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  • iamrhart
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1937

    • November 16, 2011, 01:20:16 pm
    • XXXXXXXXxx
Korean Defends Ramein.
« on: August 22, 2014, 11:45:27 am »
I find this article to be:
1) interesting regarding the research.
2) funny regarding the depictions of south koreans.  for example (but not limited to): "Drunk and hungry just after dawn, he rips the lid off a bowl of his beloved fast food, wobbling on his feet but still defiant over a report" *quoted DIRECTLY from the article.
3) if you follow the link, you will see a picture of a man eating instant noodles.  the pictures in the background are NOT korean.  ^.^


"SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Kim Min-koo has an easy reply to new American research that hits South Korea where it hurts — in the noodles. Drunk and hungry just after dawn, he rips the lid off a bowl of his beloved fast food, wobbling on his feet but still defiant over a report that links instant noodles to health hazards.

"There's no way any study is going to stop me from eating this," says Kim, his red face beaded with sweat as he adds hot water to his noodles in a Seoul convenience store. His mouth waters, wooden chopsticks poised above the softening strands, his glasses fogged by steam. At last, he spears a slippery heap, lets forth a mighty, noodle-cooling blast of air and starts slurping.

"This is the best moment — the first bite," Kim, a freelance film editor who indulges about five times a week, says between gulps. "The taste, the smell, the chewiness — it's just perfect."




 
Instant noodles carry a broke college student aura in America, but they are an essential, even passionate, part of life for many in South Korea and across Asia. Hence the emotional heartburn caused by a Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital study in the United States that linked instant noodles consumption by South Koreans to some risks for heart disease.

The study has provoked feelings of wounded pride, mild guilt, stubborn resistance, even nationalism among South Koreans, who eat more instant noodles per capita than anyone in the world. Many of those interviewed vowed, like Kim, not to quit. Other noodle lovers offered up techniques they swore kept them healthy: taking Omega-3, adding vegetables, using less seasoning, avoiding the soup. Some dismissed the study because the hospital involved is based in cheeseburger-gobbling America.

The heated reaction is partly explained by the omnipresence here of instant noodles, which, for South Koreans, usually mean the spicy, salty "ramyeon" that costs less than a dollar a package. Individually-wrapped disposable bowls and cups are everywhere: Internet cafes, libraries, trains, ice-skating rinks. Even at the halfway point of a trail snaking up South Korea's highest mountain, hikers can refresh themselves with cup noodles.

Elderly South Koreans often feel deep nostalgia for instant noodles, which entered the local market in the 1960s as the country began clawing its way out of the poverty and destruction of the Korean War into what's now Asia's fourth-biggest economy. Many vividly remember their first taste of the once-exotic treat, and hard-drinking South Koreans consider instant noodles an ideal remedy for aching, alcohol-laden bellies and subsequent hangovers.

Some people won't leave the country without them, worried they'll have to eat inferior noodles abroad. What could be better at relieving homesickness than a salty shot of ramyeon?

"Ramyeon is like kimchi to Koreans," says Ko Dong-ryun, 36, an engineer from Seoul, referring to the spicy, fermented vegetable dish that graces most Korean meals. "The smell and taste create an instant sense of home."

Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. "Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough."

The U.S. study was based on South Korean surveys from 2007-2009 of more than 10,700 adults aged 19-64, about half of them women. It found that people who ate a diet rich in meat, soda and fried and fast foods, including instant noodles, were associated with an increase in abdominal obesity and LDL, or "bad," cholesterol. Eating instant noodles more than twice a week was associated with a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome, another heart risk factor, in women but not in men.

The study raises important questions, but can't prove that instant noodles are to blame rather than the overall diets of people who eat lots of them, cautions Alice Lichtenstein, director of the cardiovascular nutrition lab at Tufts University in Boston.

"What's jumping out is the sodium (intake) is higher in those who are consuming ramen noodles," she says. "What we don't know is whether it's coming from the ramen noodles or what they are consuming with the ramen noodles."

There's certainly a lot of sodium in those little cups. A serving of the top-selling instant ramyeon provides more than 90 percent of South Korea's recommended daily sodium intake.

Still, it's tough to expect much nutrition from a meal that costs around 80 cents, says Choi Yong-min, 44, marketing director for Paldo, a South Korean food company. "I can't say it's good for your health, but it is produced safely."

By value, instant noodles were the top-selling manufactured food in South Korea in 2012, the most recent year figures are available, with about 1.85 trillion won ($1.8 billion) worth sold, according to South Korea's Ministry of Food and Drug Safety.

China is the world's largest instant noodle market, according to the World Instant Noodles Association, although its per capita consumption pales next to South Korea's. The food is often a low-end option for Chinese people short of money, time or cooking facilities.

Japan, considered the spiritual home of instant noodles, boasts a dazzling array. Masaya "Instant" Oyama, 55, who says he eats more than 400 packages of instant noodles a year, rattles off a sampling: Hello Kitty instant noodles, polar bear instant noodles developed by a zoo, black squid ink instant noodles.

