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  • philby1985
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    • March 05, 2013, 09:10:49 am
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Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« on: June 30, 2014, 11:30:33 am »
Quote
The Japanese government has cut funding for 80 schools set up for ethnic Koreans living in Japan, claiming they teach North Korean propaganda.

Quote
Enrolments have halved since their peak in the 1980s, but there are still about 80 North Korean schools in Japan and most have connections to sister schools in North Korea.

The students learn in Korean and dress in a formal North Korean style.

Quote
Moon Karyon, 17, says it makes her sad.

"I am the same as any high school student in Japan. Why should I be excluded? I'm proud of my school and what I have learnt," she said.

In the mean time, 17-year-old Kou Sun Dok is excited to take his first trip to the capital of North Korea, Pyongyang.

"I have learnt about the history of my fatherland and how the leaders made it great and now I can see it and learn more," he said.

I've quoted a few select parts above. More of the story at the link below.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-30/japanese-governmet-cuts-funding-for-ethnic-korean-schools/5559178


  • minamteacher
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    • October 05, 2010, 07:55:14 am
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Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2014, 11:47:04 am »
Japanese government cuts funding to 80 NORTH Korean schools.


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2014, 12:14:40 pm »
Well, what do they expect? Does Australia fund and promote North Korean schools? I mean, who would?


  • philby1985
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Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2014, 01:55:47 pm »
Well, what do they expect? Does Australia fund and promote North Korean schools? I mean, who would?

Iím not really familiar with the public/private education arrangements in Japan, but in Australia (provided the curriculum requirement was being kept) the North Korean schools would have the same rights to government funding as any other private/religious school.


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2014, 02:14:04 pm »
Yeah, but that's the thing -- the curriculum. I'm wondering what's in the curriculum at the Japanese schools and whether another nation would be okay with it.


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2014, 02:25:59 pm »
Weird. In all honesty it's not very fair. If the US gutted a bunch of Muslim schools because they taught "Muslim propaganda" there'd be an uproar. Going after this minority within a minority is pretty heartless.

oatmeal is already starting the "but it's NORTH Korea! **** 'em" line of 'reasoning' but at the very least I don't think this is just a matter of course. On the other hand, in Canada the only special subdivision of schools that get public money is Catholic schools and lots of people think even that is bs. I can't imagine Japan makes many special provisions for non-standard education so even if this school was open to everyone and taught all the regular curriculum adding in stuff about North Korea and the North Korean uniforms left them exposed.


  • philby1985
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Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2014, 02:46:31 pm »
Yeah, but that's the thing -- the curriculum. I'm wondering what's in the curriculum at the Japanese schools and whether another nation would be okay with it.

Does Japan have standardized national testing? If they do, and the students sat those tests, I think it is safe to assume that the curriculum requirements were being met.

I highly doubt students sat in classrooms for hours a day leaning about how the evil japanese invaded their homeland. They would have been taught math, english, science, etc, just like any other school.

From the article
Quote
They say education has been politicised and they are becoming hostages to a bitter dispute between the North Korean regime and the Japanese government.

Sounds like a case of "look over there" while politicians put out political fires.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2014, 02:48:27 pm by philby1985 »


  • philby1985
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Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2014, 02:53:32 pm »
On the other hand, in Canada the only special subdivision of schools that get public money is Catholic schools and lots of people think even that is bs.

There are similar arguments in Australia too. Personally, I believe that every student should receive the same amount of government funding for their education. It shouldn't matter if it is public or private (provided the curriculum requirements are met).

In Australia, private schools actually receive less funding per student than public schools, so private schools actually save the government money. Without a contribution from the government, most parents wouldn't bother sending their children to private schools because
a) education outcomes would be the same
or
b) fees would be too much for the family budget to bear.


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2014, 02:55:12 pm »
From the article
Quote
They say education has been politicised and they are becoming hostages to a bitter dispute between the North Korean regime and the Japanese government.

Sounds like a case of "look over there" while politicians put out political fires.

Japan and Korea have always hated each other. Japan specifically hates North Korea for the kidnappings in the 70s the article briefly mentions. Its been a sore spot ever since North Korea outright admitted to it and recently Japan's been trying to make more progress on getting the rest of victims acknowledged at the very least. Dumping on North Koreans schools is adding to the fire if anything.

