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  • SpaceRook
  • Expert Waygook

    • 814

    • November 18, 2010, 11:54:36 am
    • South Korea
1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« on: July 23, 2014, 05:19:25 am »
I thought this was an interesting article.  25% of young Koreans quit during their first year.  This can be quite a burden on businesses because most places don't profit from an employee until well after a year.

Quote
The main reasons are their failure to adjust to corporate culture and the demands of the new job.

The Korea Employers Federation on Sunday that a study of new hires in 405 small and large companies shows that 25.2 percent of university graduates quit during their first year on the job.

...

Kim Dong-wook at the Federation said, "For businesses that have to spend an average of 18 months training a new hire the rising dropout rate is quite a burden. This trend will prompt companies to look for recruits who are best capable of adjusting to new conditions."

Maybe this trend should prompt companies to suck less and stop driving people away? 

Personally, I'm impressed that so many young Koreans are choosing to leave the horrible Korean work culture. 


  • gtrain83
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1755

    • August 27, 2011, 10:26:20 am
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2014, 05:47:03 am »
Not saying you are wrong but maybe if they weren't babied for the first 18 + years of life they would be capable of holding a job. The way they are coddled, at least in elementary, I am surprised it is not 75% quitting. Whats that???? You havent had a notbook or book or pencil for 17  wks * 3 classes per week this yea? Heres a reward!!!! Pretty sure a business is the opposite .


  • SpaceRook
  • Expert Waygook

    • 814

    • November 18, 2010, 11:54:36 am
    • South Korea
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2014, 06:05:34 am »
Not saying you are wrong but maybe if they weren't babied for the first 18 + years of life they would be capable of holding a job. The way they are coddled, at least in elementary, I am surprised it is not 75% quitting. Whats that???? You havent had a notbook or book or pencil for 17  wks * 3 classes per week this yea? Heres a reward!!!! Pretty sure a business is the opposite .

I do agree with some of this and I am definitely one of those people who feels Koreans lack a certain perspective because most of them have never had a job as a teen/student.

BUT....

As someone who works in a Korean company, it is a horrendous culture.  As a foreigner, I just bail out on most of the stupid stuff.  But it is still an insanely inefficient, disrespectful, and infuriating environment.  Young Koreans experience tons of drinking, intrusions into their free time and weekends, very poor use of their skills, and they learn lots of very bad work habits.  Korean managers know exactly one management technique: wait until the last minute to tell you something to create "crisis" and make everyone work hard.  The hierarchy is obscene, and no matter what your skill or job, you are totally the b1tch of your senior colleagues (even if they are 1 day older than you).   

My advice to young Koreans is always the same: study English like your life depends on it and get out of this country. 


  • gtrain83
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1755

    • August 27, 2011, 10:26:20 am
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2014, 07:30:13 am »
Not saying you are wrong but maybe if they weren't babied for the first 18 + years of life they would be capable of holding a job. The way they are coddled, at least in elementary, I am surprised it is not 75% quitting. Whats that???? You havent had a notbook or book or pencil for 17  wks * 3 classes per week this yea? Heres a reward!!!! Pretty sure a business is the opposite .

I do agree with some of this and I am definitely one of those people who feels Koreans lack a certain perspective because most of them have never had a job as a teen/student.

BUT....

As someone who works in a Korean company, it is a horrendous culture.  As a foreigner, I just bail out on most of the stupid stuff.  But it is still an insanely inefficient, disrespectful, and infuriating environment.  Young Koreans experience tons of drinking, intrusions into their free time and weekends, very poor use of their skills, and they learn lots of very bad work habits.  Korean managers know exactly one management technique: wait until the last minute to tell you something to create "crisis" and make everyone work hard.  The hierarchy is obscene, and no matter what your skill or job, you are totally the b1tch of your senior colleagues (even if they are 1 day older than you).   

My advice to young Koreans is always the same: study English like your life depends on it and get out of this country.

Sounds horrible.


  • Korea13
  • Super Waygook

    • 494

    • May 29, 2013, 08:36:18 am
    • korea
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2014, 07:51:46 am »
Not saying you are wrong but maybe if they weren't babied for the first 18 + years of life they would be capable of holding a job. The way they are coddled, at least in elementary, I am surprised it is not 75% quitting. Whats that???? You havent had a notbook or book or pencil for 17  wks * 3 classes per week this yea? Heres a reward!!!! Pretty sure a business is the opposite .


Remind me of the one time I went to the language exchange meeting in Gangnam. Talk to a 37 years old Korean women. Remember we were discussing about being independent vs.  dependent. Told her that back in the west (USA) I started working at the age of 16 in high school and continue until university and after university.

This blow her mind. She couldn't understand why I would work at SUCH A YOUNG AGE.

I told her I needed money to buy and paid for my own thing instead of depending on my parents. This discussion quickly turn into an argument.

I ask her how did she get money to buy thing while she was younger. She reply without hesitation "FROM MY PARENTS OF COURSE" From her perspective parents are suppose to pay for their children until the children have graduate from school (In her opinion, university).

Remember this is a 37 year old Korean women.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2014, 08:09:07 am »
Maybe the first jobs they get aren't great because they have no experience coming out of college.


