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How many hours do you work at universities
« on: November 28, 2014, 09:24:02 am »
Quote
http://www.eslcafe.com/jobs/korea/index.cgi?read=62846

*Salary
-Master's or Ph.D. degree holders: 28,008,000 won per annum
-Required teaching 12 hours per week
-Overtime payment will be made if exceed required teaching hours

For jobs like these, how many hours besides the 12 hours of teaching hours do you have to put in, including prep time and office hours?

What about for public schools, and hagwons.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4692

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: How many hours do you work at universities
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2014, 10:12:39 am »
Do you have this, LeapOver?

Quote
*Qualifications
-Applicants MUST have a Master's Degree or higher.
-Applicants MUST have more than two years of teaching or research experience at University or College level

Good question though. I'm curious to know the answer too.


Re: How many hours do you work at universities
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2014, 10:33:36 am »
2.3 million a month for a PHD holder. It'd have to be part time to justify that kind of wage. You can make more than that as a binman in the UK. 


  • Ley_Druid
  • The Legend

    • 2468

    • February 17, 2011, 08:36:33 am
    • Shinan-Gun, Jeollanam-Do, South Korea
Re: How many hours do you work at universities
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2014, 10:39:23 am »
Depends on the institution, but usually around 30 hours. However, if it is a part time job, the 12 hours might be all you need. Although, most PhDs won't bother with that kind of job, because they often turn into unigwan jobs.


  • busandar
  • Super Waygook

    • 276

    • March 05, 2013, 11:41:05 am
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: How many hours do you work at universities
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2014, 12:55:10 pm »
It completely depends on the university, but from what I've seen the prep work can take up a decent chunk of time depending on how many new classes you have in any given semester.
 
Most uni positions have you work 4 days a week. My husband uses his day off to prep, pretty much all day + a few more hours throughout the week depending on the semester. He currently teaches around 20 hours in the classroom and receives O/T pay for everything past 12 hours which is a nice little bonus each month. Although, that goes away during the 4 months he has off (the lucky bugger).  ;D

At his school they work with the teachers' requests, so if some teachers want to bring in more money they'll request overtime and if other teachers don't want to work extra they accommodate that as best they can.

If you teach an English course you've already taught, obviously prep time goes down. So, the longer you're at your university the lower your prep time becomes. Some universities let their teachers create a class of their choosing (if they want to), which takes a lot more prep time as you create everything from scratch but they do a receive a small bonus for doing so.

In a busy semester where he's teaching 20 hours or approx. 10 classes - he probably preps for 12-14 hours/wk (loosely) at home and has to put in 2 hours of office time/wk.

The workload and all of that seems to drastically change from uni to uni, and like anything there seems to be pros and cons with each school.

On the other hand, one of our friends at a different uni teaches 12 hours with barely any prep time.


  • MJHanson
  • Expert Waygook

    • 502

    • May 02, 2011, 09:42:58 am
    • Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Re: How many hours do you work at universities
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2014, 01:28:06 pm »
Busandar's comment is spot on.  It will vary greatly depending on the job.  Some factors are:

-  Number of courses / lesson plans to prep each week (teaching one lesson to 4 different classes is not much work, but teaching 4 different lessons to 4 classes is a lot) 
-  Number of office hours
-  Amount of grading (writing teachers tend to have more grading) 
-  Any additional "cafe" or writing center hours
-  Amount of paperwork and other office work
-  Amount of extra work dumped on you by your boss

In my case, I'm a writing teacher and I teach 12 hours per week, but altogether it's about 25 working hours.  Broken down:

Four 3-hour classes (two different courses):  12 hours
Two lesson plans per week:  ~5 hours
Grading writing assignments: 2-3 hours
Helping students:  2-3 hours
Entering grades and other paperwork:  ~2 hours