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Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #40 on: November 21, 2013, 12:59:42 pm »
You might need the reference down the road.  Even in your own country.  They'll ask what you did for the last year.

Since the end of 2012, China has stepped-up the quality of it's foreign teachers requiring visa applicants to have 2-years of prior documented experience.  This resulted in a decrease of 7,000 teachers across the nation.  No more cowboy teachers and the trend will certainly go to other Asian countries.

Kinda makes you wonder how many of those teachers pulled a midnight run at Incheon International....ts k tsk :wink: :wink:


  • amgoalng
  • Expert Waygook

    • 720

    • August 31, 2012, 08:00:20 am
    • Gobuk, near Seosan, closer to Haemi
Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #41 on: November 21, 2013, 01:10:37 pm »
After reading more comments I would also suggest it is how your school has treated you.  Don't get me wrong, I say finish strong no matter what.  However, I do agree with those who do slack, or take sick time, simply because their school treats them like poo.  I have heard horrible stories.  I may not agree with it, or recommend not finishing well, but I certainly sympathize because it helps ease the verbal and emotional abuse the school might have placed on the person.  In a situation as such, it is hard not give a poo.  My school is great.  I don't know how would react if things were worse.

That said, there are people who take sick days around of their contract, or just because.  I would not recommend it because you never know what will happen to you.  Even if you have a month left, you don't know what will happen in that last week. 


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #42 on: November 21, 2013, 02:41:19 pm »
Just do as others do! Are the other teachers trying hard? Then do that. In my school, most teachers are in movie mode.


Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #43 on: November 21, 2013, 04:30:38 pm »
Just do as others do! Are the other teachers trying hard? Then do that. In my school, most teachers are in movie mode.

At the school in which I formerly taught at, around this time of the year, I was told specifically not to show movies. I was told that it's never okay to just show movies (even after final exams). After exams one day I decided to walk the halls and see what the other English teachers were doing with their classes. One was showing a video/movie. in Japanese. Another was showing a video/movie, in English. I brought this matter up to the co-teacher that had spoke with me earlier about not showing movies. She initially had a look of surprise and said she would look into the matter, but maybe an hour later she said that those teachers had either made promises to the students during the year that they could watch movies after exams, or some other excuse. She said my job was to teach as much cultural information as I possibly could and to waste as little time as possible. I said I felt like I wasn't being treated fairly. Students are nuts after exams are over, what percent of Korean teachers actually teach after exams? Yet the NET is expected to do a full lesson on material that won't be tested on, and students don't give a s***? I am all for doing my best and thinking about the children, I really am, but is it wrong to "just do as others do"?


Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #44 on: November 21, 2013, 04:35:43 pm »
Just do as others do! Are the other teachers trying hard? Then do that. In my school, most teachers are in movie mode.

At the school in which I formerly taught at, around this time of the year, I was told specifically not to show movies. I was told that it's never okay to just show movies (even after final exams). After exams one day I decided to walk the halls and see what the other English teachers were doing with their classes. One was showing a video/movie. in Japanese. Another was showing a video/movie, in English. I brought this matter up to the co-teacher that had spoke with me earlier about not showing movies. She initially had a look of surprise and said she would look into the matter, but maybe an hour later she said that those teachers had either made promises to the students during the year that they could watch movies after exams, or some other excuse. She said my job was to teach as much cultural information as I possibly could and to waste as little time as possible. I said I felt like I wasn't being treated fairly. Students are nuts after exams are over, what percent of Korean teachers actually teach after exams? Yet the NET is expected to do a full lesson on material that won't be tested on, and students don't give a s***? I am all for doing my best and thinking about the children, I really am, but is it wrong to "just do as others do"?

Also, about the teachers making promises to their students, she asked me, with a very negative look on her face,

"did you push the students to well on their exams? I pushed them hard to do well on the exams and promised to show them a movie. Did you do that?"  Um..yes, I honestly do try to push the students to do well on their exams, remind them about the exams, wish them good luck before the exams, yes I do care their future. I'm teaching them the lessons from the book and other topics as instructed to. I did my best.

"Yes, I did."

Look of disbelief.


  • JonnyH
  • Adventurer

    • 29

    • June 21, 2010, 12:07:01 pm
Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #45 on: November 21, 2013, 07:43:16 pm »
I'm not sure that the two options capture all of the available approaches.  I certainly wouldn't dumpster any job on my way out of the door but I can't imagine fighting for a promotion, either.  I took a job prior to contract completion when I left my last PS (that I was only at briefly) and by the treatment of the staff/teachers there, I should have dumpstered the job on the way out the door but ended up sticking around to finish their camps just not to be an asshole.  The best way to exit is where nobody has anything bad to say about you (regardless of reason for exit).  Do your job and do it as well as you have been or as well as you'd like to have.