  • minamteacher
  • Expert Waygook

    • 728

    • October 05, 2010, 07:55:14 am
    • Incheon
    more
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2014, 09:07:30 am »
Interesting the divide between people who blame the individual and people who blame the company. I think a combination of unrealistic expectations hitting the cold hard reality of Korea's terrible working conditions are both in play here. Still, 25% is lower than I expected. I wonder what the rate is back in our home countries.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2014, 09:32:48 am »
Interesting the divide between people who blame the individual and people who blame the company. I think a combination of unrealistic expectations hitting the cold hard reality of Korea's terrible working conditions are both in play here. Still, 25% is lower than I expected. I wonder what the rate is back in our home countries.
The only number I could find was 35% in the first six month for the U.S., but that was also in 2005.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2014, 09:36:24 am »
Though it's true that Korean corporate culture is insane, it's right to be wary of blaming only that.  The days of graduate jobs being jobs for life are long gone.  Similar things are happening back in the UK.  Straight-out-of-university graduate jobs are seen as stepping-stones to get experience and some skills.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2014, 09:48:55 am »
Having work experience would probably change things but I wonder if it would make Koreans more tolerant of their awful corporate culture or have the opposite effect and make people even more miserable.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2014, 09:58:51 am »
there was a good article on Koreabang recently about how many Koreans quit their jobs early because salaries aren't advertised along with job postings, and it's frowned upon to ask what the salary is. so a lot of people start jobs not knowing what the salary is until their very first payday, then find out that it's some ridiculously small amount, and so they quit. that could be another contributing factor. here's the article: http://www.koreabang.com/2014/stories/classified-salary-infuriates-job-applicants.html

also, i'd like to add that not having a job until after college seems to be the domain of the rich and/or people in the cities. at my rural high school last year we actually didn't have a summer camp because the majority of the students had to get summer jobs to help bring in money for the family.

and all those people you see working at Cafe Bene, GS25, etc., are mainly university students trying to make some cash. it seems that quite a few university students have part-time jobs.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2014, 10:14:12 am »
Not saying you are wrong but maybe if they weren't babied for the first 18 + years of life they would be capable of holding a job. The way they are coddled, at least in elementary, I am surprised it is not 75% quitting. Whats that???? You havent had a notbook or book or pencil for 17  wks * 3 classes per week this yea? Heres a reward!!!! Pretty sure a business is the opposite .


Absolutely. The kids are so coddled here. I  can see many of them not having a lick of work ethic in the future. I mean, hell, just go back to living with mommy and daddy. Even in your 30's. It is considered acceptable here. Crazy. They ought to be ashamed, but rather hide behind the "it's Korean culture" garbage. No, you SHOULD  be ashamed to living with mommy and daddy and having them pay for your food, clothes, pc rooms.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2014, 10:17:39 am »
Not saying you are wrong but maybe if they weren't babied for the first 18 + years of life they would be capable of holding a job. The way they are coddled, at least in elementary, I am surprised it is not 75% quitting. Whats that???? You havent had a notbook or book or pencil for 17  wks * 3 classes per week this yea? Heres a reward!!!! Pretty sure a business is the opposite .

I do agree with some of this and I am definitely one of those people who feels Koreans lack a certain perspective because most of them have never had a job as a teen/student.

BUT....

As someone who works in a Korean company, it is a horrendous culture.  As a foreigner, I just bail out on most of the stupid stuff.  But it is still an insanely inefficient, disrespectful, and infuriating environment.  Young Koreans experience tons of drinking, intrusions into their free time and weekends, very poor use of their skills, and they learn lots of very bad work habits.  Korean managers know exactly one management technique: wait until the last minute to tell you something to create "crisis" and make everyone work hard.  The hierarchy is obscene, and no matter what your skill or job, you are totally the b1tch of your senior colleagues (even if they are 1 day older than you).   

My advice to young Koreans is always the same: study English like your life depends on it and get out of this country.
 

Completely disagree with the last part. They need to change the system rather than running away to other countries. Why should other countries take them in? Change your own wacked out culture here and stop "running away." Koreans excel at this sort of behavior, which is why things remain as screwed up as they are here.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2014, 10:19:48 am »
I have a Korean friend that just started working at a company recently...

Things I heard from them while drinking:

In some companies, for the first six months, you aren't even called a regular worker but an "intern", which means you only get paid 80% of the normal salary (in this case, this is about 1.6) and you will have no holidays for a year.

On paper, the working hours are until 6 PM. In practice, it's from at least 8 PM - 10 PM if not later, and you WILL be asked to come in on the weekend, in some cases for a few months, because "business is not going well".

No, you will not get paid overtime.

Being the very newest employee, your coworkers will give you whatever they don't feel like doing at the moment and you should smile and nod like they are doing you a big favor even if it's ten minutes before leaving-time.

Apparently smoking breaks are 99% mandatory. Not sure about drinking at hwaesiks, but that also seems to be mandatory.

There is no work-training for new hires, your job is to figure things out yourself, and you WILL get cursed at if you don't pick things up fast enough.

