Read 4450 times

  • cc10det
  • Adventurer

    • 41

    • September 03, 2010, 07:17:56 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Background Check within Korea
« on: March 29, 2011, 09:27:30 am »
I am from the USA and planning to change schools after my current contract is ended. Does anyone know if I can skip getting an FBI background check and get a Korean background check instead? since I will have been in Korea since my last background check?  Curious, anyone been through this situation? 


  • nardthefox
  • Veteran

    • 106

    • March 09, 2011, 03:18:04 pm
    • Inje, Gangwondo, South Korea
Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2011, 09:31:37 am »
Are you going home in between? If not, you're good to go already, I do believe. Just get a VISA transfer to a new school and it continues the one you have. If you're leaving...well, word is that it gets more complicated.


  • notinKS
  • Super Waygook

    • 279

    • November 29, 2010, 02:59:38 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2011, 09:58:23 am »
I'm going through the same process right now and I was told you will need a FBI background check.


  • aramella
  • Veteran

    • 168

    • September 15, 2010, 12:01:19 pm
    • Pohang, South Korea
Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2011, 10:03:17 am »
If you need a new visa, I believe you need an FBI background check.  Mine took about 14 weeks to arrive. 


Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2011, 10:05:09 am »
I just transferred schools and hadn't left Korea since the last background check. I had to turn in the FBI check and an apostilled diploma. I was also hoping to just get the Korean police check, but was told no.


Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2011, 10:43:33 am »
I switched schools last year in April, and they told me that I just needed a criminal background check from within Korea (which was really easy to get, so I'm grateful!).  I'm not sure if the rules have changed since then.  Good luck changing schools!!


  • nardthefox
  • Veteran

    • 106

    • March 09, 2011, 03:18:04 pm
    • Inje, Gangwondo, South Korea
Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2011, 10:50:05 am »
Yuck. Somebody in Korea needs to get these laws posted somewhere and updated. What a mess. It's different every year, or at least every couple. I didn't have to do anything last year to get my VISA extended and transferred to a new school. I'm guessing the FBI background has really put things into a blender again.


Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2011, 12:53:06 pm »
This has been discussed before, but I can't seem to find the thread. Just search FBI background check and it should come up.

The answer to this depends on when you arrived. If you arrived in Spring or Fall 2010, you are grandfathered in and if you renew you can skip the background check for one more year. If you just arrived, or if you have already extended your visa, you will need another background check.

But in all honesty, these things change so frequently that your best bet is to the call the MOE and check.


Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2011, 01:05:02 pm »


Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2011, 11:31:12 am »
Just wanted to update my earlier post since our native teacher meeting yesterday:

Turns out, they changed their minds once again and what I said is not true anymore. you need a national background check no matter what. There is no grandfather clause anymore.


  • JonnyH
  • Adventurer

    • 29

    • June 21, 2010, 12:07:01 pm
Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2011, 12:27:19 pm »
The process isn't too difficult but it does take some time and (if you don't have anyone in the US that can run/mail the documents around for you) money.

Print a handful of the FBI CRC fingerprint cards on standard printer paper and take them to your local police station.  The boys at the CSI division (that show is quite popular isn't it) rolled five sets of my prints for free and were pretty careful about getting legible prints (you don't need five but I wanted to make sure that it was done correctly at the time because I've had to wait and wait again having my documents reprocessed due to illegible prints).  Though they're not supposed to accept any gifts for that sort of thing, we just went and picked up some bread at the local Paris Baguette for them as a "thank you" and they seemed happy.

Fill in the creditcard payment form and mail that along with the prints to the address provided on the FBI website.  MAKE SURE EVERYTHING ON ALL SHEETS OF PAPER IS FILLED IN CORRECTLY OR YOU WILL HAVE TO WAIT TO HAVE YOUR DOCUMENTS PROCESSED AGAIN. Also, make sure to include a note stating that you need the document to be signed by so and so for the purpose of obtaining an Apostille.  Just type out a quick "To whom it may concern" cover letter/note stating why you need it, etc.

You can either have some loving family member in the US do the Apostille mail/runaround for you or you can send it to one of the Apostille/notary service companies.  I did the latter and it cost me $150-180 if I remember correctly.  They're quick about that though - a week tops after their receiving the document to get it back in ROK.  The FBI processing is what takes so long.

There're a couple of steps missing regarding how you send it off to them and who the FBI mails the document to (you or a family member) but you can just do what's needed.

Good luck and its advised to do it ASAP though from what I've read, the CRC is only acceptable within three months of its release date.  I'm not 100% on that last part.



  • Periwinkle
  • Veteran

    • 167

    • December 13, 2010, 06:34:34 am
    • South Korea
Re: Background Check within Korea
« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2011, 12:36:16 pm »
After numerous calls to immigration on the issue, new co-teacher and I were able to start a contract without the FBI check  BUT  I changed schools within the same province.  Rules might be different depending on your specific situation.  However, provided you are able to skip out on it this year, you will DEF need it for the 3rd yr (per immigration).