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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #400 on: October 06, 2015, 08:55:39 am »
The bus ride home after work has become so unbearable that I decided to take a taxi home today, to see how much more it'd cost me to that every afternoon rather than taking the bus. I figured I don't live all that far, so it shouldn't be too bad.

Boy, was I wrong. It was quite literally ten times more expensive to take a taxi.

Guess it's back to taking the bus and putting every ounce of self control I have into not murdering anyone.

Sigh.

Ugh. the bus is the absolute worst. My school is on a big mountain and the busdrops me at the bottom and i used to do the daily hike. One day i just thought enough is enough and now I take a taxi every day, luckily it only costs me about 5,000 won

Be strong! dont let the bus get you down  :P

So glad I drive, even though folks here drive like @$$!!  Took me nearly 3 years to get use to it and even sometimes I still want to go postal on folks when driving.  It's just not as often as before and I can channel some inner numbness.  Of course, I'm not from Toronto, New York, or where ever. 


  • Mister Tim
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #401 on: October 06, 2015, 08:59:26 am »
If getting my license here wasn't such a faff and if I had enough job security to know that I had a steady job for more than a year, I'd seriously consider driving. It is a faff, though, and I've already almost lost my job and had to leave the country twice now because of budget cuts, so I think I'll hold back on getting a car.

Plus Korean traffic terrifies me, and I just know that if I'm ever involved in an accident, the police and insurance companies will side with the Korean driver involved, even if it was entirely their fault.  :laugh:


  • nomadicmadda
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #402 on: October 06, 2015, 09:10:39 am »
If getting my license here wasn't such a faff and if I had enough job security to know that I had a steady job for more than a year, I'd seriously consider driving. It is a faff, though, and I've already almost lost my job and had to leave the country twice now because of budget cuts, so I think I'll hold back on getting a car.

Plus Korean traffic terrifies me, and I just know that if I'm ever involved in an accident, the police and insurance companies will side with the Korean driver involved, even if it was entirely their fault.  :laugh:

I drive here and am about to go through the process of getting my Korean license.  Such a pain in the ass.  You even have to bring your own photos, which for some reason is the most annoying part to me haha.  I should be able to exchange my license, but I wasn't originally planning on driving when I came here, so I didn't get it notarized before I came   :cry:


  • kyndo
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #403 on: October 06, 2015, 09:18:34 am »
If getting my license here wasn't such a faff and if I had enough job security to know that I had a steady job for more than a year, I'd seriously consider driving. It is a faff, though, and I've already almost lost my job and had to leave the country twice now because of budget cuts, so I think I'll hold back on getting a car.
Really? I've heard that getting a driver's licence is fairly easy here... especially for certain nationalities like Canadian: just trade in your existing home countries' license and take the Korean one that they give you in return. Even for other nationalities, i hear that all they require is that you pass a written test (which is in English).

Of course, all this information is hearsay so I would love for somebody to comment to either confirm or deny...

Plus Korean traffic terrifies me, and I just know that if I'm ever involved in an accident, the police and insurance companies will side with the Korean driver involved, even if it was entirely their fault.  :laugh:

I've been thinking about getting a car as well, and I have the same fears. One thing that I absolutely will do if I get a car is immediate buy a dashcam and make sure that I can backup the video on short notice if need be. Here's a great example of why (thanks Z80 for making me paranoid):

I have parked illegally once. It was to assist some old guy pulling a cardboard box cart who was hit by a BMW that didn't stop.

For some reason I just instantly faced my cars dash cam to the incident (I had caught the first bit where he got hit), and it was a good thing too, as someone later accused me of running over the man.  ALWAYS COPY YOUR VIDEO BEFORE THE POLICE ARRIVE. The easiest way to do this is to have a microsd to mini usb reader, and copy it to your phone, then upload to google drive. The police have no problems helping them self to your microsd card. The police then some how lost my video of the incident.  When I told them I had a second copy of the video they suddenly turned from "Your an evil bad rude westerner who can't possibly understand the traditional aspects of Korean driving" to trying to down play what they had said to me.
 
Stupid things like this could also explain why no one is willing to help when they see something bad happening.


« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 10:33:30 am by kyndo »


  • Mister Tim
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #404 on: October 06, 2015, 09:33:14 am »
Really? I've heard that getting a driver's licence is fairly easy hear... especially for certain nationalities like Canadian: just trade in your existing home countries' license and take the Korean one that they give you in return. Even for other nationalities, i hear that all they require is that you pass a written test (which is in English).

Of course, this is hearsay, and I would love somebody comment to confirm or deny...

It's fairly easy to just exchange your native one for a Korean one, but that's just a temporary thing. If you plan on having one long-term, it's better to get an actual Korean license, which involves a written test and a driving test. The written test is available in English, but from what I've heard (at least in my province/city), the driving portion is only available in Korean. I'm not completely inept at speaking Korean, but I don't think I'm quite "official driving test"-able  ;D.

Even if the exchange one for the other deal wasn't a short-term thing, they now require a notarized/apostilled/whatevered copy of your home license before they'll exchange it. They didn't require that when I first moved here, so I don't have it. My home license is actually expired now, so I'll have to back to the US to renew it, then go to my state capitol to have it apostilled, and then come back to Korea to exchange it for a temporary Korean one  :laugh:.

So yeah. A bit of a faff.


  • Imogen1991
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #405 on: October 06, 2015, 09:41:26 am »
I have no intention of staying here past the 1 year mark so its not really worth it for me! i just accept that taxis are part of my outgoings


  • JNM
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #406 on: October 06, 2015, 10:02:14 am »
It's fairly easy to just exchange your native one for a Korean one, but that's just a temporary thing. If you plan on having one long-term, it's better to get an actual Korean license, which involves a written test and a driving test. The written test is available in English, but from what I've heard (at least in my province/city), the driving portion is only available in Korean. I'm not completely inept at speaking Korean, but I don't think I'm quite "official driving test"-able  ;D.

Even if the exchange one for the other deal wasn't a short-term thing, they now require a notarized/apostilled/whatevered copy of your home license before they'll exchange it. They didn't require that when I first moved here, so I don't have it. My home license is actually expired now, so I'll have to back to the US to renew it, then go to my state capitol to have it apostilled, and then come back to Korea to exchange it for a temporary Korean one  :laugh:.

So yeah. A bit of a faff.

Negative on the temporary thing.  My exchanged license is good for 10 years, and is no different than any local Korean license.   An International License is good for the life of your license, however, is only good for a year in any particular country - perhaps this is what you were referring to.

Canadians can get their license verified at the Embassy.   It costs about C$50 (credit card or money order only - no cash).  It is kind of silly, because they don't verify it - they witness your Oath that it is genuine and not suspended.





Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #407 on: October 06, 2015, 10:15:46 am »
Really? I've heard that getting a driver's licence is fairly easy hear... especially for certain nationalities like Canadian: just trade in your existing home countries' license and take the Korean one that they give you in return. Even for other nationalities, i hear that all they require is that you pass a written test (which is in English).

Of course, this is hearsay, and I would love somebody comment to confirm or deny...

It's fairly easy to just exchange your native one for a Korean one, but that's just a temporary thing. If you plan on having one long-term, it's better to get an actual Korean license, which involves a written test and a driving test. The written test is available in English, but from what I've heard (at least in my province/city), the driving portion is only available in Korean. I'm not completely inept at speaking Korean, but I don't think I'm quite "official driving test"-able  ;D.

Even if the exchange one for the other deal wasn't a short-term thing, they now require a notarized/apostilled/whatevered copy of your home license before they'll exchange it. They didn't require that when I first moved here, so I don't have it. My home license is actually expired now, so I'll have to back to the US to renew it, then go to my state capitol to have it apostilled, and then come back to Korea to exchange it for a temporary Korean one  :laugh:.

So yeah. A bit of a faff.

Not sure if things changed.  Was relatively straigh tforward except I had to trek all the way up to Seoul to get a form from my embassy confirming my driver's licence.  Of course the Canadian embassy has first world rip off prices and third world service.  Only open mornings, so it's a trip up and a hotel stay the night before.  Then a fee I have to pay just for them to print a form saying they looked at my licence and it appears to be a licence.  Stupid really, but not difficult.  Just inconvenient.  Brought it to my provincial capital city and they gave me a very brief eye exam and then they exchanged it.  I brought a pic or had one taken in a booth there.  Can't remeber.  It's good for 9 years.  Got it in 2010. 