In Tokyo, 33-year-old Miyuki Ogata considers instant noodles a godsend because of her busy schedule and contempt for cooking. They also bring her back to the days when she was a poor student learning to become a filmmaker, and would buy two cup noodles at the 100 yen shop. Every time she eats a cup now, she is celebrating what she calls "that eternal hungry spirit."

In South Korea, it's all about speed, cost and flavor.

Thousands of convenience stores have corners devoted to noodles: Tear off the top, add hot water from a dispenser, wait a couple minutes and it's ready to eat, often at a nearby counter.

Some even skip the water, pounding on the package to break up the dry noodles, adding the seasoning, then shaking everything up.

"It's toasty, chewy, much better than most other snacks out there," Byon Sarah, 28, who owns a consulting company, says of a technique she discovered in middle school. "And the seasoning is so addictive — sweet, salty and spicy."

Cheap electric pots that boil water for instant noodles in one minute are popular with single people. Making an "instant" meal even faster, however, isn't always appreciated.

At the comic book store she runs in Seoul, Lim Eun-jung, 42, says she noticed a lot more belly fat about six months after she installed a fast-cooking instant noodle machine for customers.

"It's obvious that it's not good for my body," Lim says. "But I'm lazy, and ramyeon is the perfect fast food for lazy people."

___

AP journalists Youkyung Lee in Seoul, Yuri Kageyama in Tokyo, Didi Tang and Zhang Weiqun in Beijing, and AP Food Editor J.M. Hirsch in Concord, New Hampshire, contributed to this story.





http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/21/koreans-instant-noodles-health-ramen_n_5697632.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592
You only live today once. You wont get a second chance. You wont get to live it twice. So make the most of it.

A sane man in an insane world will appear insane.


Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2014, 11:58:46 am »
Thanks for posting the article, as my school blocks HuffPo.

I think that staying up until dawn drunk probably causes more health problems than the ramyeon breakfast/nightcap. Hard to believe someone would eat it five times a week though. I can stomach it about once a week at most. And I do follow some of the tricks in the article, such as using half of the spice, and adding an egg for a bit of nutritional protein. Although, come to think of it the slice of factory cheese probably negates anything else good in my ramyeon too. If only there were a way to satiate my need for greasy hamburgers (when drunk at dawn) I wouldn't have to resort to ramyeon.  :P
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Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2014, 12:15:16 pm »
If it costs 80 cents, it means they make it for 4. Why would you eat that any time other than a dire emergency.


  • JLCutler
  • Veteran

    • 164

    • August 31, 2011, 02:50:38 pm
    • Seoul, Korea
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2014, 12:17:59 pm »
Thanks for the link.  I found most of the information contained therein to be very much a load of Duh but it was super nice to see it in printed form.  The photo, however, is pretty insulting.  Someone didn't do a single bit of research, huh?  Just picked the first photo found when searching for available images....


Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2014, 12:36:42 pm »
I think the writer knows the guy in the picture isn't Korean. If you put your mouse on the picture it says he's a Japanese ramen expert.


  • marenm
  • Adventurer

    • 68

    • September 02, 2013, 07:46:45 pm
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2014, 01:17:11 pm »
 ;D   but sadly, in an attempt to lose the 5 pounds I've gained in Korea, ramyeon and I have parted ways.

Pro-tip: add real cheddar cheese and drain off some water for a K-style spicy mac and cheese.


  • fishead
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1138

    • April 23, 2010, 07:58:05 am
    • Yangju Korea
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2014, 01:17:44 pm »
 I heard Japanese Ramyeon is different from Korean Ramyeon.
So far the best noodles I have had in Korea was Kalgooksu from a really crowded but humble restaurant in Myeong dong


Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2014, 01:24:09 pm »
I think by default Koreans think ramen is the instant stuff -- cup noodles. The Japanese tend to think of the proper dish that's not wolfed down by drunks and then vomited outside the 7-Eleven, though both nations have both kinds of ramen. The article seems to muddle the difference a bit. Neither is health food by any stretch of the imagination, but at least the slow-cooked Japanese ramen isn't always made by cutting every corner and flavor-blasting the dish with MSG and chemicals.

And I say that as a big fan of instant ramen. (Though the Japanese also win in that category without breaking a sweat.)
« Last Edit: August 22, 2014, 01:25:55 pm by oatmealkooky »


Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2014, 02:15:54 pm »
I think the picture is of a Japanese man because the article is also discussing Japanese people and their ramen culture. I know because of the title it is misleading, but from the whole article I wouldn't have been surprised if it were a picture of a Chinese person since they are also mentioned.

I also love Ramen and have found myself on that super spicy ramen train that some peeps have done that food challenge with. I have always been a ramen person though. I even do the dry way sometimes, but only with certain flavors as others aren't as good.
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  • iamrhart
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1937

    • November 16, 2011, 01:20:16 pm
    • XXXXXXXXxx
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2014, 02:45:16 pm »
I think the picture is of a Japanese man because the article is also discussing Japanese people and their ramen culture. I know because of the title it is misleading, but from the whole article I wouldn't have been surprised if it were a picture of a Chinese person since they are also mentioned.

