pretty darn well my way of pronouncing things.  And yes, some students did have heavier Korean accents than others. 

Some languages do not Romanize well.  Korean is one of them.  Similarly, applying the Korean way of pronouncing things onto other languages such as English generally just does not yield good results.  I'm not opposed to struggling, low English level students using hangeul because I'd rather the students participate and feel included.  But once anyone gets past the basics (whether for English or Korean or whatever), I think it's more detrimental than beneficial to continue using one's native language as a crutch.

I'm in a spot like that now. My new first graders have great pronunciation.
Actually, one of my co-teachers is a young Korean lady. Her pronunciation is pretty good too. Yesterday in class, she was helping the super low level student, and she mistakenly sad "Dog-gu" instead of "dog". We both, and the students as well, had a pretty good laugh at that haha.

I rarely use hangul in my lessons. The rare times I do use it, is I have something in one of my ppt slides of something that is very difficult to explain simply. And it's never used for pronunciation, just for them to understand what it is (by reading the Korean word of it).
I think that some minimum of hangeul can be helpful with, as you mentioned, difficult concepts etc.

I also like to point out that transliterations of English words into Korean script using Korean writing conventions inevitably lead to atrocities like "아이스크림" I encourage students to use hangeul in a linear way to prevent the addition of a bajillion additional syllables: "ㅏㅣㅅㅋㄹ ㅣㅁ".  The kids get a kick out of it, and it emphasizes how the pronunciation of the two languages is fundamentally different.

That's awesome.

I know myself that when I read Korean, I always think of ㅎ as H, etc., because I never learned the names of Korean letters. Thinking in syllables led to a big jump in my Korean reading speed, even though compression is still very weak.

I've just started learning hangul recently. The teachers that come to my teachers workshop, are trying to help me by telling me the names of the hangul. But personally, I'm feeling like it isn't helping. When they start telling me the names. It is confusing me to no end. Maybe once I'm better versed with the hangul, and am ready for the sounds of them, it'll be a big help though!

It is helpful though because a ㅂ isn't always a ㅂ. haha. Like 밥 is not bab. It's bap. ㅂ at the beginning is b, at the end it's a p sound. Which is why the letters are called 비읍, Bi-eup. 리을 Ri-eul etc

Yeah, I understand that. But it's not helping me, personally. When they call it Bi-eup, Ri-eul or whatever. I just get confused and makes it harder, for me personally, to learn. The book I'm learning from, while it doesn't use the hangul names, what it does do, is give me rules on how to use them: like the beginning is a 'b' sound and a 'p' sound at the end.


  • zola
  • The Legend

    • 2880

    • September 30, 2012, 06:56:11 am
    • Korea
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5093 on: May 11, 2018, 07:48:40 am »
We had a visit from our Provincial Education Superintendent this week.  My students were a little dumbfounded by a: he comes in a chauffeur-driven car and b: he gets makeup put on him when he gets out of the car.  :rolleyes:
It's amazing the things like that, that people with even a little bit of power in this country get.
At the uni I used to work at, the President also had a chauffer driven car. Every morning his lackeys would be waiting for him to arrive. They would open his door for him, give him a cup of something, tea or coffee i guess, as soon as he stepped out of the car, and rush beside him with their heads lowered as he walked the few feet to his office. If it was raining they would drive round the back of the building and up the wheelchair ramp so as to not get a single drop of rain on this poor guy's head.

The foreign teachers were presented with some certificate for our "excellent work". We had to go into his office. It was like a royal court. Plebs running around, opening and closing things, pulling out his chair, picking up his pen and handing it to him, so that he didn't have to lower his wrist like 7cm. All this for the president of a small-mid sized, provincial univeristy with a couple of thousand students.

When I was at uni, back in the mists of time, it was one of the biggest in the Southern hemisphere, top 100 ranked in the world, with about 35,000 attending. The Chancellor would ride the bus to work each day.
Kpip! - Martin 2018


Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5094 on: May 11, 2018, 02:41:19 pm »
I made an Native English Teacher Bingo board. I'm attaching the word file so have at it if you are so inclined.

« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 02:44:20 pm by robin_teacher »


  • yirj17
  • The Legend

    • 2782

    • September 16, 2015, 02:23:16 am
    • Korealand
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5095 on: May 11, 2018, 03:00:39 pm »
I made an Native English Teacher Bingo board. I'm attaching the word file so have at it if you are so inclined.

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Is this meant to be played within one day or what? 

My condolences for those who get bingo if the former. 

There are only about 8 of these I haven't experienced (got 3 bingos!)  :laugh:


Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5096 on: May 11, 2018, 03:04:54 pm »
I made an Native English Teacher Bingo board. I'm attaching the word file so have at it if you are so inclined.

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Is this meant to be played within one day or what? 

My condolences for those who get bingo if the former. 

There are only about 8 of these I haven't experienced (got 3 bingos!)  :laugh:

Oh yeah, this is daily bingo. I'm having a productive day, as you can see.


  • Mister Tim
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1587

    • September 08, 2013, 10:33:54 am
    • SK
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5097 on: May 11, 2018, 03:16:58 pm »
*Sees an interesting thread has been bumped.*

*Almost clicks it.*

*Sees it was bumped by ESL Turtle.*

*Finds something else to do instead.*


  • zola
  • The Legend

    • 2880

    • September 30, 2012, 06:56:11 am
    • Korea
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5098 on: May 11, 2018, 03:17:57 pm »
*Sees an interesting thread has been bumped.*

*Almost clicks it.*

*Sees it was bumped by ESL Turtle.*

*Finds something else to do instead.*


 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

He's alright. He's trying.
Kpip! - Martin 2018


  • JVPrice
  • Expert Waygook

    • 798

    • August 29, 2017, 10:26:13 am
    • Cheongju
Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #5099 on: May 12, 2018, 08:24:03 am »
Not sure if getting tonsillitis this week was a blessing or curse.

I got to skip all except for one day of class, but the pain sucks. Hooray for the low healthcare costs, I guess?
The World Ends With You