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  • Shisner
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • January 05, 2012, 04:58:06 am
    • Jinju
SMOE Styles/Structure
« on: September 02, 2013, 09:46:35 am »
I've been teaching in a public school in Gyeongsangnam-do for over 18 months now, and have been considering switching over to SMOE next year. I am curious what people's classroom experience has been in SMOE schools.

At my school I have almost complete control over my lessons: no book, no speaking tests, pretty much complete autonomy. I think this is a comparative rarity for public school teachers, and I really like it. SMOE teachers, I'd be grateful if you'd give a little overview of how you run your classrooms, and how much control you feel you have.

Thanks!
What a happy coincidence:
Earthly and heavenly light
Awakening,
Mingling and becoming
A thought, a passing dream.


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5122

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: SMOE Styles/Structure
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2013, 11:36:38 am »
It will vary from school to school and co-teacher to co-teacher, I don't think one can generalise.

I have most of the say about what goes on in my classroom but the book and speaking tests happen.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • wouldof
  • Adventurer

    • 67

    • February 28, 2013, 09:14:17 pm
    • Seokgwan-Dong
Re: SMOE Styles/Structure
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2013, 03:08:55 pm »
   Quite a lot depends on your co-teachers teaching style or lack thereof.  I've heard stories from SMOE friends on both extremes of the spectrum.  They range from the co-teacher taking complete command of the class and lesson, while the NET is simple a talking parrot as needed.  On the other end the NET literally does almost all of the teaching for their class will the co-teacher sits in the back and maybe manages discipline.

   In my case I work with two co-teachers.  With the first we essentially take turns teaching.  There will be a part that I teach then sit down and she'll take over for her part of the lesson. With my second co-teacher I have what I think is the closest to what SMOE would consider ideal co-teaching where we're constantly changing teaching roles and going back and forth in engaging the teaching the students.  Most of our teaching uses both of our abilities as best as possible.

   You are expected to follow a textbook and often pretty strictly.  There is much more strongly enforced accountability in public schools then I think there as in hagwons.

Tests are almost always made up by co-teachers and you may be asked in helping administer the tests.  Especially speaking tests, for obvious reasons.

   With my situation discipline is often enforced by co-teachers but if you don't like the discipline you'd be better off bringing up the subject after class, maybe while you're lesson planning.  If they don't follow through on your advice/recommendation then you may have a lazy/unmotivated/docile co-teacher.

   Because both my co-teachers respect my English teaching abilities I often have a lot of say in what is taught it class, although I do follow the rhythm of the book and the different grammar points throughout the textbook (because I have to) I often heavily modify the material or use my own made up material to supplement, usually because I have to, to keep the students alert (Waygook helps a lot).  If I'm stuck or am looking for improvements to my ideas my co teachers often help brainstorm better ideas.

   To conclude, I feel that you may not have that much control in the class, with most of your control being in making up ideas to suite the textbook and grammar being learnt.  Keep in mind that SMOE only offers Elementary positions.  So many of the students that didn't/don't have English hagwon classes are learning English for the first time here.  Class sizes can consist of 25+ students. With English ability often varying drastically to those who struggle with the basics to those who you have trouble keeping quiet because they know all the answers already.


  • Shisner
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • January 05, 2012, 04:58:06 am
    • Jinju
Re: SMOE Styles/Structure
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2013, 07:42:57 am »
thanks much wouldof. a very helpful response.
What a happy coincidence:
Earthly and heavenly light
Awakening,
Mingling and becoming
A thought, a passing dream.


  • bjinglee
  • Expert Waygook

    • 545

    • March 10, 2011, 10:29:48 pm
    • South Korea
Re: SMOE Styles/Structure
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2013, 06:56:55 pm »
One thing you failed to mention is the level that you are teaching now and the level that you want to teach with SMOE. Generally speaking, elementary school the CT's are much more hands on. High school you're much more on your own. In some cases, the CT might not come if something comes up. Again, this is generally speaking and not always true.

Every school does things a little different, and your experience will depend on your CT's, principal, VP and students. 


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5122

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: SMOE Styles/Structure
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2013, 12:24:14 pm »
I think there are some people that would say that SMOE has neither style nor structure.

 ;D ;D ;D
There is no known medical cure for stupidity!