Read 23540 times

Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #80 on: November 15, 2018, 01:46:36 pm »
I mentioned this in another thread, but the office of education in my old town, actually used to get NET feedback.
But, they didn't take it seriously, so they never done anything with it, sadly.

Sorry, I've edited my original post since you've quoted, and yeah, I noticed. It doesn't surprise me, lol. A lot of measures of this type of nature aren't really taken very seriously here because they don't really have the right people placed in charge of it. Then when you mix that in with overall attitudes regarding NETs in general, it becomes a half-assed and failed experiment.


Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #81 on: November 15, 2018, 02:07:42 pm »
****** hell, I ended up combining my thoughts for a different thread into this one.

My rant about NET feedback should have gone into this thread:

http://www.waygook.org/index.php?topic=115695.msg775986;topicseen#new

But meh, it still fits here.

The point I forgot to make here is that I don't think showing a movie during camp is lazy unless that's literally the only thing you do.

Most of these kids don't want to be at camp, and NETs are often not given the resources or support to make these camps super educational. So why rob these kids of fun? And fun includes a movie. I always manage to get my hands on a film that the kids either really want to watch but don't have access to, or something they've never heard of but I know they'll end up liking a whole lot. Movies also make convenient camp themes, helps to build activities around them, and the activities always make a whole lot more sense if the kids have seen the movie.

I always do a trivia game right after the movie to see how well the kids have been paying attention or retaining information. Some of the questions are so hard they're near impossible to answer while most of them are easy to intermediate. Whenever they get one of those "impossible" questions, it's always super funny -- even moreso if one of the teams actually manage to answer it.

tl;dr -- movies can be both fun and educational. Haters gonna hate.


  • Datasapien
  • Super Waygook

    • 396

    • February 04, 2012, 09:36:25 pm
    • Chungcheongbuk-do
    more
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #82 on: November 15, 2018, 02:22:40 pm »
I usually play a movie on the last day of camp related to whatever theme I had decided to do. And I also chuck on a movie in the 'post-exams' week and during the last week of a semester. I do feel a tad guilty (or is it naughty?  :-*) about it though, but haven't had any complaints thus far. At least the kids enjoy it!

Also, what happened to the Piggydee vs Avec posts? I was enjoying those  :sad:
"A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man." - Jebediah Springfield.


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2559

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #83 on: November 15, 2018, 02:24:18 pm »

Most of these kids don't want to be at camp, and NETs are often not given the resources or support to make these camps super educational. So why rob these kids of fun? And fun includes a movie. I always manage to get my hands on a film that the kids either really want to watch but don't have access to, or something they've never heard of but I know they'll end up liking a whole lot. Movies also make convenient camp themes, helps to build activities around them, and the activities always make a whole lot more sense if the kids have seen the movie.

tl;dr -- movies can be both fun and educational. Haters gonna hate.

Yeah I think the overall consensus on this topic is that MOVIES ARE A WELCOMED!!  The 2 or 3 comments that I read on here that want to go on about how "movies aren't enriching to the students and don't engage them to reach their full English speaking potential"  are living delusions of grandeur.  I mean that's fine if you want to be that EXTRA mile teacher and plan out every single day of Winter camp to be packed full of workstations, flash cards that you cut and made yourself, have props that looked like a movie set, and decorate the entire room to look like an the underwater world; but will your kids actually retain any information.  You'd be surprised how some students can learn a new phrase when that match the Korean subs with the English they hear.  Ex. Last summer camp, we watched "Finding Dory."  After the movie was over some of the kids were saying "Just keep swimming" "Just keep swimming."  And who can forget Frozen mania here in Korea.  "Let it Gooooooo"  and "Do you want to build a Snow Man?" were all phrases the kids couldn't get enough of.  And those all came from movies.   

I mean more power to you if you want your kids to make flow charts and complete word association worksheets during your winter camp, but I think the vast majority of us just want to allow the kids to keep their sanity is all. 

(NOTE:  not talking to those poor unfortunate schools that have movie/youtube bans.  I feel for you guys.)
« Last Edit: November 15, 2018, 02:28:12 pm by Piggydee »


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2559

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #84 on: November 15, 2018, 02:25:37 pm »

Also, what happened to the Piggydee vs Avec posts? I was enjoying those  :sad:

Don't feel guilty it's been decided that movies aren't lazy.  And those post are in the garbage where they belong  ;D


Re: Showing movies during Winter Camps: is it considered 'lazy' teaching?
« Reply #85 on: November 15, 2018, 02:34:27 pm »
You'd be surprised how some students can learn a new phrase when that match the Korean subs with the English they hear.  Ex. Last summer camp, we watch "Finding Dory."  After the movie was over some of the kids were saying "Just keep swimming" "Just keep swimming."  And who can forget Frozen mania here in Korea.  "Let it Gooooooo"  and "Do you want to build a Snow Man?" were all phrases the kids couldn't get enough of.  And those all came from movies.   

(NOTE:  not talking to those poor unfortunate schools that have movie/youtube bans.  I feel for you guys.)

Exactly. I don't think some people really quite understand how well kids can retain information when it's coming from something they really like or is relevant to them and their lives in some way. Movies are a great creative source and outlet. Never using them doesn't make you a better teacher.

But I get it. Some people depend entirely too much on entertainment media. Kind of like how some people depend entirely too much on mind maps.