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  • cragesmure
  • Super Waygook

    • 300

    • October 01, 2010, 06:57:21 am
    • Yeosu
Good article.  It's particularly interesting because it shows the complexity of Korea's biases.  However, I will say that this isn't news.....or maybe it is for the people who spend their days with their heads in the sand...or up their posteriors?

I remain amazed at how clueless this society is of diversity.  Today (9 months into the job, mind you...)...one of my ss asked me if I was from Africa.  I explained that I'm American.  Then another said, oh but your skin.  Then I explained that black ppl are all over the world....Yes, in 2011 I had to explain that....*sigh

I guess its hard for me to comprehend this level of ignorance bc I'm from a multicultural society so I try to ease up on the judgment. But I'm like, really? In 2011 in the age of the internet and HD television you still think all black people are from Africa?

*...expand your economy all you want, Korea.  You still have a looooonggg  way to go....

 ::)

Come to think of it, I guess this IS news for SOME Koreans bc their ignorance CLEARLY shows that they spend their days with their heads in the sand and up their posteriors.
While I agree with your points, I feel that this is a little harsh.  I don't think I've ever met a person who was born in Korea that was not of Korean descent. 

My daughter was born in Korea and is not Korean.  She is American and nothing else.  All her blood is mine and  my fathers and his fathers' fathers', and so on. 

Korean-american?  No.  She is American. 

I was born in Germany and some of my family are German, but I am NOT German.  I am American.

When my daughter has children, no matter where they are born, they will be American.

Who wants to be anything else that has American blood than an American?  nobody....

BTW, I've known some Phillipinos who have had kids here and their kids are definitely NOT Korean and they DO NOT want Korean citizenship for their kids.  Why would they? 

What's the benefit of being Korean?  cragesmure?  I mean, really???  Unless you are from North Korea, there is no benefit of being recognized as a South Korean citizen.  Unless you are one of those desperate few trying to gain F-visa status without being married to a South Korean.....  sad
Haha.  Miss the point, much?



I remain amazed at how clueless this society is of diversity.  Today (9 months into the job, mind you...)...one of my ss asked me if I was from Africa.  I explained that I'm American.  Then another said, oh but your skin.  Then I explained that black ppl are all over the world....Yes, in 2011 I had to explain that....*sigh

Just curious, have you ever referred to yourself as African-American and if so why?

Korean students are often more advanced than their foreign teachers give them credit. Hagwon students cover some pretty in-depth stuff. It's possible your student just read something that used the term "African-American" and didnt fully understand that term. It's actually a very nuanced idea that I wouldn't expect a student to fully understand.


Good question.  This was a 5th grader so I haven't discussed race and nationality with them but I have discussed it with my 6th graders and explained the nuances of heritage and nationality within american society to them. 

InWhen referring to my race, though, I usually just say black. 

Again, I realize I'm from a multicultural society and am looking at it from that perspective so I don't mean to come across as harsh.  It's just hard for me to grasp the idea that in such an advanced society, where Prsident Obama's visit to Korea was all over the news, and kids yell, "Obama" when they see a picture of him....and they know he has a black american wife....and they know who Hussein Bolt is and know that he's from Jamaica...and know who Beyonce is, and know she's American....and many ppl watch American shows that usually at least have black extras....I still constantly get asked if I'm Africa...I mean its not like they're in a country that JUST got electricity last week and are just now opening up to the outside world...and note that I said SOME Koreans.  I fully realize there are many well exposed, well informed folks as there are in every society.


I remain amazed at how clueless this society is of diversity.  Today (9 months into the job, mind you...)...one of my ss asked me if I was from Africa.  I explained that I'm American.  Then another said, oh but your skin.  Then I explained that black ppl are all over the world....Yes, in 2011 I had to explain that....*sigh

Just curious, have you ever referred to yourself as African-American and if so why?

Korean students are often more advanced than their foreign teachers give them credit. Hagwon students cover some pretty in-depth stuff. It's possible your student just read something that used the term "African-American" and didnt fully understand that term. It's actually a very nuanced idea that I wouldn't expect a student to fully understand.