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KT: Blah blah, here's why only Korean mothers are real mothers

*Facepalm*

It's impeccably argued because he uses The Big Bang Theory to explain why American mothers are less loving.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2013, 12:04:04 pm by oatmealkooky »


  • Wintermute
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1196

    • October 06, 2011, 01:07:27 pm
    • MURRICA!!!
    more
bwaaahhahahahahahah aha, doooohohohohohoho.

wow


  • orangeman
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1768

    • September 01, 2011, 09:56:35 am
    • Seoul-East Side
"I have an American friend who, like other American parents, sends her children to their bedroom at 8 o’clock in the evening. I asked, “Why do you send your children upstairs so early?” She answered without hesitation, “I need my own time too.” Of course, she had a point. Nevertheless, it occurred to me that if she were a Korean mother, she would not do that. In the eyes of a Korean mother, it would look too selfish."

Yes, I can see how to a Korea setting boundaries like a bed time for a young child, telling them what to do and trying to mold them into functioning adults instead of spoiled princes and princesses would seem confusing. 

What a moron.  Yet, I'm sure we've all heard similar things from Koreans before.  Amazing how so many Koreans know so much about other countries without ever going there, talking to one of its citizens or even eating its food.

It's also funny how obsessed this guy is with the US.  It's not good enough that book is popular in Korea.  Look!  Its popular in the US, too! Now, what was I saying?  Oh yeah, the US suuuuuucks.


  • Freeto
  • Expert Waygook

    • 629

    • September 10, 2010, 01:24:42 pm
    • Seoul
The writer is a professor of English at Seoul National University?  :rolleyes:
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It doesn't take a genius to speak English. I are to knowing such times. As being.


  • Peekay1982
  • Expert Waygook

    • 613

    • October 04, 2010, 09:12:28 am
    • 부산
KT: Blah blah, here's why only Korean mothers are real mothers

*Facepalm*

It's impeccably argued because he uses The Big Bang Theory to explain why American mothers are less loving.

You're misrepresenting him, breh. He's talking more about general Korean perceptions and portrayals of mothers than definitively stating himself "Korean mothers are better than mothers from other countries". His slightly clumsy English doesn't help, granted.


gee and I thought Jon Huerr and the KT had the monopoly on the anti-us stuff.

Most Korean mothers based on what my students tell me are the spawn of satan denying them a chance of a life just to look better than their cohorts


  • Engrish
  • Super Waygook

    • 324

    • February 15, 2012, 10:56:14 am
It doesn't take a genius to speak English. I are to knowing such times. As being.

Leave him alone. His mother tells him he speaks English very well so it has to be true.
She also tells him he is handsome, smart, articulate, and smells like freshly baked bread.


  • jackdaniels
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1133

    • September 18, 2009, 02:00:00 pm
I think we need to ban topics originating from KT or KH.  ;D

To oatmealkooky: I think in this case it's KH no?  :-[


  • Khanate
  • Veteran

    • 188

    • May 11, 2011, 08:05:38 am
    • Montreal
His book might be popular in the USA because of the large amount of Koreans in the USA, not because it has any redeeming qualities.

Using BBT as a reference is not very good when you consider the amount of evil moms in k-dramas.

Anyhow, the author is trash.


  • Epistemology
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1906

    • September 19, 2010, 01:57:27 pm
    more
How many times do we hear from students that their mothers are the devil incarnate? I don't think I have ever came across a Korean boy who said that he loves his mother.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2013, 02:01:34 pm by Epistemology »
Away an bile yer heid ya numpty,ye dinnae ken whit yer talkin aboot.


I have heard this from many people.  I have a 5 year old and have been chided many a time because he does not go to 8 hagwons and I refuse to play the one up mommy game.  My kid is happy.  He knows he is loved.  He is curious and kind.  That is good enough for me.

I have an american colleague who has a kid in middle school at one of the nicer international schools and she keeps getting crap from the mothers of the korean students about how she isn't a good mother because she doesn't send her kid to hogwons etc despite the kid being at the top of the class etc.

tbph korean mothers are some of the worst mothers out there only ahead of crackhead/prostitute/abusive mothers and that one is a close comepetition


Quote
Indeed, there is an everlasting, tenacious bond between a Korean and his or her mother. In Korea, therefore, mothers continue to live inside their children’s sweet memories even after they are deceased.
First he should read about universal tendencies of motherhood before attaching the word Korean to it, it reeks of ignorance or at the least ethnocentrism. Then, this guy need to read up about lonely old people in Korea who are completely neglected by their children, or Korea's attempt to ban international abortions and society's general distaste for single mothers before making general statements.
He praises a very obvious nearly universal thing and attempts to make it unique. Unless it's perfect let's not talk about it because it will take away from the superiority of things.
Quote
Obviously, mothers in other countries, too, love their children. Their practices, however, can be different from Korean mothers in many ways. Compared to Korean mothers, for example, American mothers seem to be reluctant to forgo their personal lives for their children.
State the obvious. make generalizations about Korea and other cultures again, then move on to subtle criticizing of other cultures for being different.
I would hope many Korean mothers have personal lives and don't infringe on their children's independence especially after they move out, too.


