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  • gagevt
  • Moderator - LVL 3

    • 1173

    • August 24, 2013, 01:55:38 pm
    • Gyeongbuk
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Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #40 on: August 28, 2014, 02:00:15 pm »
It's not fair to argue we are less important than food? Jeez you didn't think that out from a family economics perspective.

Funny you pick the most (perhaps only) controversial expansion I mentioned to target. Yes that is a huge drain, but they all add up. When I said seems fair, I had my eyes on the other things. I also don't support free lunch for all as more important to education than English teacher.
So let me get this straight:
1) You say I didn't think things out because I suggested only giving free lunches to people who can't afford lunch and that we are more important than free lunches for everyone.

but at the same time...
2) You agree with me 100% that free lunches for all is less important than having us.

Also, I said uneccesary bits. I said "for example" to indicate that this was one example. I find the "extra security" to be dubious, considering that in many cases that ended up just being a guy that stands at the front entrance. And I don't think babysitting services are essential either. Or at least less essential than education...

With that 50,000 you can send them to after school classes and camps where they will get several hours more English education a week, some even with a NET perhaps. Or you can put the money towards a private academy...your choice. Paying for lunch or starving a kid....not much of a choice.
But there is no starving kid. That's what you're not getting. I suggested giving assistance to those that need assisting. If the kid is starving... they're going to get assistance.
NETs in public school aren't the only things people care about. Education budget is bloated so it's easy to pilfer from if you'd rather spend the money on other things. My point is, need it or not, saving 50,000 a month is pretty sweet. I don't think it's educational reasons they prefer free lunches for the middle class over better English education potential. I'm also rational enough to understand that not all education budget should strictly be for improving education. Whether parents use the savings directly for education or not, less bills to pay means less family stress.

And my school's gate greeter could beat your school's gate greeter in a staring contest. Besides he helps manage the delivery people, stops freeloaders from coming in to park, lurk, or sell things and knows how to use the surveillance cameras, lock the doors and when it's necessary to call the cops. He also helps with a little grounds keeping and children and parents feel safer and happy to see him. The rest of us were clueless and required meetings or worked piecemeal until he came along. I can't say he is there for educational purposes, but I think feeling safe and secure (whether true or imagined) would have a positive benefit for the learning environment. I can't say that my job is more important than his just like I can't say my job is more important than free lunches for the middle classes. That's up for voters. Call it education or not, it's under education budget.

My old school's security guy got in a fight with a middle school student from another school, half his size and lost... :( They were both taken away in a police car, that arrived while the old man was still on the ground. He still works there though.
"The man who passes the sentence should swing the sword."


Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #41 on: August 28, 2014, 02:10:15 pm »
I think it feels like now you're saying that it's neither fair nor unfair for that us to be culled, which is fair in that the voters get what they choose to vote for. But I still think that if they choose something stupid, that I should be able to take the stance as saying so.

And the security guard is important because he can control the cameras? Yeah... they can show anyone at the school how to do that. In fact, many schools just put the screens in the main office...
« Last Edit: August 28, 2014, 02:12:04 pm by slycordinator »


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6869

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #42 on: September 04, 2014, 10:36:47 am »
According to this...

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10205093460562631

...in 2013, 9,416 public schools (81.4%) had a NET.

Now in 2014, only 5,692 (48.6%) have a NET.

That's quite a drop in just one year.

The source listed is www.yunjaeok.com.

I think it's legit. (It is taking into account recently NETS have been increasing put at multiple schools, some doing five different schools per week. Even so, cuts have been so drastic, now more public schools don't have a NET (in any capacity) than do.


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #43 on: September 04, 2014, 11:38:47 am »
According to this...

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10205093460562631

...in 2013, 9,416 public schools (81.4%) had a NET.

Now in 2014, only 5,692 (48.6%) have a NET.

That's quite a drop in just one year.

The source listed is www.yunjaeok.com.

I think it's legit. (It is taking into account recently NETS have been increasing put at multiple schools, some doing five different schools per week. Even so, cuts have been so drastic, now more public schools don't have a NET (in any capacity) than do.

Those numbers are misleading.

If you omit the middle schools and most of the high schools from the equation, you get a more accurate picture.

97% of the schools that are programmed/budgeted to have a foreigner, have a foreigner.


  • Ley_Druid
  • The Legend

    • 2465

    • February 17, 2011, 08:36:33 am
    • Shinan-Gun, Jeollanam-Do, South Korea
Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #44 on: September 05, 2014, 08:51:32 am »
According to this...

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10205093460562631

...in 2013, 9,416 public schools (81.4%) had a NET.

Now in 2014, only 5,692 (48.6%) have a NET.

That's quite a drop in just one year.

The source listed is www.yunjaeok.com.

