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  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5367

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
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Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« on: September 26, 2014, 04:13:30 am »
Why do you think the Asiad Games are so unpopular that the have to resort to this?  Location? Price?
 

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2014/09/116_165232.html

Civil servants at municipalities across the country, especially those near Incheon, are being pressured to buy tickets for events in the ongoing Asian Games.

Currently, only 30 percent of tickets have been reserved, and the low sales are a major headache for the organizers.

Last week, the Seoul Metropolitan Government (SMG) asked for "cooperation" from district offices in official documents to boost ticket sales during a meeting of officials from Seoul's 25 districts.

"The documents say that civil servants are Ďasked' to go and watch the games," an official at a northwestern Seoul district said on condition of anonymity. "But in reality, we regard it as an obligation."

SMG officials said that local governments are obliged to cooperate if the organizing committee asks them to do so.

"In the documents, we asked district officials to promote the games to residents," said an SMG official. "To become a role model for citizens, we also proposed that civil servants buy tickets and watch the games."

For Gyeonggi Province, a local daily reported that the provincial government allocated ticket sales to each of its 31 cities and counties _ Suwon was "recommended" to buy 22 tickets for the opening ceremony and 808 for other games, worth 17.6 million won in total; while Yeoncheon County, five tickets for the ceremony and 179 for games, worth 3.9 million won.

An official at the provincial government said, "We are not forcing them to buy the tickets."

These moves by Seoul and Gyeonggi followed a request from Incheon City Government and the organizing committee earlier this month.

They sent official documents titled "Introduction of the 17th Incheon Asian Games and Request for Ticket Sales Promotion" to local governments of 240 cities, counties and districts.

"Please promote ticket sales especially at support centers for multiracial families, so that foreign spouses can watch events in which athletes from their homelands compete," it said.

Security and Public Administration Minister Chong Jong-sup held a meeting of vice mayors and governors all over the country on Sept. 1 and encouraged the municipalities to buy tickets and offer them as gifts to acquaintances.

But such reluctant ticket purchases can sometimes lead to other problems.

All workers at Namdong District Office in Incheon bought tickets worth 32 million won in August. The district office said they did so "voluntarily."

About 100 workers there visited a stadium at 8 p.m. on Sept. 17 to watch a women's soccer match between Korea and India. Some of them brought chicken, soju and beer, although alcohol was not permitted in the stadium. The district office is currently investigating those workers.

rahnita@koreatimes.co.kr,


There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1745

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2014, 08:10:21 am »
It takes years, if not generations, to build a sporting culture. How long have the top leagues in Europe and the USA been around? 50-120 years. The KBO been around for about 30 years.

Let me give you an example. In the 1980's the Vancouver Canucks had trouble filling their building. A Canadian city having trouble supporting a hockey team, "That's impossible!" you say... It was probably a combination of demographics, and a lousy team. Another factor was that a huge chunk of the city were Asian immigrants just starting their families. And hockey was not a sport they've probably ever heard of.

Flash forward 30 years later, Canuck games are pretty much packed. Take a scan of the crowd, you'll see tons of guys in turbans, South Asians, and East Asians. Back in the 80's they were toddlers. 30 years later they've grown up watching hockey, and have jobs and willing to spend money on, what I consider, a lousy team.

In Korea's case, it's a probably a factor if minimal sporting culture, and the fact the current crop of parents don't really go to watch sports. I guess it's slowly changing, considering some of the basketball, and volleyball teams, sometimes fill their buildings of 10,000. Also, the sports leagues here need a lesson in marketing, or something. The 2002 World Cup was the K-League's opportunity, to get more fans. But for some reason they've squandered it.


Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2014, 08:15:18 am »
Most of the events at the Olympics are barely interesting. Maybe this failure will teach local governments a lesson about the real costs of hosting international parties.
They ban alcohol at the stadium and still expect people to watch low profile matches? Seems like a poor strategy.


Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2014, 08:16:35 am »
They ban alcohol and expect Koreans to come? Eating fried chicken and drinking beer/soju is mandatory for watching sports here.
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  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1745

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2014, 08:27:58 am »
Most of the events at the Olympics are barely interesting. Maybe this failure will teach local governments a lesson about the real costs of hosting international parties.
They ban alcohol at the stadium and still expect people to watch low profile matches? Seems like a poor strategy.
What? They've banned alcohol? Why? Is this normal with the Asian games?


Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2014, 09:14:15 am »
All world/world-stage sporting events that I have gone to have had strict policies on not bringing in outside food and drink.  The major sponsors of events pay obscene amounts of money in return for getting exclusive selling rights at venues.  Not sure who the sponsors are but also the International committee gets huge revenues from food and beverage sales and they do not want outside food and drink.  I'm going on Sunday so I will see for myself I guess. 

If they are having so much trouble filling the stadiums then they could release a few more tickets to non-Koreans.  I have looked at tickets for a while now and there are so few available through the non Korean ticket portal and the in person sales location in Korea is only available to Koreans.  I am not sure about other Asian country nationals as they have different ticketing portals.  I sent messages to see if you could get tickets at the locations but never got a response.  I hope to be able to see some para games as well but there is usually an easier time of getting those tickets. 


  • Andyroo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 676

    • February 09, 2011, 12:49:41 pm
    • Korea
Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2014, 09:31:13 am »
All world/world-stage sporting events that I have gone to have had strict policies on not bringing in outside food and drink.  The major sponsors of events pay obscene amounts of money in return for getting exclusive selling rights at venues.  Not sure who the sponsors are but also the International committee gets huge revenues from food and beverage sales and they do not want outside food and drink.  I'm going on Sunday so I will see for myself I guess. 


It's not clear whether OUTSIDE food and drink is banned or ALL alcohol. It is the Asian games so I could imagine a non alcohol clause being involved.



  • Andyroo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 676

    • February 09, 2011, 12:49:41 pm
    • Korea
Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2014, 09:35:01 am »
It takes years, if not generations, to build a sporting culture. How long have the top leagues in Europe and the USA been around? 50-120 years. The KBO been around for about 30 years.

Koreans will go to sporting events they care about. The Baseball league is well attended and the football games involving Korea at this event will be sold out.

The Asian games are not the Olympics. It's a much tougher sell and it's hard to get excited about it.



 


Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2014, 11:53:02 am »
They ban alcohol and expect Koreans to come? Eating fried chicken and drinking beer/soju is mandatory for watching sports here.

Nothing better than beer, sports, and fried chicken.


Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2014, 08:23:02 pm »
They ban alcohol and expect Koreans to come? Eating fried chicken and drinking beer/soju is mandatory for watching sports here.

Nothing better than beer, sports, and fried chicken.
 
Uh, I can easily think of much better.


Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2014, 09:20:46 pm »
Asian games = boring.



  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5367

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
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Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2014, 04:00:11 am »
From the little I have read too, the whole organisation seems to have been a last minute pali-pali affair and I am pretty sure the location is a factor too. If it were in Seoul then perhaps we would see greater attendance. It is supposed to be an Incheon affair too but i believe that some venues are outside Incheon, eg. Suwon. Perhaps this is par for the course, not sure, don't know too much about these games.

I think this may have something to do with it too.

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/sports/2014/09/207_165295.html


Incheon Asiad faces lots of catcalls, boos

By Kwon Ji-youn, Woo Hae-chung

INCHEON ― The organizing committee of the Incheon Asian Games seems overwhelmed by reports and complaints about poor preparations and amateurish management.

Korean and foreign media, along with various delegation officials, heaped criticisms on the quadrennial Games. The organizers talked to the press Friday but still failed to convince them that the remainder of the games will be conducted with fewer hitches.

"I do acknowledge the need for improvement and that we apologize," said Kwon Kyung-sang, secretary general of the Incheon Asian Games Organizing Committee.

"But the media's criticism that the international sporting event had degenerated into a school sports day is very insulting," Kwon added.

Still, a long list of reporters' complaints remain unheeded, making his remarks sound more like an emotional outburst than rational explanation.

At the top of the list is the easy task of lifting a ban on newspapers in the Main Press Center.

The organizers insist that publications other than the official paper, "The Asiad Daily," are not allowed.

The problem is the eight-page tabloid is 90 percent about South Korean news and just 10 percent about other country's news.

The New China News Agency raised issues over its composition.

More importantly, managing of the games smacked of amateurism.

The Qatar women's basketball team's forfeit of a match Wednesday caused a commotion when the Qatari athletes pulled out of the competition after being asked to remove their hijabs in accordance with Article 4.2.2 of the International Basketball Federation rules.

The rules state that players cannot wear headgear, hair accessories and jewelry.

Criticism has mounted over the fact that this rule could be understood as discriminatory against Muslim women, especially at a sporting event that is being held under the theme "Diversity Shines Here."