The fee on the Korean side was cheap.  The fees of going up to Seoul and the embassy fees were the most expensive part.  But, it's a real licence.  You get it and can get car insurance like any Korean. 

Driving in a rural area can be a pleasure except for the odd old geyser who just pulls out  without looking or slams on the brakes at the last minute and turns with no blinker.  But generally, you can get across your gun (군) fairly quickly.  Once you get into cities above 250 to 300 thousand people or more is when it can grate on you.  They become like miniturized versions of Seoul. There's inadequate infrastructure, too many cars, folks illegally parked further constricting traffic, @$$hats who get in the fast lane and drive too slow (speed limit is 50 or 60 and they get in front of you and drive 20 or 30), folks that drive too slow in all 2 or 3 lanes and then box you in when you try to pass them, folks that sit in their cars scratching their @$$ when they should be driving after the light has turned green (but sit there and wait and wait and wait and then go) and make you miss the light by the time you get to it, and more examples.

It's these slow and inept drivers who should learn to either drive in only the slow lane or get off the road and have their licences revoked.  It also causes other drivers to become frustrated and aggresive trying to get around them and make up for lost time.  Slow drivers like that are suppose to pull over and let the other cars pass in Canada or stick to the slow lane.  Otherwise, they'll get a fine.  But, here, I guess not.  They can get in any lane and be inconsiderate.  It use to really drive me insane at the lame stupidity.  But, I guess I'm mostly numb to it. 

I also look for patterns such as a car driving too slow up ahead of me.  I'll try to speed and pass them.  I'll get back in front of them before getting to the next light.  When the light turns green, I'm not stuck waiting behind them to get going, I can go right away.  I'll also drive into the right hand lane at intersections and the cars behind can beep all they want.  I'm not getting into a single lane almost a km long just so a few folks can turn.  I do little things to get ahead of the rush and avoid at least some of the @$$hattery here. Korea has turned me into a far more aggressive driver.  I've figured at least half the drivers here prob drive normal like me and get just as irritated at the slow moving, inept, time delayed, no blinker using idiots.

Sometimes, I wil use courtesy, such as letting aperson pull infront ofme ifthey have their signal light on so long as they don't drive slow in front me once they get in front of me.  You also have to butt out into traffic gradually, but don't do it if you see a car goingtoo fast of course.  That's just common sense. (Though some stunned idiots will do that here and not only pull out in front of you but then proceed to drive 20 km/hr.  Not sure sure why they couldn't wait until I had gone by when they see I was driving 60 km/hr.)  So, butt out especially if it's slow moving traffic and if somecars try to not let you out, stick your nose out and keep beeping your horn aggressively at them till someone lets you out.  I understand why some drivers here become so aggresive due to all the really inept drivers on the road.  Some care are prob afraid I'll be one of them if they let me out.  But, you do have to be a little bit assertive, just not wreckless and crazy.  Cars that drive 90 or 100 on a 60/km hr road here really do need to lose their license for a long time.   That's stupidity, especially on the roads here when some dipstick will switch lanes or pull out orslam on the brakes and turn all with no bliker.  Lots of variables. 


On the other hand, the expressways (not near Seoul) and the country roads are a pleasure to drive with low traffic.  Also, once you get use to it and the traffic patterns and can begin to predict behaviour and get use to sitting in your car idoling for a long time at some lights, you do eventually tolerate it much more.  In spite of what I described above, I'm not really in an angry rage about it like I would have been 2 years ago.  Also, it would take me an hour to get to workby bus due to stupidity of routes and wanting to route through the center of the city instead of going direct.  Driving gets me there in 25 minutes, though in Canada, it would probably be 10 minutes for the same distance. 


  • nomadicmadda
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #408 on: October 06, 2015, 10:28:59 am »
Really? I've heard that getting a driver's licence is fairly easy hear... especially for certain nationalities like Canadian: just trade in your existing home countries' license and take the Korean one that they give you in return. Even for other nationalities, i hear that all they require is that you pass a written test (which is in English).

Of course, this is hearsay, and I would love somebody comment to confirm or deny...

