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  • Super Waygook

    • 330

    • July 21, 2013, 12:31:10 am
Korea getting fatter
« on: March 11, 2014, 09:52:53 pm »
What do you guys think? I see lots of chubby, fat, and even obese kids in my school and just around town, not to mention adults. To me it's disturbing, my background being clinical nutrition.

I'm someone who always checks nutrition facts and cares what I put in my body, but even my coworkers scoff at it. Yet according to news articles, 3 in 10 adults has diabetes or pre-diabetes here, and that's only gonna go up.

Anyone else have thoughts on this? It sucks for me, because it's so preventable, but the awareness just isn't there yet for Koreans. This is evidenced by the lack of "healthy" food alternatives in the marketplace. Most people just eat or drink whatever, with no concept of an appropriate level of sugar or fat a food item should have.

I quizzed my co-T on a cup of yogurt at lunch the other day, which had 160 cals, which was way too much, given that it was pretty small (maybe 5 oz). I asked her to guess how many cals she thought it had, and she said "300, 400?" which would be INSANE. And I thought 160 was way overboard, but she didn't give a second thought to consuming what she had initially thought was a 300-400 cal small cup of yogurt.

Koreans need to wise up, because the current generation is gonna be in for a rude awakening when they get older (or sooner than that). Healthcare will definitely change in the country as more people will need meds, surgeries, etc. Diabetes, heart conditions, and more are gonna skyrocket quick. And it sucks that kids are getting fat because their parents lack basic nutrition knowledge.

Anyone notice/bothered by this?

http://health.joseilbo.com/html/news/?f=read&code=1327972365&seq=1762
Take that apologists!


Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2014, 09:58:23 pm »
No surprise. Now that you can find Mc Donald's, BK, KFC, Lotteria, etc and unhealthy snacks everywhere in the convenience store, it's bound to happen. People obviously need to teach their kids, but when most kids go to hagwons in the evening and at night (along with the parents too tired from working long hours), it's so much easier to just get some ramen and a few snacks.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2014, 11:35:40 pm by TheEnergizer »


  • EL34
  • Expert Waygook

    • 728

    • September 28, 2013, 07:48:34 pm
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2014, 10:17:09 pm »
Getting fatter? It's been going on for quite some time. It's not a new phenomenon. What's different nowadays is that kids who would have been overweight 15-20 years ago are now obese.


Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2014, 11:30:46 pm »
It's no use telling your co-ts about changing bad habits because they grew up without any time for themselves and living on stuff like ramen just like TheEnergizer mentioned.  Whenever I try to give good advice to my co-teachers (with the nicest earnest looking face possible) I get mean looks and get wang-dda'ed from the "clique" lawl.  If you hint at their bad habits it's kinda like you're threatening their culture or something even though ramen and other crap foods had absolutely nothing to do with ancient Korean history.  But yeah, a lot of Koreans need to start learning that the Korean war is over and that living in survival mode is only good for just that, survival. 


Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2014, 06:34:34 am »
No surprise. Now that you can find Mc Donald's, BK, KFC, Lotteria, etc and unhealthy snacks everywhere in the convenience store, it's bound to happen. People obviously need to teach their kids, but when most kids go to hagwons in the evening and at night (along with the parents too tired from working long hours), it's so much easier to just get some ramen and a few snacks.

Yes, they're falling into the same bad habits that haunt western kids. The blame seems to fall on foreign foods but there are plenty of Korean foods and snacks that are just as bad. It wouldn't be a big deal if these kids were getting exercise but computers and games take care of that.


  • specter13
  • Expert Waygook

    • 791

    • November 29, 2010, 10:00:26 pm
    • Seoul South Korea
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2014, 07:34:25 am »
Yea I know what you mean, I see kids in elementary now that very over weight and some are obese.

I remember when I first got here I was surprised by how high school kids will eat junk food all day long. They are either eating donuts or ice cream between every class.

I have seen signs in the subway now about people being obese though. So there is some awareness out there.


  • withmatt
  • Super Waygook

    • 319

    • March 04, 2013, 08:32:24 am
    • Guri
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2014, 07:40:57 am »
Why I stopped giving candy to my students. 
They are in class and hagwon all day, so they don't have a chance to burn off those empty calories.  also, Korean parents don't really seem to care what their kids eat.


  • 한소로
  • Expert Waygook

    • 783

    • March 20, 2012, 07:50:46 am
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Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2014, 07:45:10 am »
Well there's always liposuction, which is starting to be advertised just as much as plastic surgery.  :rolleyes:

Though, actually I don't really have too many larger students at my elementary school. I had some chubby ones, but they just hadn't hit their growth spurt yet. They tend to even out after that. In my old middle school I can't remember any students that were obese... just a few that I would call an american average.


