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  • GEK
  • Veteran

    • 223

    • January 20, 2011, 09:29:56 pm
    • Incheon
Co-teacher emergency
« on: March 31, 2011, 09:48:42 pm »
My co-teacher didn't come to class today.

I called her and she said she said she was busy.

What should I do?


  • Burndog
  • Super Waygook

    • 418

    • July 16, 2010, 11:49:17 am
    • Suwon
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2011, 10:05:45 pm »
My co-teacher didn't come to class today.

I called her and she said she said she was busy.

What should I do?

Talk to her and hope that it makes a difference. Explain your reasons for wanting her to attend class, and needing her to attend class.  At some point in this thread, someone will say that it's illegal to leave you alone with a class full of kids...but it's not.  That's one of the great urban myths...BUT...it doesn't hurt to tell your co-teacher that it's true, and that you won't teach alone because it's against the law!

I did that, and the Principal believed me...made it a rule that I couldn't be alone with more than 20 kids.

Give it a go!


  • LemonWater
  • Super Waygook

    • 338

    • September 09, 2010, 10:45:32 am
    • Gwangju
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2011, 10:12:52 pm »
I'm going to resist the urge for leaving a sarcastic comment here (I'll leave that for others).

If it's happening regularly and you can't handle the class alone, then approach them diplomatically. Explain that the classes go better when they are there, that they are more experienced and you need their help.

If you try quoting the law and telling them that they are obligated to be there, you may get a cold response.


Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2011, 10:16:45 pm »
Welcome to Korea! It happens to the best of us!

Just get on with and teach your class! My co-teachers never come to class! show your authority, show them you are the teacher, and teach your class.


  • De Foaite
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • October 14, 2010, 10:11:48 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2011, 10:34:25 pm »
wait? i regularly teach classes alone, im teaching 'day care' without a coteacher, the kids cant speak a word of english but im not doing my contracted hours so they shoved them in for me to do. i thought this was pretty normal. ive been a teacher here for 2years now, and am comfortable with teaching alone in class. is this something that i should address? i thought it was ok? or rather not a big deal. teach the lesson, do the work, finish while having a bit of fun with the kids, playing games- you're sorted!? should i be having a conversation with my coteachers????


  • Burndog
  • Super Waygook

    • 418

    • July 16, 2010, 11:49:17 am
    • Suwon
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2011, 10:55:08 pm »
It depends on the school...I taught for two years with no co-teacher...but once I was given them I tried my best to get them into the classroom!!!

I would say my best years of teaching were the ones where I was left alone. 


Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2011, 07:26:55 am »
I have a 4 mbps line at home. Its fast enough for my needs. Besides, I mostly communicate with home (S. Africa), and the fastest lines there at the moment are 8mbps (which nearly no one has). So there is no point in me getting a faster line. My ping when playing with friends from home is usually between 15-20, which is not bad at all.

Im in Jungni, just outside Gumi, and my internet seems fine...


  • SBracken
  • Expert Waygook

    • 579

    • March 07, 2011, 07:41:22 am
    • Pohang, S Korea
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2011, 07:34:15 am »
Welcome to Korea! It happens to the best of us!

Just get on with and teach your class! My co-teachers never come to class! show your authority, show them you are the teacher, and teach your class.

haha well said! I completely agree- I teach HS alone. Day one, I heard 'I'm busy, so... sorry' and just assumed- correctly so- that I would always be teaching alone. My students' English isn't that great, so it's been a bit rough letting them know that 'I am teacher, you are student', but they're slowly becoming willing to participate in class. Just make sure you have or develop that gem called 'classroom management'  :D


  • helloana
  • Veteran

    • 80

    • September 08, 2010, 03:25:00 pm
    • Daegu, South Korea
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2011, 07:37:13 am »
I have a 4 mbps line at home. Its fast enough for my needs. Besides, I mostly communicate with home (S. Africa), and the fastest lines there at the moment are 8mbps (which nearly no one has). So there is no point in me getting a faster line. My ping when playing with friends from home is usually between 15-20, which is not bad at all.

Im in Jungni, just outside Gumi, and my internet seems fine...

Sarcasm or did you accidently post to the wrong thread?


  • Briguyman
  • Veteran

    • 118

    • September 09, 2010, 07:56:54 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2011, 07:39:48 am »
My co-teacher didn't come to class today.

I called her and she said she said she was busy.

What should I do?

Talk to her and hope that it makes a difference. Explain your reasons for wanting her to attend class, and needing her to attend class.  At some point in this thread, someone will say that it's illegal to leave you alone with a class full of kids...but it's not.  That's one of the great urban myths...BUT...it doesn't hurt to tell your co-teacher that it's true, and that you won't teach alone because it's against the law!

I did that, and the Principal believed me...made it a rule that I couldn't be alone with more than 20 kids.

Give it a go!

You sure it's illegal? I definitely remember hearing it directly from the EPIK staff.


