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  • raysmith
  • Super Waygook

    • 342

    • August 16, 2012, 07:01:58 am
    • Korea
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #200 on: March 29, 2017, 01:57:18 pm »
Yes.

The level of air pollution in Korea is certainly an issue I would consider when making a stay or leave decision.


  • gogators!
  • The Legend

    • 3404

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #201 on: March 29, 2017, 08:11:01 pm »
Yes. It's one of the reasons my exit plan is now in place.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3179

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #202 on: March 30, 2017, 02:47:21 am »
read a news article recently in which the Korea Environmental Corporation was attributing 70-80% of the pollution to China.

they're not about to take responsibility for it any time soon.

don't you know? nothing bad about korea is the fault of koreans.

South Korea joins ranks of world’s most polluted countries

https://www.ft.com/content/b49a9878-141b-11e7-80f4-13e067d5072c

Quote
Prof Kim believes China is to blame for only 20 per cent of South Korea’s fine dust. Environmental group Greenpeace puts the figure at 30 per cent.

Pollution-tracking website AirVisual this week found three South Korean cities and no Chinese cities among the world’s 10 most polluted.

Much of the country’s pollutants come from vehicle emissions and construction or industrial sites. Power plants also play a crucial role — and energy officials are pushing to develop even more coal-powered capacity.
 
The government operates 53 coal-powered plants and intends to construct 20 more in the next five years.



  • flyingspider
  • Super Waygook

    • 345

    • February 27, 2016, 08:33:47 pm
    • Gyeonggi-do
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #203 on: March 30, 2017, 08:02:30 am »
My coteachers were just discussing how Seoul has some of the worst air in the world, and they mentioned how they'd just heard that not all of it is coming from China. Some of it (gasp!) might actually be Korea's fault! They acted like they'd never even considered that possibility before.


Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #204 on: March 30, 2017, 08:15:41 am »
I'd like to know exactly how much of the populace is aware of how much of Korea's pollution is actually local. My coworkers are really careful about what they say about it in regards to that, so it gives me the impression that they're more aware of it than they'd like to openly admit.

I've thought about moving because of the pollution myself. It'll probably happen in the next couple of years, if not sooner, unless the people here start taking the matter more seriously.

I don't understand how people can be so fretful over where their rice comes from, but not give even half of the same fucks about the air quality.


  • macteacher
  • Expert Waygook

    • 679

    • September 03, 2012, 09:59:00 am
    • south korea
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #205 on: March 30, 2017, 10:12:36 am »
I'd like to know exactly how much of the populace is aware of how much of Korea's pollution is actually local. My coworkers are really careful about what they say about it in regards to that, so it gives me the impression that they're more aware of it than they'd like to openly admit.

I've thought about moving because of the pollution myself. It'll probably happen in the next couple of years, if not sooner, unless the people here start taking the matter more seriously.

I don't understand how people can be so fretful over where their rice comes from, but not give even half of the same fucks about the air quality.

i had a discussion with one of my old coworkers who was lamenting how hard it is to travel abroad with children. i asked her why. she responded with, "because we have to pack so much food for our children. korean kids have to eat korean rice, so their brains can grow well"

i think traditional health belief still runs very deep in this culture


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3179

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #206 on: March 30, 2017, 07:10:07 pm »
I've been here 9 years and it's never been this severe.

I was shocked to read this in the Korea Times today:

"The Korean government's data has recently shown that more than 80 percent of fine dust here comes from China."

https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2017/03/371_226633.html

Seems like there's something wrong with that data if it's not in line with other data.


  • iamsam
  • Veteran

    • 99

    • March 06, 2017, 07:56:05 am
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #207 on: March 30, 2017, 08:05:50 pm »
I'd like to know exactly how much of the populace is aware of how much of Korea's pollution is actually local. My coworkers are really careful about what they say about it in regards to that, so it gives me the impression that they're more aware of it than they'd like to openly admit.

I've thought about moving because of the pollution myself. It'll probably happen in the next couple of years, if not sooner, unless the people here start taking the matter more seriously.

I don't understand how people can be so fretful over where their rice comes from, but not give even half of the same fucks about the air quality.

i had a discussion with one of my old coworkers who was lamenting how hard it is to travel abroad with children. i asked her why. she responded with, "because we have to pack so much food for our children. korean kids have to eat korean rice, so their brains can grow well"

i think traditional health belief still runs very deep in this culture

So a college educated person who teaches the future of this country said that? Holy shit.. not sure if Korean is gonna be competitive in the long run.  That is pure idiocy.   Did you just nod an agreement?  I wouldn't be able contain my laughter.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3179

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #208 on: April 02, 2017, 04:21:02 pm »
I also just recently found out that most of the coal plants are on the west coast.