But the fact that the Qatar delegation had not been informed of this regulation ahead of the Asiad has added fuel to fire. One media outlet reported that the IAGOC had told them that hijabs would be permitted in Incheon.

"The decision to disallow hijabs was made by a technical director of FIBA Asia, the Asian governing body for basketball," said an IAGOC official. "The rules at the Asian Games have always been governed by the respective federations, so we assumed that they would know."

Then, the Japanese football team's training venue did not have a locker room, so athletes were unable to shower after training.

This led a Japanese official to call Korea a "developing" country, a reference obviously loaded with national antagonism.

"I did hear that the training venue lacks a locker room," said Yasuhiro Nakamori, a spokesman for the Japanese delegation to the Incheon Asian Games. "We are used to it, though, because most training venues at developing countries are like this."

It was reported by Sankei, a Japanese conservative newspaper, which also reported earlier that the team had to walk up 17 floors because an elevator was not working.

South Korean badminton star Lee Yong-dae said that the air-conditioning was extreme at the Gyeyang Gymnasium, which Chinese players said caused the shuttlecock to blow off course in more than one instance.

Tubagus Ade Lukman, chief of the Indonesian delegation, where the next Asian Games are set to take place, also said that the Incheon Games did not meet expectations.

"As someone who attended both the Doha and Guangzhou Games, I would say that both were better than this year's Asiad," he told local media. "Transportation was especially second-rate."
There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4122

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2014, 10:35:50 am »
"I did hear that the training venue lacks a locker room," said Yasuhiro Nakamori, a spokesman for the Japanese delegation to the Incheon Asian Games. "We are used to it, though, because most training venues at developing countries are like this."


Daaaaaaaaaamn! Very tactful insult from Mr. Nakamori.

Can't say I'm surprised by the amateurish organization, planning and implementation of the games. It was never meant to be spectacular anyway, just a quick cash grab for the planners before running off into paradise....plus, barely anyone in Korea even knows or cares there is an international competition happening in the country.


  • orangeman
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1769

    • September 01, 2011, 09:56:35 am
    • Seoul-East Side
Re: Civil servants 'pushed to buy Asiad tickets'
« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2014, 01:21:45 pm »
Most of the events at the Olympics are barely interesting. Maybe this failure will teach local governments a lesson about the real costs of hosting international parties.
They ban alcohol at the stadium and still expect people to watch low profile matches? Seems like a poor strategy.

I've gone to a couple of events already.  Alcohol was sold at all of them at reasonable prices.  Even though outside booze is prohibited, this is Korea so exceptions are made. 

For something that is "barely interesting", the Olympics do pretty well gaining 2-4 billion viewers every 2 years.  Anyway, this is the Asian Games which is different.  Unfortunately, Asian countries aren't very strong at many of these events (outside racket sports).  You're not going to see a Michael Phelps or Usain Bolt or Dream Team or world records. 

In my opinion, Korea/Incheon did a terrible job promoting this event.  Everything I saw was about how awesome Incheon is to host such an international event, and very little about what was actually going on and how to get tickets.  For me, I had to research on my own, and then have 4 different browsers open just to get an idea of what to do in order to see an event.  I needed the event schedule, then another window for a start list in that event to know who was actually participating, then the wiki page for the venue, then google maps to find it.  That's not even counting the two other windows open to buy tickets (and the fact that you have to make a login and password-with additional info- every time just just to see prices, seating and availability).  That's ridiculous, and I can guarantee you if it was simpler me and my friends would have seen more events.  But after getting a migraine over 2 hours just to find the basic info on the couple of things we were really interested in, I just gave up. 

Add to that the fact that the venues are so far apart and many aren't accessible to public transport, it just falls apart.  I get the fact they're not going to build an Olympic village for the Asian Games, but if I'm going out to Incheon for an afternoon game, I wouldn't mind seeing a boxing match afterwards.  But they're just so far apart and only doable by expensive taxi. 

Having said all that, we had fun and the tickets were affordable for a day out.  But Incheon isn't a world class city.  Yes, it's huge and has many people, but it's a suburb of Seoul.  There's nothing around many of the venues, so for people to travel all that way from other suburbs or Seoul itself is difficult. 

Anyway, my main point is they should have done a better job of advertising the event and getting people excited about it rather than patting themselves on the back for hosting it.  Not that I'm surprised at the way it's been managed.