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  • lieueez
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • August 30, 2015, 10:04:39 am
    • S. Korea
A couple of quick questions from myself and some people in my level 3 class.

First, how many hours can you miss without having it held against you? Some people are wondering if they can duck out for a quick vacation. (We have a weekend class.)

And second, where do the test materials come from, and can we get a leg up on the contents? Not the answers -- we just wanna know if there are things we should focus on in particular and things we can put aside.

I'm in Level 3 as well. You need 70 hours of class minimum to take the test. The reading test is 35-40 questions and you have 30 minutes to finish. The speaking test lasts for 5 minutes. Reading is 70% of your total score and speaking is 30%. I checked everything above directly with KIIP so it *shoud* be correct.   I think you need a 60% to pass the level, but I've heard my teacher and other people say 70%. I'm going to call KIIP and check. I believe a pass for level 2 is 70% and level 3 is 60%.

I think if you study the book you'll be fine. There will probably be some grammar questions too, but if you study the practice questions from 10과 20과 you can figure out what exceptions/irregulars will come out. But I've also heard the level 3 test has changed and is much more difficult with material on it that isn't in the book. So... who knows?!?!? Guess we'll just have to take it and find out.


Yikes. Well, at least we're in the ballpark of what to do and expect. Thanks!


  • JenH
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • October 25, 2013, 06:41:15 am
I took the Level 3 test this May~ will try to summarise the key points, but some things may vary from venue to venue.

- As previously said, you need to have attended a minimum of 70 class hours to be eligible for the test.

- The pass mark is 60% (iirc 말하기/speaking is worth 30% and 필기/written is worth 70%).

- 말하기/Speaking test was first. We went in groups of 4 and this portion lasted about 20 minutes, although you're individually speaking for only about 5 minutes.

- 필기/Written test started after every group had completed the speaking test. We had 30 minutes for 30 multiple-choice questions, iirc. However, our examiner noted that our paper seemed particularly difficult (basically, none of us would have finished within 30 minutes :huh:), so we were given 15 minutes of extra time.

The questions for both the speaking and written tests were not lifted directly from the textbook, and did not come solely from the Level 3 textbook. Some of the test topics seem to have come from the Level 2 book, as well. I took the level test and entered straight into Level 3, so I had never seen some of the material or vocabulary that appeared in the test paper ㅠㅠ

That being said, as long as you have a good general knowledge of grammar, you should be fine!


  • shostager
  • Super Waygook

    • 256

    • November 06, 2012, 06:08:10 am
Just took the level 5 test, so here's my two cents:

We did the writing test first - I would recommend practicing this, since I haven't had to write one character to a box, or try to figure out how to get as close as I could to 200 characters without going over. It's a format that they don't teach, so teach yourself! (5 minutes - 200 characters - simple question)

Multiple Choice! The first 10 or so questions were all grammar points, mostly difficult, which may or may not have been covered in level 4 (I don't remember very well, but there was no attention paid at all to grammar in the level 5 class). The rest mostly showed you some bullet points or a paragraph, and asked you either A) what is this about? or B) which words go in the blanks? Not strongly related to the practice tests you can find on Youtube.

Speaking Test: They took us 2-by-2. We had to read (in our head) a paragraph, summarize it, talk about how it relates to our experience (holidays), talk about a famous Korean person, then tell the reasons for the low birthrate in Korea and offer some solutions.

(mini-rant: I had to wait about an hour and 20 minutes to take the speaking test, after the multiple choice. They didn't tell us the order, and continued to call me by my middle name during the test, even after corrected. >end rant)


I just took the test for online class level 3.

20 questions of multi choice
Group speaking of 2 ~3 ppl per group

The speaking consisted of 3 parts, the first two were related (1st was related well and 2nd ...eh..okay but the practice test the day before was harder.) And then the third part was a back and forth between us which was completely unrelated and way too open to properly judge. I have zero idea what kind of answers they were looking for with the speaking and after each answer one of the two teachers always said "잘했어요".