  • stemarty
  • Featured Contributor

    • 1135

    • September 02, 2011, 12:20:42 pm
    • Jeonnamdo
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2014, 07:45:41 am »
the health issues koreans are facing that will be the hardest issue to tackle. Fast food is a huge change in diet and being so convenient its always going to be popular. Education and moderation of the effects of these foods is so important for children to understand. I hope in the future, Korea will have a better handle of these effects and learn from other countries mistakes.

As for getting fatter, part of me wants to see that. Maybe this country will tone down their constant desire to be stick thin. Remember girls small frame = desirable. 
If Korea get's fatter, maybe stores will finally realize not every woman can be a size 00-3 and add different variety of sizes. I've completely given up on buying pants.

Not that Im saying that its a good thing Korea is getting fatter (health wise). But I'm really tired of their constant vanity ideals to be stick thin. Maybe larger women and ( men ), by this I mean over a size "66" which is a small-medium in the west, will not be seen as "Large" but "normal" and size 12+ will not be labelled as XXL anymore.

Maybe in a perfect world Koreans will get off each others case about their friends weight (like its their business) and leave them alone. Yes, I know what my weight is Vice Principal. I don't need you  to remind me of it every teacher dinner.


  • Ley_Druid
  • The Legend

    • 2465

    • February 17, 2011, 08:36:33 am
    • Shinan-Gun, Jeollanam-Do, South Korea
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2014, 07:54:46 am »
Realistically, 160 calories for a yogurt isn't terrible. A better thing to do would have been to ask her the fat content and more importantly, ask her about the sugar content.

Being a fat guy who is losing weight, it is important for me to explain that calories and sugar are really important in health and weight loss (the two are NOT the same).

Calorie counting is rather beneficial in weight loss, but when it comes to any measure of health, sugar will be more important as how it impacts blood and energy levels.

Realistically, Korean style vegetable dishes are really good for you. If a person was to pair that with lean meats and some fruit, that would be best. Instead, at the high school I work at, the fried foods and rice are the most valued part of the meal. Over eating simple carbs, like white rice, does lead to sleepiness.

When I eat "better" I feel "better" and I don't have to nap after lunch like so many others do. But the thing is finding what one is realistically willing and interested in eating. And for myself, what is easily enough to cook after a full day of class.


  • ajr30
  • Expert Waygook

    • 518

    • September 03, 2012, 01:16:21 pm
    • Yangsan, Korea
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2014, 07:58:51 am »
I think it's more than just what food they are eating. Think about what kind of work Koreans would be doing 50 or 100 years ago. Most of it was much more labor intensive than the work being done now so eating as often as possible was important. My mother in law (Korean) can't understand why I don't want to eat a snack 20 minutes after we just ate lunch/dinner.
This doesn't just apply to Korea but even in the west (or at least, America). I'm from Ohio and it snows. In the winters 10 or 20 years ago, you would go out and shovel that snow. Now, people are buying snow blowers and snow plows that take a lot less calories.

When you spend more electricity to do something, you're probably spending less calories.


  • Boquoi
  • Veteran

    • 109

    • February 23, 2013, 09:48:23 pm
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2014, 08:23:30 am »
I haven't been here long but before coming here I had the idea that everyone here was slim. Not really sure why, and when I got here I soon found out that was not the case.

Realistically, 160 calories for a yogurt isn't terrible. A better thing to do would have been to ask her the fat content and more importantly, ask her about the sugar content.

This. Calories are not a good measurement at all. They are determined by burning food and measuring how much energy this gives off. Completely ignoring how our body digests and utilises different food types.

 


  • Mashley30
  • Super Waygook

    • 356

    • August 31, 2011, 11:47:35 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2014, 08:26:20 am »


I'm always amused when my coworkers scuff at salt and butter, yet are throwing back bread loaded with sugar and rice cakes. those high glycemic foods are going to get ya someday


  • Epistemology
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1906

    • September 19, 2010, 01:57:27 pm
    more
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2014, 08:51:00 am »
Its the sugar. Everything is loaded with astronomical levels of sugar here. Even main meals. That 닭갈비 you may(or may not have) downed last night is packed with it. Those 파전's over there? As sugary as cake!

Away an bile yer heid ya numpty,ye dinnae ken whit yer talkin aboot.


  • scholes
  • Expert Waygook

    • 821

    • May 12, 2011, 10:01:50 pm
    • Beomgye
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2014, 08:52:55 am »
This great for us foreigners who aren't skinny to their standards. hopefully we can get clothes at department stores in the near future that will fit us. I'm just a little chubby, but still struggle to find clothing here that's fits like clothing back home.


  • lazycat
  • Adventurer

    • 62

    • September 02, 2013, 11:28:03 am
    • Pyeongtaek
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2014, 09:44:01 am »
I mean this as respectfully as possible, but I disagree with the thought that Koreans getting fatter is good because it means stores will carry larger sizes. I was slightly (like 3 kg) overweright when I first came to Korea and it never bothered me in America because people always said I was thin. Coming to Korea and being told I was "a little bit chubby" was a huge wake up call for me. I've gotten my diet under control and lost the extra weight since I've been here.
We should see the fact that there are fewer obese people in Korea not as them holding an impossible standard, but as motivation for us to achieve a healthy weight.
Instead of hoping Koreans get fatter, I hope Americans will work to get thinner.


Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2014, 09:46:04 am »
I think overall the Korean diet is far healthier than what we eat in the west. Yeah some of them eat unhealthy food but nothing compared to a larger section of society back home.

I think the biggest health danger in Korea is smoking, its so widespread with very little being visibly done to make people more aware of the dangers.


  • bird212
  • Super Waygook

    • 427

    • May 05, 2013, 01:25:37 am
    • United States
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2014, 09:48:18 am »
I notice this issue in my hs.  Girls are here ALLLL DAY AND NIGHT, so they load up on junk food from the convenience store, all day every day.  They are studying, don't like the school food, etc. 
Get $10 off your first order at www.iherb.com with this code KRG363


  • myungsup
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • March 04, 2014, 12:45:23 pm
    • Yeongju, South Korea
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2014, 09:59:33 am »
OP, you mention both carbs and fats, yet you neglect to bring up the lack of viable protein in the Korean diet (or maybe I hate fish too much). Perhaps, I don't have a nutrition background, but I DO enjoy lifting weights. The way I measure my calorie intake is by conting my macronutrients for the day. In America, that meant weighing out all my food. In Korea, I have to eyeball it, but I do my best to undershoot rather than overshoot. I've yet to find a budget friendly way to eat 160g of protein, 45g carbs, and 50g of fats. Namely the protein. I might just chug some olive oil to hit my fat count for the day.


Aside from macros, the insane amounts of salt in Korean food compounded with the fact that I've very rarely seen people drink water makes me wonder how people's health will deteriorate more and more in the coming years. I'm a Korean-American, but I grew up on predominantly American food. That meant a lot of chicken, brown rice, and greens. In the cafeteria, the soups are too salty, the 반찬 are too salty; rice is my saving grace for my palette, but I'm doing a relatively low-carb cut, so merp.

I also believe there is a critical lapse in awareness in Korea. I know that Koreans aren't exactly trying to get athletic builds, but nutrition is very important among all types of people. Perhaps the macros change drastically depending on lifestyle, but it is important to eat the right stuff. It helps you feel and perform better in nearly every other facet of your life.

I don't know whether obesity or nutrition in general is the greater problem. Better nutrition not only helps the obese people, but it also helps the mal-nourished (in nutrients not calories). I was planning on cutting once I got to Korea, but I can't find any cheap foods that will help me cut well.  I've only been here for a few weeks, so maybe there are some hidden secrets I don't know about, but I hope to figure out how to get my diet in order soon!


  • gtrain83
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1755

    • August 27, 2011, 10:26:20 am
Re: Korea getting fatter
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2014, 10:11:39 am »
OP, you mention both carbs and fats, yet you neglect to bring up the lack of viable protein in the Korean diet (or maybe I hate fish too much). Perhaps, I don't have a nutrition background, but I DO enjoy lifting weights. The way I measure my calorie intake is by conting my macronutrients for the day. In America, that meant weighing out all my food. In Korea, I have to eyeball it, but I do my best to undershoot rather than overshoot. I've yet to find a budget friendly way to eat 160g of protein, 45g carbs, and 50g of fats. Namely the protein. I might just chug some olive oil to hit my fat count for the day.


Aside from macros, the insane amounts of salt in Korean food compounded with the fact that I've very rarely seen people drink water makes me wonder how people's health will deteriorate more and more in the coming years. I'm a Korean-American, but I grew up on predominantly American food. That meant a lot of chicken, brown rice, and greens. In the cafeteria, the soups are too salty, the 반찬 are too salty; rice is my saving grace for my palette, but I'm doing a relatively low-carb cut, so merp.

I also believe there is a critical lapse in awareness in Korea. I know that Koreans aren't exactly trying to get athletic builds, but nutrition is very important among all types of people. Perhaps the macros change drastically depending on lifestyle, but it is important to eat the right stuff. It helps you feel and perform better in nearly every other facet of your life.

I don't know whether obesity or nutrition in general is the greater problem. Better nutrition not only helps the obese people, but it also helps the mal-nourished (in nutrients not calories). I was planning on cutting once I got to Korea, but I can't find any cheap foods that will help me cut well.  I've only been here for a few weeks, so maybe there are some hidden secrets I don't know about, but I hope to figure out how to get my diet in order soon!

truer words were never spoken on this forum. But I used gmarket/11thst/etc and ordered 5.1kg of protein for 63K won. It has 24g per serving. Minimal carbs and fat. Check it below. (though it does contain some soy protein I opted for it due to the fact everything else was ridiculous in price)

http://oneday1.com/html/product_view.php?goods_data=aWR4PTQmcGFydF9pZHg9OA==||

blade muscle 2100 NOT the gold. The gold is prob better quality but  higher price. (only 3kg tubs)