Read 7586 times

  • sheila
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 1480

    • November 23, 2009, 08:32:58 am
    • Gangnamgu, Seoul
Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« on: April 29, 2015, 12:26:18 pm »
This is a thread for any lesson material for Judy Yin (전재교육 2015 edition) Middle School English 3 Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It? Please share your contributions here. Be sure to explain exactly what you are posting and please do not post multi-level materials in this thread. Also, any review lessons or materials should be posted in the review section for this grade.  Best of luck in your lesson planning!
Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard!
www.freerice.com


Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2015, 05:30:22 am »
Lesson in a nutshell:

Esta lección está diseñada con y sin ayuda co- profesor.

I. For Rebus Puzzles - http://www.fun-with-words.com/rebus_puzzles_01.html

II. Introduce Lesson 4: Problem / Acknowledgment / Advice (I should have...)

III. Letter C in the book

IV. Video Practice and Review - http://film-english.com/2015/03/20/the-gift/

V. Review Lesson


For the introduction of this unit, I combine several websites onto PowerPoints and create a lesson from it. My schools have just had test so one week before this lesson, I had a video lesson on the theme "perseverance" so this week looking at this unit, we are still on video lessons that include Q&A.

First few minutes I go over 4 REBUS PUZZLES. I pass out white boards and in small groups they first have to write down as many prepositions as they can think of. Why? On this website: http://www.fun-with-words.com/rebus_puzzles_01.html the REBUS PUZZLES use prepositions. I give out tickets to teams with higher numbers of prepositions and then explain the four puzzles.

Second, I introduce today's lesson by introducing the dialogue in the book. I tell them the dialogue includes: 1) a problem 2) acknowledgement of the problem 3) advice. Since the book covered problem and advice, I tell the students the "advice" this time is "self advice". One co-teacher recommend the word "regret" instead of "advice". Both work, and the focus for the students is "I should have..." or "I could have..."

Third, we look at section C of the book. I give the students time to practice with their partners. Then we go over the four dialogues with volunteers. The emphasis is on "I should have...." So if a student doesn't talk loud on "I should have..." They must repeat it louder.

Transition, in the book there is a picture of a birthday present page 72. My question: "what do you give people on their birthday?" (a present / a gift). Okay we are going to watch a video called "The Gift" ....

Fourth, we watch a preview video: http://film-english.com/2015/03/20/the-gift/ {also found at https://vimeo.com/60493091 - 0:40} and {https://vimeo.com/59179537 - 7:40} Usually, I show the video once up to the 6 minute mark. For Americans, this video may seem like to much love is in it. However, I justify showing it by explaining that violence is so "well received" that a video about love is "not well received" because it is so uncommon in popular entertainment. Example: Mad Max: Fury Road is in theaters at the time of this posting and it's pure violence getting a 98% fresh rating at Rotten Tomatoes. {This is only a point to be made and reflex neither pro violence nor anti violence leanings} An underlying point is that how many PC rooms can you walk into with something exploding?

Watching with questions, no on the second time I show the video I stop at different points and have students answer questions. I pass out white boards so they can work in groups and I decide who has the best answer among groups. You can give time limits and that is great. However, make sure to include difficult vocabulary in your question. For example, at 2:08 in the video, "Who GIVES the GOOD present?" (The woman does) "What does she GIVE?" (she gives flowers) "Are the flowers SMALL or BIG?" (They are big flowers). Including the word "GIVE" "SMALL" "BIG" helps the higher and lower level students use the image and create a sentence on their whiteboard.

Fifth and finally, depending on the situation, you can review "I should have..." and do Part A and B. Choose the best sentence among all the groups and review them as a class. I go over lesson B and emphasize the usage of "I should have..." in the listening sections. This part goes faster since it will be near the end of class.



Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2015, 01:35:21 pm »
Lesson in a nutshell:

Esta lección está diseñada con y sin ayuda co- profesor.

I. For Rebus Puzzles - http://www.fun-with-words.com/rebus_puzzles_01.html

II. Introduce Lesson 4: Problem / Acknowledgment / Advice (I should have...)

III. Letter C in the book

IV. Video Practice and Review - http://film-english.com/2015/03/20/the-gift/

V. Review Lesson


For the introduction of this unit, I combine several websites onto PowerPoints and create a lesson from it. My schools have just had test so one week before this lesson, I had a video lesson on the theme "perseverance" so this week looking at this unit, we are still on video lessons that include Q&A.