It's fairly easy to just exchange your native one for a Korean one, but that's just a temporary thing. If you plan on having one long-term, it's better to get an actual Korean license, which involves a written test and a driving test. The written test is available in English, but from what I've heard (at least in my province/city), the driving portion is only available in Korean. I'm not completely inept at speaking Korean, but I don't think I'm quite "official driving test"-able  ;D.

Even if the exchange one for the other deal wasn't a short-term thing, they now require a notarized/apostilled/whatevered copy of your home license before they'll exchange it. They didn't require that when I first moved here, so I don't have it. My home license is actually expired now, so I'll have to back to the US to renew it, then go to my state capitol to have it apostilled, and then come back to Korea to exchange it for a temporary Korean one  :laugh:.

So yeah. A bit of a faff.

I'm going to take it next weekend, so I'll let you know how it goes, but my friend took it last November and he was able to take the driving portion in English!  We've down in Jeollanamdo, which is served by the Naju DMV.

And you're exactly right about the notary.  The embassies used to let you notarize them there once you were in Korea, but they no longer offer that now.  My Canadian friend originally exchanged his that way but said that a year or two ago his American friend tried to do the same, and they stopped offering the notary service there.

..I'm actually up in Seoul this weekend.  Can anyone verify for sure that the American embassy does or doesn't notarize for the exchange?  Would save me so much of a hassle.


  • Mister Tim
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #409 on: October 06, 2015, 10:32:14 am »

Negative on the temporary thing.  My exchanged license is good for 10 years, and is no different than any local Korean license.   An International License is good for the life of your license, however, is only good for a year in any particular country - perhaps this is what you were referring to.

Must've been the the international license thing I was thinking of, yeah.

Canadians can get their license verified at the Embassy.   It costs about C$50 (credit card or money order only - no cash).  It is kind of silly, because they don't verify it - they witness your Oath that it is genuine and not suspended.

The US embassy doesn't do that. For a US license, you need an apostille from the State that issued the license. That's something I could probably have a courier do for me, but like I said, my license has expired since moving here anyway. I'd have to go back home to renew it before I could have it verified anywhere. Having to go to Seoul to get something verified at an embassy would PITA enough (I don't live anywhere near Seoul), having to go to the US first just makes it more trouble than it's worth  :laugh:.

Actually, browsing this bit about it on Korea4expats...

http://www.korea4expats.com/article-driving-licences-korea.html

...it would seem I'd be SOL anyway. To exchange your license for a Korean one, you need to be from a country that recognizes Korean licenses, or in the case that you're from the US, your individual State has to recognize Korean licenses, or you can't exchanges yours. If the list on that site is accurate, my home state doesn't recognize Korean licenses, so my US license wouldn't do me any good here even if it wasn't expired.

Soooooo yeah. PITA all around, hahaha.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 10:35:15 am by Mister Tim »


  • Mister Tim
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #410 on: October 06, 2015, 10:36:32 am »

..I'm actually up in Seoul this weekend.  Can anyone verify for sure that the American embassy does or doesn't notarize for the exchange?  Would save me so much of a hassle.

"If you are from the United States*, as of 1 January 2013, an apostille** from the state in which your license was issued is required - the US Embassy no loner provides notary certification for US issued drivers licenses. "

http://www.korea4expats.com/article-driving-licences-korea.html

 >:(


  • nomadicmadda
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #411 on: October 06, 2015, 10:40:36 am »

..I'm actually up in Seoul this weekend.  Can anyone verify for sure that the American embassy does or doesn't notarize for the exchange?  Would save me so much of a hassle.

"If you are from the United States*, as of 1 January 2013, an apostille** from the state in which your license was issued is required - the US Embassy no loner provides notary certification for US issued drivers licenses. "

http://www.korea4expats.com/article-driving-licences-korea.html

 >:(

....Dammit.  That's what I thought too. :cry:


  • krissyboo75
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #412 on: October 07, 2015, 07:48:53 am »
I went into the hospital yesterday for a shoulder checkup and after an x-ray and walking around for 3 weeks in a painful sling, my doctor told me that he was wrong, it was not just a dislocated shoulder like he thought, it was ruptured ligaments. I am now scheduled for surgery in 2 days. And its scheduled for the same day I had surgery on for my knee last year. Heck and bother.

Hope it goes well! Also, remember to always get a second opinion if you are doubtful.


