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  • Paul
  • Featured Contributor

    • 2055

    • September 21, 2010, 10:28:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Deeva Jessica's English Lessons
« Reply #40 on: October 19, 2015, 12:59:13 pm »
Nope, I've had misunderstandings with those very words (and conning vs cunning). It's why I used them as an example.

You know the vowel sound in 'cunning' is different from the one in 'corn' or is it the same in US English?

Gidget is on the money here. It's dialectal in Korean. Korean doesn't really distinguish between a short /ɒ/ and a short /˄/. Both can be 어, which to make matters worse also often stands in for a trailing schwa in hangeulised English. The further south you get, the closer 어 is to /ɒ/ whereas in Seoul it's a very clear /˄/. Even textbooks tend to use these interchangeably (older Korean texts almost always state /ɒ/ whereas a lot of newer books state /˄/).

Students obviously need to know the difference between their English vowels, but it's difficult to explain in the best of situations. The /ɒ/ /ɔː/ merger in con/corn is a different thing though, and related to certain localised American dialects, not L1 interference.

in the video here name is "Jassica"

Well spotted! :laugh:

As for the video itself, I think Robobob nailed it. I wish her well; I mean, it sure beats mokbang.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2015, 01:07:47 pm by Paul »
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Re: Deeva Jessica's English Lessons
« Reply #41 on: October 19, 2015, 02:37:37 pm »
Quote
Gidget is on the money here. It's dialectal in Korean. Korean doesn't really distinguish between a short /ɒ/ and a short /˄/. Both can be 어, which to make matters worse also often stands in for a trailing schwa in hangeulised English. The further south you get, the closer 어 is to /ɒ/ whereas in Seoul it's a very clear /˄/. Even textbooks tend to use these interchangeably (older Korean texts almost always state /ɒ/ whereas a lot of newer books state /˄/).

I know, but he was talking about 'corn' and 'con', not 'con' and 'cun'. Read the posts before. If a Korean has to say 'con' he will have no problem. He will not say 'corn artist' instead of 'con artist'. Geddit?

Let's face it he's so unlikely to say either of them her English 'lesson' is all but redundant anyway
« Last Edit: October 19, 2015, 02:42:44 pm by eggieguffer »


  • Paul
  • Featured Contributor

    • 2055

    • September 21, 2010, 10:28:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Deeva Jessica's English Lessons
« Reply #42 on: October 19, 2015, 03:03:22 pm »
Ah, my mistake. I missed his initial post.

But you make a very good point. The best correction for a student mispronouncing 'cunning' would be "No, that's Konglish. Use the word 'cheating'." :wink:
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