First few minutes I go over 4 REBUS PUZZLES. I pass out white boards and in small groups they first have to write down as many prepositions as they can think of. Why? On this website: http://www.fun-with-words.com/rebus_puzzles_01.html the REBUS PUZZLES use prepositions. I give out tickets to teams with higher numbers of prepositions and then explain the four puzzles.

Second, I introduce today's lesson by introducing the dialogue in the book. I tell them the dialogue includes: 1) a problem 2) acknowledgement of the problem 3) advice. Since the book covered problem and advice, I tell the students the "advice" this time is "self advice". One co-teacher recommend the word "regret" instead of "advice". Both work, and the focus for the students is "I should have..." or "I could have..."

Third, we look at section C of the book. I give the students time to practice with their partners. Then we go over the four dialogues with volunteers. The emphasis is on "I should have...." So if a student doesn't talk loud on "I should have..." They must repeat it louder.

Transition, in the book there is a picture of a birthday present page 72. My question: "what do you give people on their birthday?" (a present / a gift). Okay we are going to watch a video called "The Gift" ....

Fourth, we watch a preview video: http://film-english.com/2015/03/20/the-gift/ {also found at https://vimeo.com/60493091 - 0:40} and {https://vimeo.com/59179537 - 7:40} Usually, I show the video once up to the 6 minute mark. For Americans, this video may seem like to much love is in it. However, I justify showing it by explaining that violence is so "well received" that a video about love is "not well received" because it is so uncommon in popular entertainment. Example: Mad Max: Fury Road is in theaters at the time of this posting and it's pure violence getting a 98% fresh rating at Rotten Tomatoes. {This is only a point to be made and reflex neither pro violence nor anti violence leanings} An underlying point is that how many PC rooms can you walk into with something exploding?

Watching with questions, no on the second time I show the video I stop at different points and have students answer questions. I pass out white boards so they can work in groups and I decide who has the best answer among groups. You can give time limits and that is great. However, make sure to include difficult vocabulary in your question. For example, at 2:08 in the video, "Who GIVES the GOOD present?" (The woman does) "What does she GIVE?" (she gives flowers) "Are the flowers SMALL or BIG?" (They are big flowers). Including the word "GIVE" "SMALL" "BIG" helps the higher and lower level students use the image and create a sentence on their whiteboard.

Fifth and finally, depending on the situation, you can review "I should have..." and do Part A and B. Choose the best sentence among all the groups and review them as a class. I go over lesson B and emphasize the usage of "I should have..." in the listening sections. This part goes faster since it will be near the end of class.

 :huh:


Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2015, 02:53:55 pm »
Do they speak English in what?


Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2015, 08:25:34 am »
So here's what I was able to throw together for Listening 1. Obviously my PPT is modeled off of 올리버-uh's PPTs. I love how simple but effective they are so I tried to go with that.

And at the beginning of the PPT is a word wall game (from a thread somewhere here on Waygook, I'll link it when I find it). You can just delete that slide.

Attached is also a Connect Four game and a pair matching handout. For the handout, I've been splitting them into groups, having them find the matches, and then playing Memory with them.

Oh yeah and I've add a comic strip thing that we're using for an open class next week. I haven't used it in any of my classes yet so if you do use it, let me know how it works out.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2015, 08:41:12 am by mixedinkorea »


  • Kingeudey
  • Veteran

    • 244

    • December 16, 2010, 08:57:02 am
    • Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2015, 06:49:17 pm »
I haven't put this together in a full lesson yet, but it should be easy enough.  I can't think of the other commercials, but I know there are more.  Snickers?
Anyway, this is working with the 3rd conditionals, Would have, should have, and could have.  They are all used in the same instances with very little difference.  Our book focuses on Should have.
Take a look and see what you like.
There are a few other Specsavers commercials out there but they seemed a bit too risque for middle school.


  • Kingeudey
  • Veteran

    • 244

    • December 16, 2010, 08:57:02 am
    • Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2015, 06:57:48 pm »
Here's a couple more.
They "should have had a snickers" because they couldn't focus and they had no energy.
Fun stuff.



  • Kingeudey
  • Veteran

    • 244

    • December 16, 2010, 08:57:02 am
    • Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2015, 07:07:02 pm »
There are a bunch of these on youtube as well.
HISHE  (How it should have ended)

They're a little long at 3 minutes or so a piece, and there is a lot of language, but parts could be used.  It looked like there were plenty of them so you could pick the ones that the kids have probably seen.



