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  • toddsqui
  • Expert Waygook

    • 600

    • November 14, 2013, 02:53:30 pm
    • South Korea
So I finally got around to making my own PowerPoint about comparing things. It's about 30 slides long and includes some exercises that you can review with the students.

I will be trying this out tomorrow.

Enjoy!
I created a small web course for newbie teachers on Udemy here.


  • toddsqui
  • Expert Waygook

    • 600

    • November 14, 2013, 02:53:30 pm
    • South Korea
A note on the word "interesting," which has FOUR syllables. Please see my response below, which I had posted on FB:

"I mean, technically, on paper, the word 'interesting,' does have four syllables. But I would much rather have the students say the words correctly, count on their fingers how many syllables they are saying correctly (irrespective of spelling), and then determine from there what rule they should apply; with all due respect, I feel like this will be a more reliable guide in the long run than looking at the words on paper. Because like it or not, the rules for this stuff are just as auditory-based as they are visually-based, and there are many words in English that violate the rule ON PAPER. I'm teaching conversational English--not the technicalities, as such-- and the slides are meant to be narrated by the teacher who in turn pronounces the words correctly as each slide moves along. And of course, this is to say nothing of those dreaded two syllable words that require "more," despite the rule (e.g. "More useful,") or the occasional word that requires one of those horrible i's before the usual "er" (funnier, uglier), but English is a totally messy language, fluid and constantly evolving just like any other language, and in this process it violates all sorts of stuff. I'll acknowledge these crazy rule-breakers, of course, but I'll also try to give the students some patterns they can recognize and anchor to so that the language is less overwhelming to them. It's a fine balancing act, I think. Hope this clarifies!"
I created a small web course for newbie teachers on Udemy here.


  • toddsqui
  • Expert Waygook

    • 600

    • November 14, 2013, 02:53:30 pm
    • South Korea
I tried this on two second grade classes in middle school today. It worked REALLY well. The students especially liked the Good-Looking Mickey Mouse versus the Ugly Mickey Mouse slide; it was a real attention grabber.

My only regret was making the slides a little too automated. Sometimes I had to stop to explain some vocabulary, but the slides would continue moving on without me.

Still, the class was a great success, and I think this particular powerpoint presentation is probably one of the better ones I have made.

If you try this, let me know how it goes!

-T
I created a small web course for newbie teachers on Udemy here.


I think your comment on interesting is more about the number of stress points than the number of syllables. Whether in your accent, you pronounce it with 3 or 4 syllables, you would still have only 3 points of stress.

Like, if you say it with 4 syllables those will probably be with a stress on the beginning of inter then a smaller stress on the e for the sound of "uh" and then another stress on "sting."

On the other hand, in my midwest US accent, it's pronounced in 3 actual syllables (as in+truh+sting).

Either way, it's got 3 points of stress.


  • toddsqui
  • Expert Waygook

    • 600

    • November 14, 2013, 02:53:30 pm
    • South Korea
Hey Slycordinator,

I really like what you said. Maybe I should change the word in the PowerPoint from "syllable," to "stress?"

My only initial worry is that if I do this,  I won't be able to easily tie in the component of the lesson where I give the students "computer," and "internet," and "television," in the Hangul (which are easy words to translate because they are said the same way in English) and then to explain to them that each "configuration of letters," e.g. things like "한글"  represents what we call "syllables."

Is there anything you would add to this PowerPoint to make the idea of "stress" more clearly defined? I'm very curious. For some reason, my creative juices can't come up with anything for this, at least not right now.

Thanks again for the reply.


T
I created a small web course for newbie teachers on Udemy here.


Well, I think the rule applies to the number of syllables rather than stress points, as there are words that would apply to the rule that have 3 syllables but only one of those being stressed.

Personally, I think the way it's stressed would be better-suited for a lesson on word stress patterns.


  • toddsqui
  • Expert Waygook

    • 600

    • November 14, 2013, 02:53:30 pm
    • South Korea
Got it. Thanks so much for the feedback. I'll make changes accordingly.
I created a small web course for newbie teachers on Udemy here.


i think it should be taught how many syllables a word actually has, rather than how many are pronounced/stressed. i get what you're saying about pronouncing 'interesting' as if it has 3 syllables toddsqui, but i think it's a dangerous road to go down by teaching students that. it's just too subjective.

for example, i had a student yesterday argue vehemently with me that the word 'strong' actually has 3 syllables rather than 1 because most Koreans pronounce it 'soo-too-rong'. then i had another student argue with me that 'rich' has 2 syllables because he pronounces it as 'rich-ee'.


i think it should be taught how many syllables a word actually has, rather than how many are pronounced/stressed. i get what you're saying about pronouncing 'interesting' as if it has 3 syllables toddsqui, but i think it's a dangerous road to go down by teaching students that. it's just too subjective.

for example, i had a student yesterday argue vehemently with me that the word 'strong' actually has 3 syllables rather than 1 because most Koreans pronounce it 'soo-too-rong'. then i had another student argue with me that 'rich' has 2 syllables because he pronounces it as 'rich-ee'.
I don't see why focusing on syllable stress is bad, even if non-native people stress things totally differently than any fluent speaker. In fact, I think it shows the total opposite of this, as they don't even know that when they speak the way they do, they aren't actually speaking English.


  • toddsqui
  • Expert Waygook

    • 600

    • November 14, 2013, 02:53:30 pm
    • South Korea
My lesson went really well.

The students enjoyed the slides, particularly the one featuring Mickey Mouse versus Ugly Mouse. There weren't any questions about the word "interesting." Sometimes the slides went a little too fast for my teaching, but other than this, I would say the lesson on the whole was rather successful. I didn't finish the entire slide in one class, so I'm going to finish it next week. I would say this particular ppt runs at about one hour in length.

This topic is rather tricky, but then again, English is a tricky language and I always tell my students that it evolves over time (in simpler words, of course). Actually, I'm learning Korean right now and when my students complain about English idiosyncrasies (like "interesting," "orange," and "rich"), I usually fire back with my own pocket full of complaints about Korean grammar which, for me, is so difficult that it almost makes me feel nauseous. But I suppose this is a topic for another thread.

Thanks so much for the feedback, everyone!
I created a small web course for newbie teachers on Udemy here.