  • s0nflwr
  • Waygookin

    • 16

    • June 25, 2010, 12:46:36 pm
    • South Korea
Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #46 on: November 22, 2013, 06:16:22 am »
Wow~~~ I can't believe that you really titled this :P if you can't guess who this is.. SHAME on you :P keke

I've been back on US soil for a little over a year now, and it's so sad to hear that they are slowly beginning to cutback and take away positions in public schools. Though maybe that may have be based on a some foreigners taking advantage and not really properly doing their job, I'm pretty sure that for the most part, most people have been working hard to teach their kids/students something...

Coming back to this website and seeing how upgraded the site has gotten and seeing how many people post ideas and their own work is just proof of people working hard! ^^

I encourage you guys to continue to rock it and do your best until the end~~ Though you may not get recognized and hear hearty "thank you's" from the teachers and students, I think that it just feels so much better knowing that you did your best until the end! :)
Hwaeehting!!


  • Mezoti97
  • The Legend

    • 2703

    • April 14, 2011, 03:02:50 pm
    • South Korea
Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #47 on: November 22, 2013, 10:01:49 am »
At the school in which I formerly taught at, around this time of the year, I was told specifically not to show movies. I was told that it's never okay to just show movies (even after final exams). After exams one day I decided to walk the halls and see what the other English teachers were doing with their classes. One was showing a video/movie. in Japanese. Another was showing a video/movie, in English. I brought this matter up to the co-teacher that had spoke with me earlier about not showing movies. She initially had a look of surprise and said she would look into the matter, but maybe an hour later she said that those teachers had either made promises to the students during the year that they could watch movies after exams, or some other excuse. She said my job was to teach as much cultural information as I possibly could and to waste as little time as possible. I said I felt like I wasn't being treated fairly. Students are nuts after exams are over, what percent of Korean teachers actually teach after exams? Yet the NET is expected to do a full lesson on material that won't be tested on, and students don't give a s***? I am all for doing my best and thinking about the children, I really am, but is it wrong to "just do as others do"?

I can relate -- a very similar situation happened during the second semester of my first year teaching in Korea some years ago. My then-co-teacher at that time was adamant about me not showing movies to the students during class (even when it was near the end of the semester before summer vacation and we had already finished the textbook lessons), since she thought it wasn't a good/appropriate activity for the students to do in class. Then one day I noticed one of my DVDs was missing from my desk; the case was there but the DVD inside was gone. I called my co-teacher to ask her if she knew anything about it, and she got extremely embarrassed and admitted that she had taken it to show to one of her other classes (she was also a subject teacher for another subject in addition to English) because "they had already finished the lessons in their book and there was nothing else to do." Hmmm...pretty hypocritical, if you ask me.


Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #48 on: November 22, 2013, 12:40:27 pm »
Always finish strong, no matter what the job is or how you were treated.  I've been screwed by plenty of jobs in the past but always finished strong.  By working hard, hopefully, you will set an example for how others should work, too.  Also, it's about having pride in what you do, whether you're a teacher, the president or a janitor.  Man up, and be a badass.  If anything, it shows that you are better than them.

Also, it'll pay dividends in the future if you ever need a reference.


  • namerae
  • Featured Contributor

    • 207

    • September 26, 2011, 09:38:41 am
    • Anyang, South Korea
Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #49 on: February 06, 2014, 03:32:55 pm »
... EPIK gives us 3 days without a doctors note. What is the meaning of that?

So that people that have the same original thought as you -- don't use them for occasions other than serious illness.

... working here has more or less ruined my health.

I can definitely empathize with you. The way that one's VP and P treat their staff (in effect, your co-teacher and then you) can really make a difference in the way a person chooses to leave their workplace. I work in a private middle school with three other NETs and we are all leaving at the same time due to terrible management and general lack of care, respect, or interest for us and what we're doing here. Not saying that's an original situation whatsoever, but it's happened to us (even after playing by all the "rules" so to say!). I suffered from a bought of depression that really knocked me out for a few months before I was able to take a real vacation away from my normal teaching schedule and work in general. However, telling or "showing" my school that I had a problem would have made everything 10x worse.