  • Yu_Bumsuk
  • The Legend

    • 2341

    • March 03, 2011, 02:10:36 pm
    • Hicksville, ROK
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2011, 07:41:16 am »
Welcome to Korea! It happens to the best of us!

Just get on with and teach your class! My co-teachers never come to class! show your authority, show them you are the teacher, and teach your class.

Yes, welcome to Korea indeed. If you need someone to hold your hand you'll be in for a very long year indeed.


  • Ectofuego
  • Featured Contributor

    • 920

    • November 02, 2010, 09:21:10 am
    • Mars
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2011, 07:42:56 am »
In my GEPIK contract is says all non afterschool classes I will be accompanied with a korean co-teacher.  I would ask what was wrong.  Check to make sure it was a necessity in her eyes.  Don't say to much about it beyond that.  If it becomes a regular occurance, than you react to the situation.  Keep backup lessons in case of emergencies.
I'm Jason and I approve this message!


  • JD
  • Adventurer

    • 31

    • February 26, 2011, 03:51:35 am
    • Pohang, Korea
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2011, 07:46:00 am »
Take it as a compliment when your co-teachers decide not to come to class. It means they trust you to take care of their kids.


  • Davox
  • Super Waygook

    • 497

    • February 05, 2011, 03:01:13 pm
    • Ilsan
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2011, 07:47:33 am »
My co-teacher didn't come to class today.

I called her and she said she said she was busy.

What should I do?

Talk to her and hope that it makes a difference. Explain your reasons for wanting her to attend class, and needing her to attend class.  At some point in this thread, someone will say that it's illegal to leave you alone with a class full of kids...but it's not.  That's one of the great urban myths...BUT...it doesn't hurt to tell your co-teacher that it's true, and that you won't teach alone because it's against the law!

I did that, and the Principal believed me...made it a rule that I couldn't be alone with more than 20 kids.

Give it a go!

You sure it's illegal? I definitely remember hearing it directly from the EPIK staff.

My understanding is that it is not illegal per se, but it is against official educational policy, as you are not actually qualified or certified to teach official curriculum public school classes (English or otherwise) in Korea.  After school classes are different because you are not teaching curriculum, just "supervising kids", which anyone can do.


  • S.Lee
  • Super Waygook

    • 274

    • January 24, 2011, 01:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2011, 07:48:10 am »
I'm going to resist the urge for leaving a sarcastic comment here (I'll leave that for others).

If it's happening regularly and you can't handle the class alone, then approach them diplomatically. Explain that the classes go better when they are there, that they are more experienced and you need their help.

If you try quoting the law and telling them that they are obligated to be there, you may get a cold response.

best advice i've read in a while. i wish people would stop referring to their contracts/laws when something is off -especially as a threat (not pointing fingers at anyone, but i know it happens). Its just as easy for them to say "you're fired. no more contract. good luck"
In Asia (not just Korea) contracts and the law aren't as binding as back home (North America). Sometimes I feel like our contracts are just to give us peace of mind.
/rant

Some people I know dont teach until their co-T arrives, so you could always just "wait" lol


Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2011, 07:48:49 am »
I understand that it's a scary situation, but you're just going to have to accept that this isn't an emergency.  If you start to have trouble in class, then pretend like you've gone blind, start knocking everything over, and try grabbing the students, all while screaming.  This has always coaxed English out of my students and they begged my coteacher to never be left alone with me again.

Good luck!  :)


  • klorptar
  • Veteran

    • 134

    • September 15, 2010, 08:35:45 am
    • Ulsan, South Korea
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2011, 07:49:36 am »
Also, not an emergency...


  • lion11
  • Adventurer

    • 64

    • July 19, 2010, 08:17:28 am
    • ansan, korea
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2011, 08:03:23 am »
If you start to have trouble in class, then pretend like you've gone blind, start knocking everything over, and try grabbing the students, all while screaming.  This has always coaxed English out of my students and they begged my coteacher to never be left alone with me again.


awesome.

I've only taught a few classes without my co-teachers, but i prefer it.  Personally i believe my co-teachers translate too much and it gets in the way of the kids learning.  Just do the best you can and show them who's boss.


Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #18 on: April 01, 2011, 08:20:35 am »
I've only taught a few classes without my co-teachers, but i prefer it.  Personally i believe my co-teachers translate too much and it gets in the way of the kids learning.  Just do the best you can and show them who's boss.

Totally agreed!

With one co-teacher who translates too much, I actually see the cloud of confusion cover the faces of the students.  Once they're in English mode, believe it or not, students understand what's going on.  Having all those years of grammar pays off when they have to listen to a few minutes of instructing in English.

TO get back to the post, start getting used to it.  Teachers don't show up, especially if they're elementary teachers.  Maybe they're busy, maybe they're reclaiming last night's dream, who knows.  Just be prepared and have a routine and it won't be much trouble.
You get what you give :)


  • minamteacher
  • Expert Waygook

    • 728

    • October 05, 2010, 07:55:14 am
    • Incheon
    more
Re: Co-teacher emergency
« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2011, 08:54:27 am »
Zombie lesson, STAT!