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Re: Foreigners' job fair receives many complaints
« Reply #60 on: September 06, 2014, 11:07:55 pm »
I have a friend from Pakistan. She came here just knowing how to read Hangul. She just completed her 3rd semester at SNU in Korean and already passed TOPIK Level 6.


She mentioned there was a presentation from representatives of the big Korean companies about the job fair. She said that the companies want foreigners with a basic level of Korean. It shows dedication to the company and the country. Even though it doesn't make sense at a foreign job fair, she also said companies think foreigners who have been here for over a year and can't communicate at a basic level shows a sense of laziness.

She also asked the reps what can a foreigner do to land with a Korean company here with minimal Korean skills and they all pretty much said that we should take a year of Korean (quit current job) and try to get at least a TOPIK 4-5. That would be better than an extra year of work experience.

Take it for what it's worth. Not arguing just passing along the info.

Can you pass one more thing along? How did she get to TOPIK level 6 so quickly?


Re: Foreigners' job fair receives many complaints
« Reply #61 on: September 06, 2014, 11:52:44 pm »
Sounds very Korean.  Pretend to do something 'international', but make it really, really Korean and then shrug and say people don't understand your unique situation.  Like when they have 'international food fests' in Seoul and 9/10 stalls are serving bulgogi. 

It's not that the major information was in Korean, it's that no other language was present.  If you're seriously looking for international talent for international businesses, then you'd at least make the smallest effort to use international languages.  But, like I said, I doubt most of these firms are sincere about wanting international talent.  It's just a dog and pony show, like our open classes.  [/u] [/i] Korea seems so two faced on opening up to foreigners.  On one hand, they want the rest of the world to revere and desire Korean products, businesses and society.  But on the other hand, they take pride in making Korean things so opaque that foreigners have a tough time breaking through.  Like the Korean language.  We're often told we should learn it, but then told that it is too difficult for us.  It's like, "You should badly want to be us, but you should also understand that we are too unique for you to achieve that."  That's how I see things like this job fair; You should desperately want to work for us, but should realize that you're never going to be good enough to do so.

Dude, can I please take you out for some dakgalbi. That right there is the comment of the year. You just landed one of those Mike Tyson uppercuts!!!! :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:


Re: Foreigners' job fair receives many complaints
« Reply #62 on: September 07, 2014, 05:47:46 pm »
I have a friend from Pakistan. She came here just knowing how to read Hangul. She just completed her 3rd semester at SNU in Korean and already passed TOPIK Level 6.


She mentioned there was a presentation from representatives of the big Korean companies about the job fair. She said that the companies want foreigners with a basic level of Korean. It shows dedication to the company and the country. Even though it doesn't make sense at a foreign job fair, she also said companies think foreigners who have been here for over a year and can't communicate at a basic level shows a sense of laziness.

She also asked the reps what can a foreigner do to land with a Korean company here with minimal Korean skills and they all pretty much said that we should take a year of Korean (quit current job) and try to get at least a TOPIK 4-5. That would be better than an extra year of work experience.

Take it for what it's worth. Not arguing just passing along the info.

Can you pass one more thing along? How did she get to TOPIK level 6 so quickly?
So, basically,  why don't they just hire a Korean?


  • qi
  • Veteran

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    • July 21, 2011, 12:16:33 pm
Re: Foreigners' job fair receives many complaints
« Reply #63 on: September 08, 2014, 07:36:14 am »
Sounds very Korean.  Pretend to do something 'international', but make it really, really Korean and then shrug and say people don't understand your unique situation.  Like when they have 'international food fests' in Seoul and 9/10 stalls are serving bulgogi. 

It's not that the major information was in Korean, it's that no other language was present.  If you're seriously looking for international talent for international businesses, then you'd at least make the smallest effort to use international languages.  But, like I said, I doubt most of these firms are sincere about wanting international talent.  It's just a dog and pony show, like our open classes.  [/u] [/i] Korea seems so two faced on opening up to foreigners.  On one hand, they want the rest of the world to revere and desire Korean products, businesses and society.  But on the other hand, they take pride in making Korean things so opaque that foreigners have a tough time breaking through.  Like the Korean language.  We're often told we should learn it, but then told that it is too difficult for us.  It's like, "You should badly want to be us, but you should also understand that we are too unique for you to achieve that."  That's how I see things like this job fair; You should desperately want to work for us, but should realize that you're never going to be good enough to do so.

Dude, can I please take you out for some dakgalbi. That right there is the comment of the year. You just landed one of those Mike Tyson uppercuts!!!! :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Yeah, I think that's a good synopsis. There should be gambles in life. You have to step outside your comfort zone and learn something you think can get you a job. I have a lot of respect for people that learn Korean to a high level with a view to getting a job in Korea. But, I also don't disrespect those that don't go beyond elementary level Korean.

It's basically like this in my mind: You have tactical/analytical bets, like betting on a poker hand, or betting on a skill set that you think can give you a return.

Then you have the wild, speculative bets like say, betting that there will be stock gains of 10% year on year for Groupon.

Everything feels like the latter when I deal with Korean people and foreign investors certainly seem to feel the same way. The free economic zones set up in Incheon and other areas haven't really come to fruition. Korea, whether it be from the point of view of an individual or a business, is a wild speculative bet. I respect such a gambler but I'm not one. I play poker, but I'm not big on roulette if you catch my drift. I don't go to the casino and bet everything on red. Actually, the few times I went to the casino I did quite well. But, I have no intention to go back. My casino days are over.. no innuendo intended!
« Last Edit: September 08, 2014, 07:39:45 am by qi »