I think it's legit. (It is taking into account recently NETS have been increasing put at multiple schools, some doing five different schools per week. Even so, cuts have been so drastic, now more public schools don't have a NET (in any capacity) than do.

Those numbers are misleading.

If you omit the middle schools and most of the high schools from the equation, you get a more accurate picture.

97% of the schools that are programmed/budgeted to have a foreigner, have a foreigner.

Source? How many schools are budgeted for a NET? How many have them? What is the percentage of elementary schools that have NETs? What is the total percentage of schools, elementary, middle, and high, that have NETs?


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6869

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #45 on: September 05, 2014, 12:00:33 pm »
The original plan was for every public school in Korea to have their own NET.

Now less than half have one (shared or otherwise).

Less schools receive government money to get one than before.

Rural/poor areas (especially at the elementary level) seem to still get budgets for them. Other schools, not so much.

There has been a sizable reduction going on lately.


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #46 on: September 05, 2014, 01:44:03 pm »
According to this...

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10205093460562631

...in 2013, 9,416 public schools (81.4%) had a NET.

Now in 2014, only 5,692 (48.6%) have a NET.

That's quite a drop in just one year.

The source listed is www.yunjaeok.com.

I think it's legit. (It is taking into account recently NETS have been increasing put at multiple schools, some doing five different schools per week. Even so, cuts have been so drastic, now more public schools don't have a NET (in any capacity) than do.

Those numbers are misleading.

If you omit the middle schools and most of the high schools from the equation, you get a more accurate picture.

97% of the schools that are programmed/budgeted to have a foreigner, have a foreigner.

Source? How many schools are budgeted for a NET? How many have them? What is the percentage of elementary schools that have NETs? What is the total percentage of schools, elementary, middle, and high, that have NETs?

Sorry for the confusion, Seoul-only, not country-wide (http://sen.go.kr)

In Seoul, 587 elementary schools have at least one native teacher, some middle schools and a few high schools have a special budget for native teachers, making the current number, 686.




  • ravenlock
  • Adventurer

    • 63

    • November 21, 2013, 12:26:00 pm
    • busan
Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #47 on: September 05, 2014, 04:59:55 pm »
come to China..


I know I have only been here three weeks, but everything is much better. Food, students, coworkers, Chinese people are mad chill and really super relaxed. MONEY...mad vacation time..NO SUMMERS!!! and one month in the winter!

The internet sucks, and the efficiency of my coworkers is rather head scratching, but I am learning how to work the system. Ask early, and often, expect numerous delays and errors, and then be expected to praise them when the task is FINALLY completed-but this is Asia, so standard protocol. Not really surprised...and not a whole lot different from Korea.

I am teaching Bio/Chem and not English, so maybe I can't relate to ESL  teaching here, but I work in a school with an ESL teacher here, very satisfied. We choose how to teach, test, and make our own schedule.

Seriously, everything is much improved here. ESPECIALLY THE FOOD!!! And in my mind, not witnessing the obscene vanity of every person around me is a major life improvement. I actually was looking for mirrors myself...nope, not a thing here. so refreshing.

Try it, you might like it.


Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #48 on: September 05, 2014, 07:46:50 pm »
come to China..


I know I have only been here three weeks, but everything is much better. Food, students, coworkers, Chinese people are mad chill and really super relaxed. MONEY...mad vacation time..NO SUMMERS!!! and one month in the winter!

The internet sucks, and the efficiency of my coworkers is rather head scratching, but I am learning how to work the system. Ask early, and often, expect numerous delays and errors, and then be expected to praise them when the task is FINALLY completed-but this is Asia, so standard protocol. Not really surprised...and not a whole lot different from Korea.

I am teaching Bio/Chem and not English, so maybe I can't relate to ESL  teaching here, but I work in a school with an ESL teacher here, very satisfied. We choose how to teach, test, and make our own schedule.

Seriously, everything is much improved here. ESPECIALLY THE FOOD!!! And in my mind, not witnessing the obscene vanity of every person around me is a major life improvement. I actually was looking for mirrors myself...nope, not a thing here. so refreshing.

Try it, you might like it.
Which city would you recommend?
Are you able to breathe well?


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6869

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Korea cuts 2,500 native-English teachers at public schools
« Reply #49 on: September 05, 2014, 08:33:14 pm »
In Seoul, 587 elementary schools have at least one native teacher, some middle schools and a few high schools have a special budget for native teachers, making the current number, 686.

It's better than nothing, but that's a really small total considering Seoul is one of the biggest cities in the world. That's one NET for every 15,000 residents.

Granted, Seoul has a really low birthrate...

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20140904000794

...but that's a freaking tiny number. I'd say the number of middle and high schools in Seoul with a special budget for a native speaker are few and far between (so much so as to be statistically insignificant).