South Korea has been grappling with worsening air quality every year. During the spring months - from March to May - annual sandstorms blowing in from China turn the skies yellow.

The government has pinned the blame mainly on China, releasing data showing that over 80 per cent of fine dust originates there.

But there is growing concern that much of the root cause of the toxic air - estimated to cost the country up to US$9 billion (S$12.6 billion) each year - lies at home, reported the Financial Times.

Economics professor Kim Jeong In said that while the problem originates in both South Korea and China, the South Korean government should replace old coal power plants with natural gas ones, as well as encourage consumers to replace diesel cars with green vehicles.

"Korea should also suggest to China that the two countries jointly research air pollution and share open data on fine particles," Prof Kim told The Korea Herald. "That way, we can pressure China to pay for its own production of the fine dust."

A report published on Thursday in the peer-reviewed international journal Nature said that about 30,900 people in Korea and Japan die prematurely every year owing to fine dust from China.


http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/s-korea-among-most-polluted-nations


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3179

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #209 on: April 10, 2017, 07:47:15 pm »
Wind and Solar technology is not yet efficient enough to take over the grid as of 2017 as much as their technology is improving.

https://qz.com/953614/california-produced-so-much-power-from-solar-energy-this-spring-that-wholesale-electricity-prices-turned-negative/


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3179

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #210 on: April 11, 2017, 05:20:35 pm »
China solar, wind to attract $780 billion investment by 2030 - research report
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-energy-renewables-idUSKBN17D0QV


Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #211 on: April 12, 2017, 07:17:07 am »
I also just recently found out that most of the coal plants are on the west coast.

South Korea has been grappling with worsening air quality every year. During the spring months - from March to May - annual sandstorms blowing in from China turn the skies yellow.

The government has pinned the blame mainly on China, releasing data showing that over 80 per cent of fine dust originates there.

But there is growing concern that much of the root cause of the toxic air - estimated to cost the country up to US$9 billion (S$12.6 billion) each year - lies at home, reported the Financial Times.

Economics professor Kim Jeong In said that while the problem originates in both South Korea and China, the South Korean government should replace old coal power plants with natural gas ones, as well as encourage consumers to replace diesel cars with green vehicles.

"Korea should also suggest to China that the two countries jointly research air pollution and share open data on fine particles," Prof Kim told The Korea Herald. "That way, we can pressure China to pay for its own production of the fine dust."

A report published on Thursday in the peer-reviewed international journal Nature said that about 30,900 people in Korea and Japan die prematurely every year owing to fine dust from China.


http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/s-korea-among-most-polluted-nations

I was listening to the radio yesterday, and although the Korean government puts China's blame at about 75%, they said most studies suggest it is closer to 35% (for small dust particles 2.5 microns, I think?). They are also currently starting a study to see how much of that pollution actually comes from Korean investments in China 9 being that it has lax emissions standards, evidently the number is potentially high, they said).


  • macteacher
  • Expert Waygook

    • 679

    • September 03, 2012, 09:59:00 am
    • south korea
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #212 on: April 12, 2017, 07:50:31 am »
I also just recently found out that most of the coal plants are on the west coast.

South Korea has been grappling with worsening air quality every year. During the spring months - from March to May - annual sandstorms blowing in from China turn the skies yellow.

The government has pinned the blame mainly on China, releasing data showing that over 80 per cent of fine dust originates there.

But there is growing concern that much of the root cause of the toxic air - estimated to cost the country up to US$9 billion (S$12.6 billion) each year - lies at home, reported the Financial Times.

Economics professor Kim Jeong In said that while the problem originates in both South Korea and China, the South Korean government should replace old coal power plants with natural gas ones, as well as encourage consumers to replace diesel cars with green vehicles.

"Korea should also suggest to China that the two countries jointly research air pollution and share open data on fine particles," Prof Kim told The Korea Herald. "That way, we can pressure China to pay for its own production of the fine dust."

A report published on Thursday in the peer-reviewed international journal Nature said that about 30,900 people in Korea and Japan die prematurely every year owing to fine dust from China.


http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/s-korea-among-most-polluted-nations

I was listening to the radio yesterday, and although the Korean government puts China's blame at about 75%, they said most studies suggest it is closer to 35% (for small dust particles 2.5 microns, I think?). They are also currently starting a study to see how much of that pollution actually comes from Korean investments in China 9 being that it has lax emissions standards, evidently the number is potentially high, they said).


good. people forget that korea invests in a lot of those factories that is causing that pollution. supposedly they're right across the sea too.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3179

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #213 on: April 12, 2017, 08:07:51 am »
I was listening to the radio yesterday, and although the Korean government puts China's blame at about 75%, they said most studies suggest it is closer to 35% (for small dust particles 2.5 microns, I think?).