On the other hand, in Canada the only special subdivision of schools that get public money is Catholic schools and lots of people think even that is bs.

There are similar arguments in Australia too. Personally, I believe that every student should receive the same amount of government funding for their education. It shouldn't matter if it is public or private (provided the curriculum requirements are met).

In Australia, private schools actually receive less funding per student than public schools, so private schools actually save the government money. Without a contribution from the government, most parents wouldn't bother sending their children to private schools because
a) education outcomes would be the same
or
b) fees would be too much for the family budget to bear.

Pressure comes from both sides on the Catholic school issue. Other minorities dislike it because it's obvious favoritism with no logical basis. Non-Catholics dislike it because it's money that could fund secular schools instead. It's not a particularly hot debate these days though. It came up as an issue years ago but fizzled out and hasn't been approached seriously since. Part of the reason being that the Catholic element is more or less a joke. I know a few people that went to my local Catholic school and they're atheist, agnostic, or completely non-practicing Christians. The religious element is so nominal in practice average people have no interested in fighting it.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2014, 02:59:57 pm by Gaikoku.org »


  • Archeon
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Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2014, 03:14:34 pm »

Quote
In the mean time, 17-year-old Kou Sun Dok is excited to take his first trip to the capital of North Korea, Pyongyang.

"I have learnt about the history of my fatherland and how the leaders made it great and now I can see it and learn more," he said.


... No.
I will tolerate your existence only so far as it doesn't infringe on science.


  • ashe1590
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    • August 27, 2013, 01:07:13 pm
Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2014, 03:17:48 pm »
Weird. In all honesty it's not very fair. If the US gutted a bunch of Muslim schools because they taught "Muslim propaganda" there'd be an uproar. Going after this minority within a minority is pretty heartless.

It makes no sense to compare a communist dictatorship to a legitimate religion... They're completely different. Any muslim school wouldn't be teaching propaganda but legitimate religious scholar.


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2014, 03:24:53 pm »
Weird. In all honesty it's not very fair. If the US gutted a bunch of Muslim schools because they taught "Muslim propaganda" there'd be an uproar. Going after this minority within a minority is pretty heartless.

It makes no sense to compare a communist dictatorship to a legitimate religion... They're completely different. Any muslim school wouldn't be teaching propaganda but legitimate religious scholar.

You do realize that you just said "I like this one thing so it's fine but this thing I don't like is bad so it goes away" right? These are people with heritage from North(ern) Korea and they have a right to learn about their history. Korean history goes back more than 60 years you know.


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2014, 03:31:28 pm »
Japan and Korea have always hated each other. Japan specifically hates North Korea for the kidnappings in the 70s the article briefly mentions.

Making broad, sweeping generalizations counts for "reasoning" now, does it?

Until there is more information about the curriculum at these schools, there's no point getting red in the face about their funding being cut. If the schools' curricula are legit, then let them have funding; that's fair. If they're teaching the students something that the Japanese government thinks puts the students at a disadvantage compared to students in other schools, the government can act to get the schools back in line. It's not a free-for-all where everyone takes a handful of cash and does whatever they want because their "culture" makes them off-limits.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2014, 03:34:24 pm by oatmealkooky »


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2014, 03:37:13 pm »
Japan and Korea have always hated each other. Japan specifically hates North Korea for the kidnappings in the 70s the article briefly mentions.

Making broad, sweeping generalizations counts for "reasoning" now, does it?

Why would I have elaborated on points that were only related to a small tangent I was commenting on? Do you really need to get butthurt because I pointed out that immediately leaping on the "It's North Korea though! Who gives a **** about them?" is the kneejerk reaction of people on this site?


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2014, 03:44:46 pm »
I want to know the curricula these schools are using; they're being singled out for a reason, and I think the contents of the school's goings-on could be telling. You're the one conspiratorially assuming it's about being North Korean. Give it up -- you can't read people's minds. Stop desperately leaping to conclusions.