I also love Ramen and have found myself on that super spicy ramen train that some peeps have done that food challenge with. I have always been a ramen person though. I even do the dry way sometimes, but only with certain flavors as others aren't as good.

what is the challenge? 
which Ramein are we talking about? i know the Bool Dalk Bokeummyeon is/was pretty darn spicy.  but i never heard of any 'spicy ramein challenge.'  im game. gimme the dets.
You only live today once. You wont get a second chance. You wont get to live it twice. So make the most of it.

A sane man in an insane world will appear insane.


Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2014, 03:10:49 pm »
I know obesity has gotten worse over the years, but I thought of this site when I saw the article:

http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cause-of-death/coronary-heart-disease/by-country/

So people in Korea might truly be doing things to offset the heart disease giving ramen. They have one of the lowest death rates by heart disease in the world. I would have thought there would be more studies on causes of stomach cancer since Korea ranks pretty high in this category.


Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2014, 03:15:36 pm »
They may have a low rate of heart disease now, but what is the trend? Is the rate going up or down? And can we assume that other, more diversified causes of death are affecting Koreans instead -- alcohol abuse, liver disease, cancer?

I have no idea. Just wondering how to put those statistics into better context.


  • Redondo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 642

    • October 14, 2012, 05:28:11 am
    • toronto
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2014, 04:28:42 pm »
Ramen is like a bag of potato chips. It's the lowest of low in junk food. It has tons of sodium, calories from saturated fats and no nutritional value. If you think of it as a meal, not a snack and eat it to get full, you are going to get fat.


  • grey
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1536

    • April 08, 2011, 04:47:11 am
    • USA
    more
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2014, 04:54:52 pm »
Ramen is delicious.

I am sad.

Do not poop up my cot dang egg.



Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP


Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2014, 08:58:38 pm »
Ramen(heh..ramyeon here) is absolutely bad for you. In every way. There is zero nutritional value in it. None. It is like fast food..complete garbage for your body. And it have it every day(or multiple times a week)..gad..that has to do tons of damage. Korean ramen, I agree, is like the fast food version of ramen. Lacks any presentation or fluff..it is just stuff fit for drunks who, like another poster noted, just throw it up later on the street or in the subway. And, of course, you have to feel sorry for the poor pigeons that discover it. I can see having it every once in awhile, but it really is just nasty stuff. Might as well be eating solidified gasoline.


  • Davey
  • Moderator - LVL 3

    • 1833

    • February 01, 2010, 01:36:20 pm
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2014, 09:25:16 pm »
Everything in moderation. If you want to make it "healthier," add a ton of veggies and an egg.

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  • EL34
  • Expert Waygook

    • 728

    • September 28, 2013, 07:48:34 pm
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2014, 04:12:06 am »
;D   but sadly, in an attempt to lose the 5 pounds I've gained in Korea, ramyeon and I have parted ways.

Pro-tip: add real cheddar cheese and drain off some water for a K-style spicy mac and cheese.

Five pounds? I'll lose that in a day if I don't eat enough protein.


  • EL34
  • Expert Waygook

    • 728

    • September 28, 2013, 07:48:34 pm
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2014, 04:13:47 am »
Ramen(heh..ramyeon here) is absolutely bad for you. In every way. There is zero nutritional value in it. None. It is like fast food..complete garbage for your body. And it have it every day(or multiple times a week)..gad..that has to do tons of damage. Korean ramen, I agree, is like the fast food version of ramen. Lacks any presentation or fluff..it is just stuff fit for drunks who, like another poster noted, just throw it up later on the street or in the subway. And, of course, you have to feel sorry for the poor pigeons that discover it. I can see having it every once in awhile, but it really is just nasty stuff. Might as well be eating solidified gasoline.

Yup. Massive amounts of sodium and saturated fat. Total junk food.


  • BloosCorn
  • Veteran

    • 196

    • August 31, 2012, 08:04:13 am
    • Yecheon, South Korea
Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2014, 08:44:51 am »
I'm not sure why foods like this aren't viewed the same as cigarettes. Far be it from me to keep one from picking their poison, but your dumb ass should be taxed to cover the burden on public health infrastructure. Even ten percent on ramen would hardly be noticeable.


Re: Korean Defends Ramein.
« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2014, 09:00:53 am »
Korean instant "lamyeon" (how they say it, even though they insist it should be written with an R) is definitely pretty good compared with the crappy Japanese stuff you get in the US. Nissin? Cup Noodle? Blargh. Give me some Nong Shim instead.

Ramen is part of the confusion about what Westerners and Koreans consider to be meals and snacks. To a Westerner, a bowl of ramen is a meal. To Koreans it's a snack, but keep in mind that Koreans eat pretty large snacks like 10 times a day. I've often eaten Shin Ramen Black for lunch and all my co-workers started fussing over me because I wasn't eating enough. I'm sorry, I don't feel like eating a giant pile of rice surrounded by 50 bowls of banchan every day!