Which radio station / show was this?

This K-newspaper said "nearly 76.4%" came from overseas...but who came up with this figure and how?:

S. Korea fine dust at worst level this year

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20170410000564

Quote
"Seoul saw the problem worsen sharply compared to the past two years"


Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #214 on: April 12, 2017, 09:25:33 am »
I also just recently found out that most of the coal plants are on the west coast.

South Korea has been grappling with worsening air quality every year. During the spring months - from March to May - annual sandstorms blowing in from China turn the skies yellow.

The government has pinned the blame mainly on China, releasing data showing that over 80 per cent of fine dust originates there.

But there is growing concern that much of the root cause of the toxic air - estimated to cost the country up to US$9 billion (S$12.6 billion) each year - lies at home, reported the Financial Times.

Economics professor Kim Jeong In said that while the problem originates in both South Korea and China, the South Korean government should replace old coal power plants with natural gas ones, as well as encourage consumers to replace diesel cars with green vehicles.

"Korea should also suggest to China that the two countries jointly research air pollution and share open data on fine particles," Prof Kim told The Korea Herald. "That way, we can pressure China to pay for its own production of the fine dust."

A report published on Thursday in the peer-reviewed international journal Nature said that about 30,900 people in Korea and Japan die prematurely every year owing to fine dust from China.


http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/s-korea-among-most-polluted-nations

I was listening to the radio yesterday, and although the Korean government puts China's blame at about 75%, they said most studies suggest it is closer to 35% (for small dust particles 2.5 microns, I think?). They are also currently starting a study to see how much of that pollution actually comes from Korean investments in China 9 being that it has lax emissions standards, evidently the number is potentially high, they said).

Of course Korean politicians and bureaucrats don't want to admit that they are corrupt and have been quietly building up coal power plants for years, and are lazy and have been doing nothing about polluting cars for decades. Just keep blaming China and complaining about Dokdo and the proles will be distracted.
Quote
Quote from: Mr.DeMartino on Yesterday at 01:40:32 PM

    Trump is a liar and a con man.


Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #215 on: April 12, 2017, 10:13:01 am »
I was listening to the radio yesterday, and although the Korean government puts China's blame at about 75%, they said most studies suggest it is closer to 35% (for small dust particles 2.5 microns, I think?).

Which radio station / show was this?

This K-newspaper said "nearly 76.4%" came from overseas...but who came up with this figure and how?:

S. Korea fine dust at worst level this year

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20170410000564

Quote
"Seoul saw the problem worsen sharply compared to the past two years"

It was the 7:00am-8:00am segment on 101.3FM. I think the British host's name is Alex, maybe?. They had a professor on the show, and he was just about to get the study of Korean investment and its relation to polluted air under way.


Re: Pollution blues
« Reply #216 on: April 14, 2017, 01:20:09 pm »
If I were to buy a reusable dust mask with replaceable filters, what should I be looking for? (not interested in Vog masks)

Quote
N: Not oil proof
R: Oil resistant (up to 8 hours)
P: Oil proof (beyond 8 hours)
Number: Particulate filters are rated 95, 97, or 100; which corresponds to the percentage of one-micrometer particles removed during clinical trials. A 95 rating means that the filter removes 95% of particles from the air. Filters rated 100 are considered High-Efficiency (HE or HEPA) filters.

I'm looking at something like a 3M 6200 mask, but what would be the best kind of filter if I'm just looking for protection from general pollution? I'm guessing N95 would be enough? Nothing oil-proof? Would those be generally cheaper, too?


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3179

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #217 on: April 14, 2017, 05:39:43 pm »
It does seem to be getting worse here.

The host (who is not that old) said when she was a kid growing up in Seoul the skies were blue.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbSRTXjYVGE

[starts at 10:40]


Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #218 on: April 14, 2017, 08:39:56 pm »
Koreans talking while eating? DO NOT WANT.


Anyway some guy on my local Facebook group who taught English here in the 70's said the pollution in Seoul back then was worse than today. It was probably a lot more localized though and didn't spread throughout the country like it does now.
Quote
Quote from: Mr.DeMartino on Yesterday at 01:40:32 PM

    Trump is a liar and a con man.


  • gogators!
  • The Legend

    • 3404

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Air pollution - bad enough to leave Korea?
« Reply #219 on: April 17, 2017, 09:28:02 am »
Koreans talking while eating? DO NOT WANT.


Anyway some guy on my local Facebook group who taught English here in the 70's said the pollution in Seoul back then was worse than today. It was probably a lot more localized though and didn't spread throughout the country like it does now.
It could have been the tear gas.