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  • nen33
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • March 03, 2013, 04:03:46 pm
    • Busan
Question about Korean taxes
« on: January 10, 2014, 06:58:02 am »
Just got informed its tax season in Korea and wondering if anyone else has ever moved from public to private school and gotten their taxes done? If so...how do taxes work if you were exempt under the public school and then moved to hagwon in the same year? I'm assuming my public school income is exempt, but my hagwon income is taxed, just wondering if that's correct.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3942

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Question about Korean taxes
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2014, 07:50:24 am »
Be careful. Some schools withdraw 3.3% of your salary for "taxes" but in reality are just pocketing that money rather than remitting it to the tax office. It's actually really common as they (rightly in most cases) assume the foreigner won't know how to check. In Korea it is the employee's responsibility to make sure the taxes are being paid. Unfair as heck, yeah I know, but that's the way things work. 


Re: Question about Korean taxes
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 09:37:39 am »
Well I teach in a public school and I have to pay income tax. I refuse to move to a hagown. But what I need to know is how I can get income tax refunds if it is possible. If not then that's OK because my income tax rates are not all that expensive anyway.


  • taeyang
  • Moderator - LVL 4

    • 5507

    • September 08, 2010, 08:35:10 am
    • daejeon
Re: Question about Korean taxes
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2014, 09:56:22 am »
Well I teach in a public school and I have to pay income tax. I refuse to move to a hagown. But what I need to know is how I can get income tax refunds if it is possible. If not then that's OK because my income tax rates are not all that expensive anyway.

please look at this thread: http://www.waygook.org/index.php/topic,42077.0.html

your office should deduct tax from your pay every month. depending on whether you're on a flat rate, or progressive scheme, you will only receive a refund if you pay too much tax.
use google to search the site

site:waygook.org XXXX

replace 'XXXX' with your search term


  • nen33
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • March 03, 2013, 04:03:46 pm
    • Busan
Re: Question about Korean taxes
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2014, 06:49:25 am »
er....I've worked at hagwon before, so I'm not unfamiliar with their tax system. I know I have to pay taxes on my hagwon income. I was only under the exemption at my public school (the tax exemption Americans get for working at a public school by submitting their residency certificate).  My question is has anyone ever had any problems with filing their taxes after moving from public school to a hagwon, or is there any other special paperwork to file(other than the paperwork I originally filed for my exemption).