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  • klstarr1012
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • July 29, 2013, 08:41:15 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
Insults and Compliments
« on: July 16, 2014, 02:19:48 pm »
As the end of the semester comes ever closer I'm faced with classrooms of unruly students and absent co-teachers... In this light, insults have been flying, but it's always the same ones. "Teacher, he's crazy." "Teacher, she's fat."

I've decided enough is enough.

Although I'm currently in elementary, this could work for middle school/high school as well!


So starting tomorrow I'm teaching my 6th graders how to properly give an insult, and before leaving the room, compliments.

The PPT has insults first: how to make insults, some examples, and a short RPS game. Next is the compliments: how to make compliments, examples, and then a game.

Linked is more robust run down of how  to play the Compliment Game: http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/teachersatwork/the-compliment-game/

Also, here is a list of more fun words to show students (although maybe make a print out, because there are some curse words): http://www.englishclub.com/ref/Slang/Insulting/

Let me know how it goes in your classes!
Enjoy!
« Last Edit: July 16, 2014, 02:42:47 pm by klstarr1012 »


Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2014, 02:22:48 pm »
lol spunk bubble, really?


  • klstarr1012
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • July 29, 2013, 08:41:15 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2014, 02:28:37 pm »
lol spunk bubble, really?

Sure! Why not :)
I used to call my brother a bubble butt...

I'm mostly hoping for something new and creative to come out.
You can never be too creative with your insults ;)


  • sarbeck86
  • Waygookin

    • 18

    • February 22, 2013, 05:09:10 am
    • Chungbuk-do
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2014, 02:46:45 pm »
lol spunk bubble, really?

Sure! Why not :)
I used to call my brother a bubble butt...

I'm mostly hoping for something new and creative to come out.
You can never be too creative with your insults ;)
lol spunk bubble, really?

Sure! Why not :)
I used to call my brother a bubble butt...

I'm mostly hoping for something new and creative to come out.
You can never be too creative with your insults ;)



I think he's asking do you understand what spunk can mean (the other definition is definitely not  something you should be teaching your students).


Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2014, 03:02:00 pm »
this easily makes my Top 5 WTF lessons. why would you teach students how to insult someone, of all things? and elementary school students at that. this is wholly inappropriate.

you do also know that 'fruitcake' is a derogatory term for homosexuals? why would you teach them that?
« Last Edit: July 16, 2014, 03:24:56 pm by johnny russian »


Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2014, 03:13:56 pm »
And spunk bubble means semen bubble.  I hope you didn't teach this yet. 


Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2014, 03:28:13 pm »
But, if you want to teach more creative insults, then why did you just choose the bland short, crazy, ugly, stupid, and fat on the How to make an insult slide?

Where is something like this? You are brainwashed by the corporate media juggernaut to consume subpar entertainment. Or: You're likely to fail a big test by a few percentage points therefore condemning you to live a life of unfulfilled mediocrity.  :evil:
Dropbox is the BEST way to coordinate files between home and school. Click here to get it --> https://db.tt/JSMXsrdm


Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2014, 04:09:37 pm »
personally i would've gone for something like this:

http://youtu.be/A8yjNbcKkNY

 :azn:


  • klstarr1012
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • July 29, 2013, 08:41:15 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2014, 08:02:19 am »
And spunk bubble means semen bubble.  I hope you didn't teach this yet.

Wow! Totally didn't know that meaning...
I was going for spunky (like rambunctious) and bubble...


EDIT: In my own ppt I changed spunk bubble to bubble butt and fruitcake to airhead.

However, I would like to point out that many insults we call our friends are sometimes a derogatory word for a group of people. I am in NO WAY promoting such behavior in my students! I just want them to be more creative with their insults...

The main idea behind this lesson was to spend maybe 10mins on insults, but finish with compliments. A vast majority of the lesson is focused on building up our friends.

About to run it with my first class, I'll let you know how it goes :)


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  • Expert Waygook

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    • March 20, 2012, 07:50:46 am
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Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2014, 08:14:26 am »
I think this is completely inappropriate.

Just a few weeks ago I had a girl in tears, because we had learned the word "big", and all of the students started calling her that. I can only imagine what they would have done if they had even more ammo.

I know we insult our friends for fun, but these are children, and they are going to use insults to insult people they don't like. Besides, even if done in a joking manner, insults can still hurt us psychologically when we hear them over and over.


Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2014, 08:48:49 am »
Crayon Pop are adults. we are also adults. you're not teaching adults. you're teaching children. teaching children how to insult each other is still wholly inappropriate.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2024

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2014, 09:05:51 am »
This is just wrong on so many levels I can hardly wrap my brain around it.

Please delete the slides containing insults before you teach this lesson to children.

Then, leave teaching at your earliest opportunity, if you really thought this was anything like a good idea!
Mr. C is not a bad person, in fact is quite a good person here. One of the best people on this forum if you really look at it
-Mr.DeMartino


  • klstarr1012
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • July 29, 2013, 08:41:15 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2014, 09:45:47 am »
Ok! So thanks for all the feedback.