  • a87
  • Super Waygook

    • 330

    • July 21, 2013, 12:31:10 am
Quote
I would hope many Korean mothers have personal lives

They don't. Everything they do is for their children. Which actually means everything they do for their children is to make the family look good, even at the child's expense. One reason I switched from hagwons to public schools was the mothers. They have nothing better to do than to show up to classes unannounced, watch distractingly through the window, and proceed to find things to complain to the owner about.
Take that apologists!


I think we need to ban topics originating from KT or KH.  ;D

To oatmealkooky: I think in this case it's KH no?  :-[

Oops. Well, H... T... One of those things. Whatayacallem -- letters.


  • Harpoinseoul
  • Expert Waygook

    • 682

    • March 23, 2011, 06:49:03 pm
    • Coquitlam, BC
    more
A funny story: My lovely korean wife owns her own piano hogwon and teaches piano. She works a lot with International and Military couples and their children whom according to her are kind and wonderful!
She's gotten to the point where she does not want Korean children anymore, because their adjuma mothers just drive her crazy...blah, blah, my 5 year old son must go to Julliard, blah blah... so basically her hogwan has become restricted to mostly Internationals. ;-)
« Last Edit: September 21, 2013, 12:41:42 pm by Harpoinseoul »
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  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2866

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
The writer is a professor of English at Seoul National University?  :rolleyes:

Who used a comedic television show as evidence for his sociological comparison of cultural family values. *head in hands*
So you think sitcoms are not used in "sociology"?

Well, get your head out of your hands (and the sand)--there are dozens, probably hundreds, of courses taught at the university level in the US treating the sitcom as sociological evidence.  Degree programs, even.

I am not going to attempt to defend the original article here, mainly because it is tedious even for the KH , but surely you noted the five or six caveats he put before making the point, right?

Thank Heavens people in other countries don't look at US TV and think that JR Ewing is a real guy.  Only instructors at SNU do that.  I'm also happy to know that no Americans at all think MASH is a realistic depiction of Korea.



  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2866

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
I have heard this from many people.  I have a 5 year old and have been chided many a time because he does not go to 8 hagwons and I refuse to play the one up mommy game.  My kid is happy.  He knows he is loved.  He is curious and kind.  That is good enough for me.

I have an american colleague who has a kid in middle school at one of the nicer international schools and she keeps getting crap from the mothers of the korean students about how she isn't a good mother because she doesn't send her kid to hogwons etc despite the kid being at the top of the class etc.

tbph korean mothers are some of the worst mothers out there only ahead of crackhead/prostitute/abusive mothers and that one is a close comepetition
In what way s that a close comparison?

And what do you mean by "one of the *nicer* international schools"?  he asks pointedly.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2866

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
A funny story: My lovely korean wife owns her own piano hogwon and teaches piano. She works a lot with International and Military couples whom according to her are kind and wonderful!
She's gotten to the point where she does not want Korean children anymore, because their adjuma mothers just drive her crazy...blah, blah, my 5 year old son must go to Julliard, blah blah... so basically her hogwan has become restricted to mostly Internationals. ;-)
Not especially funny, really.

But, what?  You don't think  there is a huge contingent of "International" parents who *must* get their child into Julliard?  There are pre-schools in every sizeable city in America (you know, only the *best* pre-schools) where parents are fighting for a space before little Princess is even born.

The vast majority of parents, Korean or otherwise, want what's best for their children.


  • orangeman
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1768

    • September 01, 2011, 09:56:35 am
    • Seoul-East Side
A funny story: My lovely korean wife owns her own piano hogwon and teaches piano. She works a lot with International and Military couples whom according to her are kind and wonderful!
She's gotten to the point where she does not want Korean children anymore, because their adjuma mothers just drive her crazy...blah, blah, my 5 year old son must go to Julliard, blah blah... so basically her hogwan has become restricted to mostly Internationals. ;-)
Not especially funny, really.

But, what?  You don't think  there is a huge contingent of "International" parents who *must* get their child into Julliard?  There are pre-schools in every sizeable city in America (you know, only the *best* pre-schools) where parents are fighting for a space before little Princess is even born.

The vast majority of parents, Korean or otherwise, want what's best for their children.

I would say those parents trying to get their kids into special pre-Ks are of a certain group in the West.  On the other hand, overbearing hogwan obsessed parents are pretty much the norm here.  Nothing wrong with wanting the best for your kid, but I suspect the pressure put on kids in Korea has more to do with keeping up with the neighbours than the best interest of the child.  Otherwise, hogwans would be much better here rather than glorified babysitters.  Anyone who has ever worked at one knows what I mean.

It's just anecdotal, but for an example in my PS in a working class part of Seoul my CTs talk about kids who don't attend 'many' hogwans as if they're orphans who will be homeless by the age of 18.  In Canada most parents want their kids involved in extra-curriculars, but that involves a wide range of activities that don't necessarily involve sitting in a lonely classroom for 16 hours a day.  People mock the Western practice of giving everyone an award, but is it any different from the Korean practice of giving every student a passing grade for showing up at least 50% of the time?  If not, the parents will complain and put their kids in a hogwan that will do just that.  Plus social development is valued in the West, as is independence (i.e. PT work or projects).  Those things tend to make Korean parents think we love our kids less. 

I'm not saying one culture loves their kids more or less than the other one.  There are different ways to go about it.  But to everyone who thinks the West gives their kids too much freedom, I point to East's high suicide rates.  We can all learn something from one another.