Don't give a poo! Your school doesn't give a poo about you. You are nothing to Koreans [...]I got hit by motorcycle and told its not that serious...."you'll be here tomorrow right?"
Take everything and more from Koreans or they'll take it from you!

While this response is incredibly generalizing and racist, I see where the sentiment is coming from. Taewon, try not to lump all Korean people together when talking bad about a few. I know plenty of Koreans that would give the shirt off their backs before I even had time to consider doing the same.

depends on if you are returning to korea to work. if not, just half-ass it. it's the american way.

Because all "Americans" half-ass everything.  :rolleyes:

**

I really do believe that you should give it your all to make your students and upper management happy. Grin and bear it. You might be happy - giddy, even - to leave, but that doesn't mean your job is over yet.

As for the OP mentioning showing movies and getting rejected while others were getting accepted, I'd say that's a pretty common theme in schools. "The Principal doesn't want teachers to show movies" is ALWAYS what the other teachers say, but in practice, they show movies. I walked the halls as you did and saw the history, science, and Korean language teachers ALL showing movies this week. And it makes sense!

This is the final week of classes for my school, with a three week "spring break" before the new semester. If there is no necessary information to give students, there is no need to teach a class on any new material. Movies are a wonderful tool, as long as they aren't used too often. If the Korean language teacher is showing a movie about Korea, the science teacher is showing cool videos on science, and the math teacher is showing something related to math and physics, why can't the NET show a movie in English?

If you're still with me on this incredibly long post, hear me out. I've been teaching in Korea for 3.5 years. I started in hagwon and moved to GEPIK Elementary. That's when the ball game changed. I realized that instead of drilling and doing worksheets and grading papers, I *needed* to "do as others do", not just because it's very typical in Korean culture, but also because I needed to help save face from other co-teachers that didn't put in that much effort. I was going over their heads (they felt) and I needed to tone down my idea of teaching. The next school was completely the opposite! I was asked to make all the materials, games, worksheets, and exams. It wore me out because my co-teachers did little to make classes engaging, but instead stared bleary-eyed into their computers, rabbiting on with administrative work and unable to help me with most things. They started to get upset at me if I asked for translations or advice, and I realized (over time) that it was probably because they didn't put in the same effort that I did, nor did they care too much about the class itself, only the end result.

What I'm saying here is that if you do too much work, you may be put in a position where you're making a higher-up lose face, which will reflect upon you as well. It's better to "go with the flow", "not ask permission, ask forgiveness", and lots of other mantras that I and others have learned working in this culture. That said, I don't think it's a good idea to "slack" in a way that you're not still effectively "teaching" an idea, a theme, or some kind of English. I think movies are fine in your last days, but certainly NOT if you have three whole weeks left! Consider your job, your references, and your future. Don't burn a bridge just because "this is Korea". All experience is important, especially if you've toughed it out for a whole year (or more).


Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #50 on: February 07, 2014, 08:48:38 am »
To those affected by downsizing, or know that they will not be renewing their contracts:

Do you plan on working as hard as you have been? (assuming you have actually been working hard) or will you just coast and not give a sh** until the day you leave? Do you care about the impression you leave behind? Perhaps you will never come back to Korea anyways. But why not just show up to work, do the minimum, get paid, and then leave?

Comments?

You're a reject for even posting this.  My two cents.


  • amgoalng
  • Expert Waygook

    • 720

    • August 31, 2012, 08:00:20 am
    • Gobuk, near Seosan, closer to Haemi
Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #51 on: February 07, 2014, 09:25:42 am »
Has anyone actually used all of their sick days (~11?)? Has anyone used all of them, every year?? haha

This is why I advise caution when it comes to sick days.  Last contract I only had 7 sick days.  I sprained my ankle really bad playing volley ball (tore a muscle, was in a cast for a month).  I took six sick days.  I would have taken a seventh but I wanted one day, just in case. 

Moral of the story: be careful with sick days, you never know when accidents will happen.


  • Dadkinson
  • Adventurer

    • 39

    • November 16, 2013, 08:47:52 pm
    • Boeun, South Korea
Re: EPIK: Leaving: Finish Strong? or Don't Give a Poo?
« Reply #52 on: February 07, 2014, 10:11:27 am »
Depends on your school.
If you have a school that doesn't see you as a teacher, and constantly screws you over, play the game! Get what you need and want out of it. If they don't care about you, why act like a saint?

If you have a school where you have a blast with the kids and your coworkers are welcoming, kind, and helpful, continue to do your thing! You should continue to teach either way, but I know there is a distinguishable difference between a lesson, and a great great lesson.