I took this class knowing it would kick my rear end (had waaay to much other work to do + my full time job + this class) but it was free and learning is learning. Worst case I take the class again and use the same book with same vocab and grammar and then by then I'll really know it.

I honestly have no idea if I passed or not but will find out on Monday.


  • Lawrence
  • Super Waygook

    • 305

    • March 06, 2013, 10:59:23 am
    • South Korea
I have a few questions regarding the TOPIK test. I hope someone here has some reliable information. I tried calling the Immigration 1345" line and that wasn't very helpful and then I was able to speak with someone from the TOPIK testing center and she was a bit better but still not helpful enough. I hope I'm not posting in the wrong place, so let me just ask a question.
1. The 사회통합 프로그람 is the set of classes that are structured in 5 units that prepare you to take the TOPIK exam, is that correct? If so then,

2. I'm on an F-6 visa which is the 결혼이민. So I want to know can I take the TOPIK just using the online study guides without attending the 사회통합 프로그람? I tried taking them a couple of times and I didn't find the classes to be as helpful as I expected. I'm fairly certain that you can but I just want to be sure.

3. I heard that taking the TOPIK test can help you to get points towards a higher visa like the F-2. *This is the main questions* There are several different levels of the TOPIK exam so if I take the Level 1 sublevel 1, which is the lowest level, will I get some points if I pass it or do I need to pass some middle level before I can get some points, or do I need to pass the whole test?

4. Is there a website that shows how many points for each level? Information changes quickly. This year I've noticed many new sites about the TOPIK exam and it is hard to find some older ones, also it doesn't seem like the info is very in depth, just general stuff.

I get the feeling that getting points for immigration through this test is not a main reason why it is taken but as you decide to try to move up the immigration ladder you need to take language tests and even if you didn't it is still a good idea to be able to speak well. I hope this post is in the right place.


  • Lawrence
  • Super Waygook

    • 305

    • March 06, 2013, 10:59:23 am
    • South Korea
Does anyone know how accurate this info still is? http://www.electrow.com/visa-2/


  • Lawrence
  • Super Waygook

    • 305

    • March 06, 2013, 10:59:23 am
    • South Korea
What about the info here? https://bmvanhise.wordpress.com/2015/07/16/f2-visa-upgrading-your-life-in-korea-pt-ii/ It is from last year, it is in the MS Word document at the top of the site.


So KIIP (사회통합...) and TOPIK are completely different things. KIIP are language classes that also teach some culture, but the focus is clearly language. It is open at all (?) expats living in Korea. The program is not open to people living outside of Korea as this program is to help people to improve their life in Korea by improving their language ability.

TOPIK is a language test to see what your Korean abilities are. They offer the test inside Korea (more often) and outside Korea (less often). Anyone that registers and pays the money can test the exam.

You can take KIIP to prepare for the TOPIK, but is not necessary.

The TOPIK exam was Beginner 1, 2   Intermediate 1, 2   Advanced 1, 2   = 3 exams
And now they changed it to Beg 1, 2   and Int/advanced 3, 4, 5, 6   =  2 exams

The wordpress website has the MS Word file in English and Korean. Immigration last changed the point values summer 2015, so the links they give are current. I called Immigration recently to ask when the values will change (they have changed several times) and they told me they don't have advanced information; when the government makes a public announcement they hear it at the same time.

As you already have a F-6 visa, trying to get the F-2-7 (the points based visa you are talking about) really seems unnecessary as you already have the F-6. Getting the F-2-7 helps people that did not marry a local. The idea is Korea wants qualified/unique/highly skilled, etc. foreigners to live in Korea and giving them residency (the F-2-7) helps add incentive for them to come and stay in Korea. The more "qualified" you are, the more points you can get toward the 80 needed to get the F-2-7 (a total of 120 points are possible). Take the numbers you "earned" for each category, add them together, and if you get 80 or higher you can "earn" a F-2-7 residency visa.