I ran this lesson with only one class; my high level 6th graders. They enjoyed it.

I briefly went over the insults.

The compliment part was by far their favorite.
Students were wanting to be the one without a chair.

Should I delete this thread since no one finds it appropriate?


 


Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2014, 10:01:37 am »
i actually think that the compliments part of the lesson is pretty good. and i do like the ppt. maybe take out the part on insults and expand the compliments part to make it just a lesson on compliments.

@tsarotu, no-one is really being insulting here, people are merely remarking on how it's inappropriate to teach insults to children.


  • yfb
  • Expert Waygook

    • 864

    • July 05, 2010, 11:50:12 am
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2014, 10:25:54 am »
Terrible idea and terrible PPT. The only context in which teaching insults would be appropriate are when you want the students to know when they're being insulted vs. being complimented. It's a good topic for teaching adults. But this PPT just gives them ammo to use against each other. Enjoy your classroom management for the rest of the year! Plus calling someone 'crazy' in Korea has serious negative connotations due to the stigma against mental illness.

To your credit, teaching compliments to kids sounds like a fun lesson topic. Don't see why it has to be lumped together with the insults.


  • iami
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • June 02, 2014, 08:48:17 am
    • South Korea
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2014, 10:58:59 am »
These kids are selective sponges and will retain all the insults and forget the compliments in a heartbeat.


  • TeachaTeacha
  • Expert Waygook

    • 524

    • September 06, 2012, 03:27:09 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2014, 11:00:22 am »
Compliments? Good. Teaching children to be kind to one another? Good. Teaching kids how to be better bullies? So inappropriate. I'm in disbelief that anyone would think this was a good idea. I understand that you're talking about insults between friends - non-insult insults, playful insults. Unfortunately, while some of your students may use these jokingly among themselves, you just gave bullies more to work with in English. Your lesson helps bullies more than anyone, and don't think for a second that the students who are bullied won't remember who taught the bullies those new words. Wow. I just. I can't even...

Edit: I realise I was a bit harsh, but honestly... I was shocked. I completely understand who this lesson is aimed at - the students who run up to you in the hallway, jokingly telling you that their friend is crazy, stupid, strange, etc. Unfortunately, those are not the students who will take the most away from this lesson (unless they are also bullies). Honestly, the insult section of the lesson makes it seem as if you are trying too hard to be the "cool" teacher, as if you're trying to be their friend.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 11:37:58 am by TeachaTeacha »


Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2014, 11:12:53 am »
It almost feels like a parody of what you should teach children. The compliments section was awesome, but the insults section was kind of...mind-boggling. I guess I can understand your own personal struggles in the class, but I am not sure this is the best way to handle it. Maybe you could expand the compliments section to include pictures of "fat" or "short" people, but instead put a positive spin on it, like instead of saying the fat person is fat, you would say she is voluptuous or something else that is positive. But even that is iffy. I would just steer clear of insults all together.


  • Burndog
  • Super Waygook

    • 418

    • July 16, 2010, 11:49:17 am
    • Suwon
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2014, 11:19:22 am »
I hate to join the parade of negativity...but I too find this lesson to be a bit of a train wreck waiting to happen.

Teaching the kids fun or creative insults would be great...but teaching them "You are fat" and "You are ugly" etc is really just asking for trouble.

A rock paper scissors game where the winner gets to insult the loser?  6th Grade students might act tough and brash and all that guff...but they're quite fragile.  The insults that they receive in this 'game' will stick with them long after the lesson is over.

Why not do as others have said and focus on being a positive role model and influence?  Spunk bubble?  Bubble butt?  Four eyes?  Really???  That's what you want your legacy as a teacher to be?  You're the person who taught them to say spunk bubble? 

Aside from that...nothing wrong with the actual ppt, and much respect for the time you've put into the lesson...it just seems a little misguided to me.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2024

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Insults and Compliments
« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2014, 10:45:24 pm »
Saying “wtf” to someone’s idea is a compliment?
Telling someone to quit teaching is a compliment?
Not being complimentary is not the same as being insulting.  OTOH, if anyone had called the OP fat or stupid, I'd be on your side.  Bear in mind though that the OP seems to think this would be appropriate language to use.

I suggested that (assuming the OP thinks teaching insults to elementary kids is a good idea) she should consider a change in career.  I stand by that.  I was not being insulting.

The OP saw that students were insulting each other, but rather than trying to teach them about how it is inappropriate to insult others on account of their looks, body shape, etc, she decides to give them more "ammunition" in the personal denigration steeplechase.

This bespeaks such a lack of empathy, understanding of child psychology and even common sense that she marks herself as a poor candidate for a successful career dealing with young people.  Still, it's possible this could be the kind of learning experience that will set her on the right track.  Here's hoping.
Mr. C is not a bad person, in fact is quite a good person here. One of the best people on this forum if you really look at it
-Mr.DeMartino