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  • orangeman
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1769

    • September 01, 2011, 09:56:35 am
    • Seoul-East Side
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #60 on: September 14, 2014, 12:42:17 pm »
General question (not directed at anyone in particular). What rewards system did your teachers implement when you went to school?

I never got stickers, stamps or candy for finishing tasks, bringing our books and pencil cases, coming to class on time or waiting quietly (in 2 lines) outside the classroom. We never had party days for good behaviour.

For me, the reward was always happy parents, happy teachers and a sense of achievement.

I completely agree, and for the first few years in Korea I tried to stick to my guns about academic achievement being a reward in itself.  But later I completely caved.  It's not my country, I'm not here to fix anything.  In Korea, only actions that reap immediate rewards seem to be worthwhile.  Look at personal relationships here, you're my friend until I don't need you anymore and then you're just tossed aside.  Sorry to be harsh, just my observation.



  • philby1985
  • Expert Waygook

    • 662

    • March 05, 2013, 09:10:49 am
    • Daejeon
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #61 on: September 14, 2014, 01:07:16 pm »
I completely agree, and for the first few years in Korea I tried to stick to my guns about academic achievement being a reward in itself. 

I've stuck to my guns here and I refuse to hand out candy or give out stickers and stamps. At the start of the year I made my expectations clear and set out 5 rules to for my classes to follow with a 3 strikes punishment system where if one person breaks the rule, the whole class gets a strike. I've earned the nickname of Mr Serous and it took a few weeks to pull them all into line, but for the most part they all follow the rules and do the activities I set with minimal fuss (though, getting some of my classes to speak can be like getting blood from a stone). It is tiring though, so maybe if I were to spend a few more years here I would cave too.

I should point out that I teach at a middle school, so I'm not sure my hard-line stance would work with elementary.


  • gagevt
  • Moderator - LVL 3

    • 1159

    • August 24, 2013, 01:55:38 pm
    • Gyeongbuk
    more
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #62 on: September 14, 2014, 03:03:40 pm »
General question (not directed at anyone in particular). What rewards system did your teachers implement when you went to school?

I never got stickers, stamps or candy for finishing tasks, bringing our books and pencil cases, coming to class on time or waiting quietly (in 2 lines) outside the classroom. We never had party days for good behaviour.

For me, the reward was always happy parents, happy teachers and a sense of achievement.

I completely agree, and for the first few years in Korea I tried to stick to my guns about academic achievement being a reward in itself.  But later I completely caved.  It's not my country, I'm not here to fix anything.  In Korea, only actions that reap immediate rewards seem to be worthwhile.  Look at personal relationships here, you're my friend until I don't need you anymore and then you're just tossed aside.  Sorry to be harsh, just my observation.

At all levels of my schooling we had party days for doing exceptionally well on tests and what not. Sometimes we got rewards for consistently good behavior etc. but not as much as I have given out during my time here so far. That being said, I've always been very kind, patient, outgoing, and generous with my students. I've played soccer with them many times, introduced them to American snacks, chips, crackers, dip, etc. (Thanks mom and dad). I have earned so much respect from them, only having to crack down a few times with a couple classes. Everyone has their own way of teaching, it's silly to say one style is better than others in all cases. (I know you didn't say this, I'm now just rambling).

All-in-all I think rewarding students is fine, if you do it correctly. For the record I taught middle school. Now I'm at an elementary school that already has a good reward system in place (better than what I was doing last year).
"The man who passes the sentence should swing the sword."


Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #63 on: September 14, 2014, 07:23:54 pm »
It says a lot about the place when kids have to be rewarded for bringing their books to school. Better to let them sleep and be done with it all.


Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #64 on: September 14, 2014, 08:40:17 pm »
There is nothing anti-Korean about this. This is the truth.


  • country09
  • Expert Waygook

    • 653

    • January 05, 2011, 10:04:21 am
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #65 on: September 15, 2014, 08:52:40 am »
I completely agree, and for the first few years in Korea I tried to stick to my guns about academic achievement being a reward in itself. 

I've stuck to my guns here and I refuse to hand out candy or give out stickers and stamps.

I should point out that I teach at a middle school, so I'm not sure my hard-line stance would work with elementary.

This made me laugh. I too teach Middle School and I am picturing myself giving my students stickers for a reward. I don't think that would go over so well.

Candy is great for all ages. Although using it as a reward is a different topic.

____
I think doing basic things that are required and being given a reward for them is extremely counterproductive. When they get into the real world they will have the mentality of 'Oh I showed up to work on time today where is my bonus?' Foreigners who complain about the system of handing out candy for expected behavior yet continue the practice is a little baffling.

Candy as a reward should truly be used as a reward. People need to stop giving it for basic things that are required for every student and give to those who go above and beyond.


  • dizzl
  • Veteran

    • 142

    • September 14, 2010, 01:20:32 am
    • Jeju
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #66 on: September 15, 2014, 11:43:12 am »
This semester with my 6th graders I have put their lessons in their hands. I will not ask them to be quiet, I will not shout, I will not do anything that involves asking them to behave in my class. They are old enough.
If they don't disrupt class they get to play a (an educational) game with competition, the prize is getting to leave class first.

If my class is disrupted and I cannot teach, there is no game and they get to do key expressions written 10 times in class and as homework. The next class starts with a test of those expressions and they can try again to not get punished.

I told them even it's only 2 students the whole class gets punished. They will figure it out and will probably police themselves. Or I get nice quite classes with no teaching while they write  :laugh:


  • Mr C
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1853

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #67 on: September 19, 2014, 07:59:22 am »

I think doing basic things that are required and being given a reward for them is extremely counterproductive. When they get into the real world they will have the mentality of 'Oh I showed up to work on time today where is my bonus?'
So you don't think companies in the "real world" track attendance and timeliness for the purpose of bonuses and raises? 