So look at the English Word file you mentioned. Different ages have different points, different salaries have different points, different Korean abilities have different points, and under "extra points" include completing the KIIP program worth a bonus 10 points. If someone is taking KIIP classes to help them get the F-2-7, it will really help them if they finish the top KIIP level (level 5). Or again, learning the language through KIIP could help them raise their ability to a higher level, so if they take the TOPIK they can score higher and get more points.

I really didn't read much of the links you gave. But the Wordpress page says:
"Now, most participants will need to take part in KIIP (Korean Immigration Integration Program, ..."
That is because it is hard to get the 80 points needed and KIIP (especially completing it) can help to get more points.


  • Lawrence
  • Super Waygook

    • 305

    • March 06, 2013, 10:59:23 am
    • South Korea
So KIIP (사회통합...) and TOPIK are completely different things. KIIP are language classes that also teach some culture, but the focus is clearly language. It is open at all (?) expats living in Korea. The program is not open to people living outside of Korea as this program is to help people to improve their life in Korea by improving their language ability.

TOPIK is a language test to see what your Korean abilities are. They offer the test inside Korea (more often) and outside Korea (less often). Anyone that registers and pays the money can test the exam.

You can take KIIP to prepare for the TOPIK, but is not necessary.

The TOPIK exam was Beginner 1, 2   Intermediate 1, 2   Advanced 1, 2   = 3 exams
And now they changed it to Beg 1, 2   and Int/advanced 3, 4, 5, 6   =  2 exams

The wordpress website has the MS Word file in English and Korean. Immigration last changed the point values summer 2015, so the links they give are current. I called Immigration recently to ask when the values will change (they have changed several times) and they told me they don't have advanced information; when the government makes a public announcement they hear it at the same time.

As you already have a F-6 visa, trying to get the F-2-7 (the points based visa you are talking about) really seems unnecessary as you already have the F-6. Getting the F-2-7 helps people that did not marry a local. The idea is Korea wants qualified/unique/highly skilled, etc. foreigners to live in Korea and giving them residency (the F-2-7) helps add incentive for them to come and stay in Korea. The more "qualified" you are, the more points you can get toward the 80 needed to get the F-2-7 (a total of 120 points are possible). Take the numbers you "earned" for each category, add them together, and if you get 80 or higher you can "earn" a F-2-7 residency visa.

So look at the English Word file you mentioned. Different ages have different points, different salaries have different points, different Korean abilities have different points, and under "extra points" include completing the KIIP program worth a bonus 10 points. If someone is taking KIIP classes to help them get the F-2-7, it will really help them if they finish the top KIIP level (level 5). Or again, learning the language through KIIP could help them raise their ability to a higher level, so if they take the TOPIK they can score higher and get more points.

I really didn't read much of the links you gave. But the Wordpress page says:
"Now, most participants will need to take part in KIIP (Korean Immigration Integration Program, ..."
That is because it is hard to get the 80 points needed and KIIP (especially completing it) can help to get more points.

So then what is above the F-2-7 visa, citizenship? The beginning part of your post had info that I am already familiar with but some of your post was informative. I know it is hard over the internet to speak to another person, so thanks for your long and informative reply. Do you know what comes after the F-6? I'm thinking it is citizenship if the F-2 is for those not married to a Korean.


You're very welcome.

The ranking of F visas and changing from one to another I'm afraid is beyond my knowledge. Attention people that know more about this than me; fix my errors!

I know F-2's (at least F-2-7) have to be renewed every X number of years. The same is true for F-4 (ethnic Koreans born overseas), but F-5 is a "forever" so it does not need to be renewed. I am unsure about F-6.

Citizenship is possible but look into what would really change for you if you change your citizenship. I do say "change" as I believe Korea doesn't allow dual unless you are under a certain age. Also if you are male check to see if you need to serve in the military if you get Korean citizenship. I haven't heard anything solid about Korea, but I heard Taiwan requires all males who become citizens (up until the age of 55 or so) to serve in the army like everyone else.


Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #471 on: August 03, 2016, 03:20:34 pm »
Anybody have any clue when the next level 5 class (in-person not online) will be?  They told me back in April there would be one August or September.  I've been checking the socinet website everyday but nothing yet.


Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #472 on: August 08, 2016, 01:51:03 pm »
Did anyone else take the level test this past Saturday? I think I did fairly decent.  This thread really helped me with the speaking test also. So I just wanted to say thanks to everybody for posting here.  I read through the whole thread and the questions they asked were the same ones people posted on here last year.  So even though I hadn't prepared detailed answers, I had at least a few ideas in my head.

1. We read a very easy paragraph on seasons.
2. Asked us what our favorite season was and why.
3. Asked if there was a difference between houses in Korea and our home country
4. Asked the difference between 전세 and 월세 (I very stupidly got them backwards in my explanation).
5. Finally, asked why Koreans seem to be having less babies these days. 

Also, the written test felt very similar to the TOPIK practice tests that I have taken. So it might be a good idea to try a practice test beforehand just so you can have a feel for it.


Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #473 on: August 09, 2016, 02:45:46 pm »
@chocolate.croissant

I can't see Level 5 but KIIP just posted Level 4 class schedule for offline classes starting end of Aug/beg of Sept.


Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #474 on: August 09, 2016, 11:17:07 pm »
My friend is in level 3 and wants to drop to level 2; she says she's in over her head with level 3 and wants to do something she knows she can complete. How can she do that?

And yeah, my friend is my friend. I'm in a level 3 class now and seem to be doing passable mediocre. :laugh:


Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #475 on: August 12, 2016, 11:01:59 am »
Just a heads up to everybody. They've posted a lot of new classes. Mostly online classes so far. But I'm sure more will be up today and tomorrow.


Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #476 on: August 23, 2016, 11:57:32 pm »
Two quick questions since it's getting close to the end of the latest round of classes. People have been asking, and I just want to double-check since concrete facts are hard to come by. (In Korea, go figure, right?)

First, can someone drop a level, like from 3 to 2 or whatever? Someone I know doesn't like the pace of her course and wants to slow things down. I think she did too well on the level test but can't do well enough for the level she was put in.

And second, do they still give you an automatic pass if you fail a course, then take it again?

Actually, these questions are depressing. :O

Oh, and does anyone know the schedule for the remaining class starting dates this year? And maybe spring 2017?


Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #477 on: August 24, 2016, 07:56:28 am »
I found the jump from level 2 to 3 to be far too much even though I got placed into and eventually received a really high mark for level 2. What I'm doing is taking some time off from KIIP to self-study and work on my weak points (listening comprehension). I know from my experience that you have to be completely out of the program for 6 months before you can do the level test again. What I'm going to do is take the TOPIK, aiming for 4 but happy with 3, so I can show them my score and get placed straight into 4 or 5.

It's a good program but I found our class in the tiny, windowless classroom and the 9 hour days to be exhausting and tedious.

All the KIIP books are available online. I'm going through the level 3 book at my own speed and this time it's actually sticking.


Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #478 on: August 24, 2016, 08:16:25 am »
Two quick questions since it's getting close to the end of the latest round of classes. People have been asking, and I just want to double-check since concrete facts are hard to come by. (In Korea, go figure, right?)

First, can someone drop a level, like from 3 to 2 or whatever? Someone I know doesn't like the pace of her course and wants to slow things down. I think she did too well on the level test but can't do well enough for the level she was put in.

And second, do they still give you an automatic pass if you fail a course, then take it again?

Actually, these questions are depressing. :O

Oh, and does anyone know the schedule for the remaining class starting dates this year? And maybe spring 2017?

My teacher told me that you can change levels only once. So if your friend goes to level 2 and finds that things aren't quite the pace she wants, she would have to stick it out.

Second one, I'm not 100%, but I think it depends on the level? Lower levels you automatically pass on the second time. Level 5 is three times and you don't have to take the final. Once again, don't quote me on this.


  • HaLo3
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1058

    • January 02, 2014, 08:19:08 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: KIIP Korean Immigration Integration Programme (사회통합프로그램)
« Reply #479 on: August 24, 2016, 09:03:57 am »
Has anyone else had the problem of being unable to access the KIIP site because of security errors?