Read 2334 times

  • GinaJie
  • Waygookin

    • 15

    • October 11, 2013, 03:00:26 pm
So, I'm one of the clueless newbies from the 2014 Spring intake. I'm originally from the UK and as this is a tax issue, so people not from the UK might find it hard to answer this? But if anyone could shed some light on this in anyway at all I'd really appreciate it.

Before coming to Korea I got the distinct impression that if I were to apply for a certificate of residence from HMRC I would not get taxed by Korea, but I would continue to get taxed PAYE by HMRC. As Korea's tax is a lot lower than UK tax, I decided I would not bother and would just pay Korea- afterall, this is the place I am living and working. I left the UK without notifying HMRC of anything at all because I assumed that if I'm not living or working in the UK it's none of their business. This was probably the wrong thing to do but I know I'm not alone.

However, my school is insisting I provide the certificate of residence and it doesn't matter that I told them I'm happy to just pay Korean tax, or that I don't think I'm eligable in the first place as I was not in stable work through 2013 so had periods of unempoyment/not paying tax, they still want to before April 9th.

Can anyone clear up just what exactly the certificate of residence does before I toddle off and apply for it?


  • taeyang
  • Moderator - LVL 4

    • 5507

    • September 08, 2010, 08:35:10 am
    • daejeon
use google to search the site

site:waygook.org XXXX

replace 'XXXX' with your search term


  • GinaJie
  • Waygookin

    • 15

    • October 11, 2013, 03:00:26 pm
I am most likely just being dense but I have read through that thread and HMRC website and I still just feel baffled at how it works.

I'm going to give in and get the resendency certificate but I still don't feel happy about it because I don't want to pay UK tax when I'm not in the UK, and I'm still not convinced that won't happen.  :sad:


Just pay the Korean income tax! It's peanuts. You still have to pay the pension and health care regardless.


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 3960

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
You don't have to give your school anything.

They probably see it as "they're helping you so you won't have to pay tax in Korea", rather than "you won't have to pay tax in Korea, but you will be paying UK tax...which is much higher than the former"......you also have to remember that in Korea, everybody is in a hurry to do nothing, so their request may seem urgent at the time, but after a few weeks you'll notice they've forgotten what it was they were bugging you about in the first place.

If they keep bugging you for the certificate, just tell them you're waiting for HMRC to send it to you, and remind them of how mind-numbingly slow British-style bureaucracy is  :P
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 04:01:29 pm by waygo0k »


  • GinaJie
  • Waygookin

    • 15

    • October 11, 2013, 03:00:26 pm
You don't have to give your school anything.

They probably see it as "they're helping you so you won't have to pay tax in Korea", rather than "you won't have to pay tax in Korea, but you will be paying UK tax...which is much higher than the former"......you also have to remember that in Korea, everybody is in a hurry to do nothing, so their request may seem urgent at the time, but after a few weeks you'll notice they've forgotten what it was they were bugging you about in the first place.

If they keep bugging you for the certificate, just tell them you're waiting for HMRC to send it to you, and remind them of how mind-numbingly slow British-style bureaucracy is  :P

God I hope so.
The other thing I was thinking of doing was just sending to HMRC as being a non-resident so UK don't bother me and Korea tax is the thing I'm supposed to pay. My co-teacher gets why I don't want to pay the UK tax and thinks the whole certificate thing is dumb but head office lady is apparently saying it's the law for me to hand this in.


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 3960

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
You don't have to give your school anything.

They probably see it as "they're helping you so you won't have to pay tax in Korea", rather than "you won't have to pay tax in Korea, but you will be paying UK tax...which is much higher than the former"......you also have to remember that in Korea, everybody is in a hurry to do nothing, so their request may seem urgent at the time, but after a few weeks you'll notice they've forgotten what it was they were bugging you about in the first place.

If they keep bugging you for the certificate, just tell them you're waiting for HMRC to send it to you, and remind them of how mind-numbingly slow British-style bureaucracy is  :P

God I hope so.
The other thing I was thinking of doing was just sending to HMRC as being a non-resident so UK don't bother me and Korea tax is the thing I'm supposed to pay. My co-teacher gets why I don't want to pay the UK tax and thinks the whole certificate thing is dumb but head office lady is apparently saying it's the law for me to hand this in.

That's the first time I'm hearing "it's the law" with regards to this issue.

I'm willing to bet it isn't though, simply because there is no reason to have such a law in the first place. I've been in Korea for 3 years and never submitted my HMRC form. My previous school asked me for it but I told them I wanted to opt out of the tax opt-out :laugh:

Perhaps someone else can chime in on whether or not one really does have to submit a residency certificate by law.


You don't have to give your school anything.

They probably see it as "they're helping you so you won't have to pay tax in Korea", rather than "you won't have to pay tax in Korea, but you will be paying UK tax...which is much higher than the former"......you also have to remember that in Korea, everybody is in a hurry to do nothing, so their request may seem urgent at the time, but after a few weeks you'll notice they've forgotten what it was they were bugging you about in the first place.

If they keep bugging you for the certificate, just tell them you're waiting for HMRC to send it to you, and remind them of how mind-numbingly slow British-style bureaucracy is  :P

God I hope so.
The other thing I was thinking of doing was just sending to HMRC as being a non-resident so UK don't bother me and Korea tax is the thing I'm supposed to pay. My co-teacher gets why I don't want to pay the UK tax and thinks the whole certificate thing is dumb but head office lady is apparently saying it's the law for me to hand this in.

That's the first time I'm hearing "it's the law" with regards to this issue.

I'm willing to bet it isn't though, simply because there is no reason to have such a law in the first place. I've been in Korea for 3 years and never submitted my HMRC form. My previous school asked me for it but I told them I wanted to opt out of the tax opt-out :laugh:

Perhaps someone else can chime in on whether or not one really does have to submit a residency certificate by law.

Law? She's having a laugh.


I'm from the UK, I've been here nearly a year. I brought the residency certificate. It means you're exempt from paying tax in Korea for up to two years.  However. I did get a letter sent to my UK address last week saying I need to declare my overseas income for this year. I called HMRC and after speaking to several morons I eventually got through to someone who was actually doing his job properly and told me I didn't need to do anything. It's all very confusing.