Quote
Foreigners who complain about the system of handing out candy for expected behavior yet continue the practice is a little baffling.

Candy as a reward should truly be used as a reward. People need to stop giving it for basic things that are required for every student and give to those who go above and beyond.
At my school, no one gets rewarded for any one thing.  Students build up points to earn a "stamp" then build up stamps to earn a "gift", which is a piece of candy.  Surely you can see the character building potential of that.

This is similar to systems I've seen in elementary classes back home.  In high school, I would never give such rewards--at that age, the reward for accomplishment should be fully internalized. 


  • philby1985
  • Expert Waygook

    • 662

    • March 05, 2013, 09:10:49 am
    • Daejeon
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #68 on: September 19, 2014, 08:13:46 am »
I think doing basic things that are required and being given a reward for them is extremely counterproductive. When they get into the real world they will have the mentality of 'Oh I showed up to work on time today where is my bonus?'
So you don't think companies in the "real world" track attendance and timeliness for the purpose of bonuses and raises? 

I've never worked for a company that rewards those things. They have always rewarded hard work, which just so happens to be related to being on time and turning up. I've seen people get fired though for not turning up on time .... I guess the reward is keeping your job :P
« Last Edit: September 19, 2014, 08:16:11 am by philby1985 »


  • Ley_Druid
  • The Legend

    • 2468

    • February 17, 2011, 08:36:33 am
    • Shinan-Gun, Jeollanam-Do, South Korea
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #69 on: September 19, 2014, 08:18:26 am »
I think doing basic things that are required and being given a reward for them is extremely counterproductive. When they get into the real world they will have the mentality of 'Oh I showed up to work on time today where is my bonus?'
So you don't think companies in the "real world" track attendance and timeliness for the purpose of bonuses and raises? 
Office work? Attendance? Not sure, but if you work in retail or fast food, or any service industry job, attendance is extremely important, and remember, the majority of people don't work at high-pay jobs that don't mind much if you aren't at work once in awhile, but yeah, you get rewarded by keeping your job if you are there, generally.

I've never worked for a company that rewards those things. They have always rewarded hard work, which just so happens to be related to being on time and turning up. I've seen people get fired though for not turning up on time .... I guess the reward is keeping your job :P


  • country09
  • Expert Waygook

    • 653

    • January 05, 2011, 10:04:21 am
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #70 on: September 19, 2014, 08:28:35 am »

I think doing basic things that are required and being given a reward for them is extremely counterproductive. When they get into the real world they will have the mentality of 'Oh I showed up to work on time today where is my bonus?'
So you don't think companies in the "real world" track attendance and timeliness for the purpose of bonuses and raises? 

Please inform me of these jobs so I can coast through life by just showing up on time. Someone above already mentioned the reward for showing up to do your job is that you get to keep your job.



  • philby1985
  • Expert Waygook

    • 662

    • March 05, 2013, 09:10:49 am
    • Daejeon
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #71 on: September 19, 2014, 08:31:28 am »
Office work? Attendance? Not sure, but if you work in retail or fast food, or any service industry job, attendance is extremely important, and remember, the majority of people don't work at high-pay jobs that don't mind much if you aren't at work once in awhile, but yeah, you get rewarded by keeping your job if you are there, generally.

I worked in a retail sales environment when I was younger. Never saw anyone get "rewarded" for turning up on time. It was expected. Can't meet that expectation? Goodbye.


  • Mr C
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1853

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Children without knowing failure
« Reply #72 on: September 20, 2014, 06:07:41 pm »

I think doing basic things that are required and being given a reward for them is extremely counterproductive. When they get into the real world they will have the mentality of 'Oh I showed up to work on time today where is my bonus?'
So you don't think companies in the "real world" track attendance and timeliness for the purpose of bonuses and raises? 

Please inform me of these jobs so I can coast through life by just showing up on time. Someone above already mentioned the reward for showing up to do your job is that you get to keep your job.
Snarkiness and ignorance so often go together, don't they?  Reread what I said.   Timeliness and attendance aren't the only factors in considering bonuses and raises, obviously.   But many companies will consider attendance rates when determining raises and giving bonuses, as you will see below.

So here are a few examples I found in five minutes googling, recommending/discussing bonuses for attendance:
 5. Show Your Employees You Appreciate Timeliness
Motivate your employees by acknowledging their accurateness and regularity. The most common incentives offered by companies to deal with attendance issues include special bonuses, extra leave and gift vouchers.
--http://mtimecard.com/blog/how-to-deal-with-employee-attendance-issues/

Bonus schemes and employee rewards strategies are established to fulfil a number of key business and HR objectives: ...To create the desired workplace culture by, e.g. rewarding teamwork and good attendance.
--http://www.ashworthblack.co.uk/bonus-schemes/

Some organizations offer bonuses or awards for such things as ... perfect attendance.
--http://www.flexstudy.com/catalog/schpdf.cfm?coursenum=95033

There are many ways in which organisations are successfully reducing absence levels, and a recent Kronos survey revealed some of the more effective tools that employers use to minimise absence. Around 29% of employers believe that timely return-to-work interviews are the most effective absence management tool whilst 11 percent of employers think that careful monitoring of patterns of absence behaviour is the most effective. Approximately 11 percent believe that offering flexible working is effective and a further 11 percent maintain that awarding an attendance bonus is key to driving up attendance and reducing absence.
--http://www.thehrdirector.com/features/absence-management/predicting-the-unpredictable/

In my experience, I worked at a school which gave a recognition dinner for teachers with perfect  attendance for the year.  And lots of schools have pizza parties for 100% student attenders.