Sounds lovely...  :huh:
« Last Edit: July 23, 2014, 10:22:34 am by caerdroia »
"Don't Panic"


  • gtrain83
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1755

    • August 27, 2011, 10:26:20 am
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2014, 10:25:54 am »
there was a good article on Koreabang recently about how many Koreans quit their jobs early because salaries aren't advertised along with job postings, and it's frowned upon to ask what the salary is. so a lot of people start jobs not knowing what the salary is until their very first payday, then find out that it's some ridiculously small amount, and so they quit. that could be another contributing factor. here's the article: http://www.koreabang.com/2014/stories/classified-salary-infuriates-job-applicants.html

also, i'd like to add that not having a job until after college seems to be the domain of the rich and/or people in the cities. at my rural high school last year we actually didn't have a summer camp because the majority of the students had to get summer jobs to help bring in money for the family.

and all those people you see working at Cafe Bene, GS25, etc., are mainly university students trying to make some cash. it seems that quite a few university students have part-time jobs.

LOL wut? can they just grow a pair finally and start asking questions that matter? who takes a job with no salary mentioned?


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2014, 10:29:00 am »
there was a good article on Koreabang recently about how many Koreans quit their jobs early because salaries aren't advertised along with job postings, and it's frowned upon to ask what the salary is. so a lot of people start jobs not knowing what the salary is until their very first payday, then find out that it's some ridiculously small amount, and so they quit. that could be another contributing factor. here's the article: http://www.koreabang.com/2014/stories/classified-salary-infuriates-job-applicants.html

also, i'd like to add that not having a job until after college seems to be the domain of the rich and/or people in the cities. at my rural high school last year we actually didn't have a summer camp because the majority of the students had to get summer jobs to help bring in money for the family.

and all those people you see working at Cafe Bene, GS25, etc., are mainly university students trying to make some cash. it seems that quite a few university students have part-time jobs.

LOL wut? can they just grow a pair finally and start asking questions that matter? who takes a job with no salary mentioned?

Because they are told it is rude to demand salary and just thank god they have a job.  It's sorta similar how people in the USA are told not to tell their salaries to coworkers.

And I think people are overreacting a bit here.  Someone mentioned before the USA might have been higher in 2005.  The jobs they rate here generally have high attrition rates globally


  • gtrain83
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1755

    • August 27, 2011, 10:26:20 am
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #16 on: July 23, 2014, 10:33:05 am »
there was a good article on Koreabang recently about how many Koreans quit their jobs early because salaries aren't advertised along with job postings, and it's frowned upon to ask what the salary is. so a lot of people start jobs not knowing what the salary is until their very first payday, then find out that it's some ridiculously small amount, and so they quit. that could be another contributing factor. here's the article: http://www.koreabang.com/2014/stories/classified-salary-infuriates-job-applicants.html

also, i'd like to add that not having a job until after college seems to be the domain of the rich and/or people in the cities. at my rural high school last year we actually didn't have a summer camp because the majority of the students had to get summer jobs to help bring in money for the family.

and all those people you see working at Cafe Bene, GS25, etc., are mainly university students trying to make some cash. it seems that quite a few university students have part-time jobs.

LOL wut? can they just grow a pair finally and start asking questions that matter? who takes a job with no salary mentioned?

Because they are told it is rude to demand salary and just thank god they have a job.  It's sorta similar how people in the USA are told not to tell their salaries to coworkers.

And I think people are overreacting a bit here.  Someone mentioned before the USA might have been higher in 2005.  The jobs they rate here generally have high attrition rates globally

I understand that but it's very important for me to know MY salary. The salaries of my coworkers is less important. To find out on pay day is pretty ridiculous.


  • Grimne_Lothos
  • Expert Waygook

    • 845

    • December 28, 2011, 12:56:27 pm
    • Buyeo, south korea
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2014, 10:37:39 am »
This number isn't strange or surprising.   People take the first job they can get coming out of college while still looking for a job they like better.  In Korea this means preparing for the samsung test.  Of course a large percentage of them change jobs quickly.  This would only be an interesting statistic if they limited the sample to graduates getting a job at one of the biggest 5 or 10 companies in Korea.


  • Zeus
  • Newgookin

    • 3

    • January 21, 2012, 04:12:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2014, 10:47:48 am »
LOL wut? can they just grow a pair finally and start asking questions that matter? who takes a job with no salary mentioned?
[/quote]

Most of the University graduates I have coached in employment interview techniques do NOT expect to be able to ask questions in their interview....they think they are only there to answer questions!
Competition for work is intense and they do not wish to aggravate the interviewers.

I just tell them that differentiating themselves from the other candidates is important but they seem to think that non-compliance to the norm is a losing proposition!
Korea is a VERY different first job search environment, to the Western ones we are used to.


Re: 1 in 4 Korean Graduates Quit Job After Less Than a Year
« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2014, 10:49:22 am »
LOL wut? can they just grow a pair finally and start asking questions that matter? who takes a job with no salary mentioned?
First paragraph of the article:
Quote
Mr. Park lost his chance to interview after asking about the annual salary. He said “Annual salary is one of the most important pieces of information when choosing a company. I can’t understand why my question was problematic.”