  • themoge
  • Adventurer

    • 61

    • August 24, 2013, 02:48:40 pm
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2015, 10:18:27 am »
I made a Memory Match game for Listen & Speak 1

Have them line up the black backed cards in one grid, and the "I should have..." cards in another grid (print the pages double sided to make these). Then, going in order, one student takes a black card, reads it, then takes a "I should have..." card, and reads it too. If they match (give each group several answer reference cards that can be printed from slide 9 so they can check the answers), then they keep the cards for one point, and go again.

Hope this helps!


Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2015, 09:04:00 am »
My students absolutely loved this video about kids expressing their opinions.
It goes along with part 2: Don't you think so?
I would stop the video and check if they understood what the kids were saying.


  • Kingeudey
  • Veteran

    • 244

    • December 16, 2010, 08:57:02 am
    • Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2015, 08:49:29 am »
I did this just briefly with my 3rd graders last week.  It was more difficult using just the sheet, so I made a ppt with a variety of the same questions and a couple of my own.  More could easily be added if you wanted to start very simply.

But they seemed to enjoy it..and when it got to the mandatory military question, they became quite emphatic (boys of course) and some of the girls even changed their minds.

Good stuff.


  • themoge
  • Adventurer

    • 61

    • August 24, 2013, 02:48:40 pm
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2015, 09:11:52 am »
And here are some Go Fish cards I made for Listen & Speak 2.

I just had them say "I think ________. What do you think?" (based on what the card says), and then had the person being spoken to either answer "I think so, too" if they have the card and then give it, or "I don't think so" and then the person who asked will draw a card from the middle.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2015, 02:50:30 pm by themoge »


  • yamloaf
  • Adventurer

    • 26

    • July 15, 2015, 11:13:51 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #12 on: June 21, 2016, 12:48:18 pm »
Speak Out 2- Opinions

I started with my powerpoint, which shows a picture of a roller coaster. And I said "this looks fun- don't you think so?"And I got students who agreed to put up their hands, and then I got the students who disagreed to put up their hands and I asked them "why?"
They usually responded "it looks scary" or how it would make them sick.

And then I asked I showed a picture of raw octopus and said "this looks gross, don't you think?" No one agree- they all thought I was crazy.
(and for the record, I do like raw octopus- I just put this here for interest)

And then I put them in groups of four and gave them a deck of cards with opinionated statements on them. One student picks up a card, reads it to the group and then that student secretly picks an "I think so" or "I don't think so" piece of paper out of a cup. The other students have to guess what the student's opinion is.  It was a pretty simple and easy game.

Afterwards, I got my As levels to do the worksheet attached. They have to explain their opinion and find someone with the opposite. They are all pretty dedicated students and get into things like that.
B levels I played I vocabulary bingo game because the ct wants me to just to fun simple things with those students. The bingo cards have words on them and the students take turns drawing a picture the bag and try to figure out what word on their bingo card it is. And then you can get them to complete the worksheet. My cts have found this bingo game makes their other classes easier because students seem to remember the vocab.

I got some questions from the 4 Corners Games that Kingeudey on this thread made.

« Last Edit: June 21, 2016, 12:50:27 pm by yamloaf »


  • yamloaf
  • Adventurer

    • 26

    • July 15, 2015, 11:13:51 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #13 on: June 21, 2016, 01:09:33 pm »
Speak Out 1- Regrets

This is my lesson for my lowest level classes (which, I think, on the whole, are still prettty good). For higher classes, I didn't prep them nearly as much, they had more freedom and even the game cards were more complex.

For my low levels, I reviewed some vocab words that I felt were essential for the lesson. And we reviewed certain verbs and the past participial form. I gave them the vocab worksheet, which has pictures, and I showed the list of words to match to them on my ppt. Then we reviewed the verbs listed at the bottom and I tried to get them to remember/guess both the simple past and  past participial form of the words (get-got-gotten). My B classes didn't need the options  to guess from and my A classes didn't need the verb review at all.