  • wolve
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    • February 10, 2014, 06:25:01 pm
    • Gwangju City
Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2014, 03:51:14 pm »
Weird. In all honesty it's not very fair. If the US gutted a bunch of Muslim schools because they taught "Muslim propaganda" there'd be an uproar. Going after this minority within a minority is pretty heartless.

It makes no sense to compare a communist dictatorship to a legitimate religion... They're completely different. Any muslim school wouldn't be teaching propaganda but legitimate religious scholar.

lollll. 'legitimate religion' & ' legitimate religious scholar' you do realise that every word spoken in ANY church is propaganda, right? Religious beliefs are no more justified than political ones.


  • philby1985
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Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2014, 04:15:19 pm »
I want to know the curricula these schools are using; they're being singled out for a reason, and I think the contents of the school's goings-on could be telling. You're the one conspiratorially assuming it's about being North Korean. Give it up -- you can't read people's minds. Stop desperately leaping to conclusions.

If the government is allowing the schools to stay open and allowing parents to send their students there, I think it is safe to assume that the schools do comply with curriculum standards set by the Japanese government. Education for children in Japan is mandatory. If these schools are not proper schools where students are actually learning and following the curriculum, then they should be closed and students sent elsewhere.

If the schools don't meet the curriculum requirement, then that should be the reason for closing the schools/cutting funding. Not because of "propaganda" they may or may not be teaching.

EDIT: A little research on wikipedia found this. It looks like they are indeed not following the national curriculum.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koreans_in_Japan
Quote
The pro-Pyongyang Chongryon operates 218 Korean schools (Korean: 조선학교/우리학교, Hanja: 朝鮮學校, Japanese: 朝鮮学校) across Japan, including kindergartens and one university. All lessons, and all conversations within the school are conducted in Korean. They teach a strong pro-North Korean ideology and allegiance to Kim Il-Sung, Kim Jong-Il and Kim Jong-un. The textbooks include an idolized depiction of the economic development of North Korea and Songun policy of Kim Jong-Il.[25] They are not classified as regular schools under Japanese law as they do not follow the national curriculum, but rather as "miscellaneous schools" alongside driving schools. This has led to many discrepancies with regular Japanese schools which Chongryon calls discriminatory.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2014, 04:26:01 pm by philby1985 »


Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2014, 05:49:00 pm »
It makes no sense to compare a communist dictatorship to a legitimate religion...

If you pay attention to how the Kim regime maintains its power, you'll note that it very much a personality cult. It's as if David Koresh had an entire state to himself.

As for religious schools: There should be no government financial support. Get secular or GTFO.

As for this: If they're teaching pro-NORK propaganda, to hell with them. If they're teaching, "They're human beings too." and the far right yahoos running the Japanese government right now is stepping on them for that very reason, the LDP can go take a flying leap.


  • qi
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    • July 21, 2011, 12:16:33 pm
Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2014, 10:08:48 pm »
Weird. In all honesty it's not very fair. If the US gutted a bunch of Muslim schools because they taught "Muslim propaganda" there'd be an uproar. Going after this minority within a minority is pretty heartless.

oatmeal is already starting the "but it's NORTH Korea! **** 'em" line of 'reasoning' but at the very least I don't think this is just a matter of course. On the other hand, in Canada the only special subdivision of schools that get public money is Catholic schools and lots of people think even that is bs. I can't imagine Japan makes many special provisions for non-standard education so even if this school was open to everyone and taught all the regular curriculum adding in stuff about North Korea and the North Korean uniforms left them exposed.

Well done Japan, and burn the burka too.


  • yellow_menace
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    • August 29, 2011, 08:55:38 am
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Re: Japanese government cuts funding to 80 Korean schools.
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2014, 07:36:45 am »
The main reason ethnic Koreans (zainichi) had to start their own separate schools in the first place is because of the immense amount of discrimination that Korean students faced in school and in Japanese society in general. And, the reason that a lot of ethnic Koreans identify with North rather than South Korea, is that after the war, the North Korean government did a much better job of trying to provide aid for ethnic Koreans living in Japan and also giving them citizenship. It's not uncommon even now for zainichi who are not affiliated with North Korea to hide their heritage for fear of discrimination.