  • denimdaze
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #413 on: October 16, 2015, 12:45:25 pm »
My 6th graders are civilized.  My 5th graders not so much.  Why does a year make such a difference?


  • krissyboo75
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #414 on: October 16, 2015, 12:50:15 pm »
My 6th graders are civilized.  My 5th graders not so much.  Why does a year make such a difference?
I personally feel like 6th graders are too old to be the elementary school scene. Back home 6th grade is middle school and I really do think its more fitting.


  • kiki_3d
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #415 on: October 16, 2015, 01:28:58 pm »
My 6th graders are civilized.  My 5th graders not so much.  Why does a year make such a difference?
I personally feel like 6th graders are too old to be the elementary school scene. Back home 6th grade is middle school and I really do think its more fitting.

My elementary schools (I moved a few times) all went to grade 7. There were no middle schools in the towns I lived in.


  • iseya
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #416 on: October 16, 2015, 01:35:51 pm »
Korean Weddings. 
what the hell?  How do you guys mess up weddings SO bad? 
I just went to my first one, and it was as bad as people have told me they are.  If the one I went to was typical, then weddings here are meaningless ceremonies/photo ops.
  People talked during the ceremony, attended in t-shirts and sweats, everything was rushed, there was no time to speak with the bride and groom, no toasts, no speeches, no mingling, and the food was the same typical Korean food you would have expected to find at any cafeteria. The entire thing was maybe an hour and 10 minutes, tops.

I'm really puzzled as to why weddings are the way they are here. 
Koreans are super close with their families, and they like to drink. 
There literally is no better time than a wedding to get your drink on and spend time with family.   


  • Imogen1991
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #417 on: October 16, 2015, 01:59:21 pm »
My 6th graders are civilized.  My 5th graders not so much.  Why does a year make such a difference?

4th and 5th grade are definitely the best. i dont understand how the insane wild animal 3rd graders turn into lovely 4th graders. and I'm similarly confused how the 5th graders who are always so eager to learn turn into the 6th graders that literally can hardly bare to open their mouths to speak a single sentence in class


  • iseya
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #418 on: October 16, 2015, 02:06:49 pm »
haha I had the exact same thought.  Of all the things Korea decided to under produce on...they went with weddings...arguably the most important day of one's life.
Everything else lasts allllllllllll day longggg--school trips, festivals, meetings, orientations, etc. There is copious amounts of drinking and thigh rubbing after games of volleyball between a bunch of old men--but can't muster up the time and energy to put in that same time for a once (hopefully) in a life time family event? 

I almost wanted to take back my money envelope because I could've gotten a better social experience and food at a Burger King. 
Won't fool me again, Korea.


  • Pennypie
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Re: A thread for pointless Friday ramblings.
« Reply #419 on: October 16, 2015, 02:17:11 pm »
Korean Weddings. 
what the hell?  How do you guys mess up weddings SO bad? 
I just went to my first one, and it was as bad as people have told me they are.  If the one I went to was typical, then weddings here are meaningless ceremonies/photo ops.
  People talked during the ceremony, attended in t-shirts and sweats, everything was rushed, there was no time to speak with the bride and groom, no toasts, no speeches, no mingling, and the food was the same typical Korean food you would have expected to find at any cafeteria. The entire thing was maybe an hour and 10 minutes, tops.

I'm really puzzled as to why weddings are the way they are here. 
Koreans are super close with their families, and they like to drink. 
There literally is no better time than a wedding to get your drink on and spend time with family.

Yeah I don't get it. It's so sad. You'd think a bride would want to have a long (or at least meaningful) ceremony with her closest friends and family, and be able to plan it all out perfectly to her tastes. I asked my co teacher if she would have a wedding in a wedding hall and she said yes because it's easier. SINCE WHEN DO KOREANS MAKE ANYTHING EASY. WHY IS A WEDDING THE ONE THING THEY DONT TURN INTO A HUGE COMPLICATED ORDEAL

I asked my co teachers this once because I went to one of their weddings and I was shocked at how shite it was.

She said that the quick wedding started within the last 10/15 or so years (I can't really remember but it started fairly recently) because now many people work super long hours and sometimes over the weekends. The families miss on a more meaningful ceremony but the co workers / bosses/ friends of friends and distant family who feel obligated to attend now don't have to waste their precious free time at an all day wedding. It is pretty sad.