Then I went through the power point. First I showed a problem and got the students to describe the problem. I wrote this on the board ("I failed my test"). And then I asked them (with the help of my ct), "what could you have done different to not fail?" in which they reply "study!" And I write study on the board and tried to ask a few more questions to see if anyone could get the form of the full sentence "I should have studied more.."
They did better than I thought.
Then we did the same thing with a couple other of the slides I prepared.
"I missed the bus. I should have gotten up earlier. I should have run faster. I should have looked at the schedule"

And then we played a game. I put them in groups of four and gave them cards with regrets on them. Then I would show a problem on the ppt. The first group to find and read an matching regret got three points. If another team then read another matching regret they got two points and so on. Each problem has more than only applicable regret.

As I said before, this was a lower level class, so I the repeated the examples we did together as a class in the game. Higher level classes got all new problems.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2016, 08:05:59 am by yamloaf »


  • cmteacher
  • Waygookin

    • 15

    • October 17, 2016, 03:09:18 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2017, 10:04:35 am »
So here's what I was able to throw together for Listening 1. Obviously my PPT is modeled off of 올리버-uh's PPTs. I love how simple but effective they are so I tried to go with that.

And at the beginning of the PPT is a word wall game (from a thread somewhere here on Waygook, I'll link it when I find it). You can just delete that slide.

Attached is also a Connect Four game and a pair matching handout. For the handout, I've been splitting them into groups, having them find the matches, and then playing Memory with them.

Oh yeah and I've add a comic strip thing that we're using for an open class next week. I haven't used it in any of my classes yet so if you do use it, let me know how it works out.

Good simple, effective powerpoint, but it's actually should have + past participle (p.p.), not should have + past tense. :)


Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2017, 09:26:03 am »
Here's a memory matching game for Listen and speak 1.

It's short so just used to supplement any of the above lessons that may be too short, but they seem to enjoy it a lot.


  • kimchikiwi
  • Veteran

    • 161

    • September 12, 2011, 03:55:45 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2017, 09:40:43 am »
I have an extra week of this unit so I plan on warming up with a few 'What's the Word?' slides found here http://www.waygook.org/index.php/topic,80445.0.html
Then I'll do a review worksheet of should have/shouldn't have on one side and opinions on the other. Opinions will lead into group discussions.
Next is a comparisons game where the students try to match the answer with the teacher by writing the sentences down. Easy but fun.
Finally I'll show the Epic or Fail video with students trying to guess what will happen. I think it will be epic./ I think it will fail. You can even extend that into He/she should have... shouldn't have... if you want to.


  • cmteacher
  • Waygookin

    • 15

    • October 17, 2016, 03:09:18 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #17 on: June 29, 2017, 08:32:24 am »
GRADE 3, UNIT 4.2 (Listen & Speak)

This is for Listen & Speak 2. Inspired by others but with a new game included.

Warm-up: Exam discussion
Review: 4.1
Learn: New expressions. They were very vocal about all the food examples.
Textbook: parts A & B
Speaking practice: They read the dialogue from the board with a partner.
Game: "Opinionated". Similar format to Apples to Apples. Each round there is a reader. The reader chooses an opinion card and reads it to the group. Each person then decides "I think so, too" or "I don't think so" (including the reader). Everyone counts down from 3 and then shows their cards. If you agree with the reader, then you get a point. If everyone disagrees with the reader, then the reader gets a point. The person with the most points after reading through all the cards is the winner. I've included the explanation and a few examples in the powerpoint. You can find the opinion/agree/disagree cards in there as well.

My kids got really into this game! It can definitely be adapted for lower levels as well -- just use very simple opinions. After they finished with the cards I even witnessed a couple groups making up their own opinions to keep the game going...very happy with how it turned out!

Hope this helps someone!


  • treeclouds
  • Waygookin

    • 12

    • February 08, 2017, 12:32:04 am
    • Brighton
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2018, 12:58:08 pm »
Listen and Speak 1: Should have

I've used a lot of materials from here so wanted to share what I have cos this one worked pretty well (gonna upload on Kshare as well if I can work it out).

PPT goes through Should have and should not have. I usually pick on people to answer each question for practice then do the first bit of the book then there's a game at the end. Funny fail videos (that are linked to specific times from the pictures). I had two teams and whoever can put their hand up and say "He should have /should not have..." correctly wins a point.

Happy teaching.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2018, 09:55:49 pm by treeclouds »


  • jda100
  • Newgookin

    • 1

    • September 06, 2012, 07:54:19 am
    • Gwangju, Korea
Re: Lesson 4: Do You Really Need It?
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2018, 03:06:24 pm »
Thank you!