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  • asegura32
  • Adventurer

    • 35

    • August 04, 2012, 02:57:14 am
    • California, USA
Teaching through EPIK with California Teaching Credential
« on: July 15, 2013, 04:01:04 am »
I am wanting information from anyone who recently taught or is teaching through EPIK/GEPIK and has a CALIFORNIA teaching credential. My questions is: is the preliminary credential okay or does it have to be the clear credential?

I know you don't need a English teaching credential to teach English in Korea but I am already in the process of getting one. It makes sense to use this to qualify for the level 2 payscale instead of speeding more money and getting  TEFL certificate.

Thanks.


Re: Teaching through EPIK with California Teaching Credential
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2013, 06:44:18 am »
I'm with GEPIK. It doesn't matter: preliminary or clear. A teacher is a teacher and to Korea you have a teaching certificate. For that matter it doesn't matter in the U.S.- you're still a teacher. It just means you're a "young" or just started teacher with a preliminary.

WARNING: I am not saying this to get you down or bad mouth Korea, but if you plan on coming here and plan on using most of that pedagogy you learned, forget about it. Of course your good classroom management skills will come in handy, but unless you plan on teaching at a private school (not hagwon, but a full private school), then things like progress assessment, GOOD scaffolding, and so on, you might be disappointed.

Curious- are you elementary and whereabouts are you getting your credential?


  • asegura32
  • Adventurer

    • 35

    • August 04, 2012, 02:57:14 am
    • California, USA
Re: Teaching through EPIK with California Teaching Credential
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2013, 06:59:32 am »
Thanks for the info. Just curious, do you have a teaching credential? Also, I realize that teaching EFL in Korea is totally different than teaching English here in America or even ESL in general. I am mostly going for the experience of teaching and living in another country and all that comes with that. I want to do this before I settle down back here in America. To answer your question, I will have Single Subject (Secondary) teaching credential. So I will be able to teach English in grades 7-12. Thanks again for the information.


Re: Teaching through EPIK with California Teaching Credential
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2013, 10:07:40 am »
Sorry I can't answer your main question, but I gotta say that as a trained teacher you will probably get frustrated by teaching here, because Korean schools are so different than American schools. Be really, REALLY open-minded or you will be frustrated. Use it as a good experience in getting classroom management practice (Korean kids can be really active and noisy) and practice in teaching ESL. All the education majors I know here are frustrated because they don't like the Korean education system and frankly have unrealistic expectations about it. Basically they have given up. The non-education grad people (like myself) generally have a good time teaching here because we don't have these expectations so we're a lot more flexible and easy-going. If anything we probably actually make better teachers since we haven't given up and we're more engaged and frankly care more about our kids. You CAN teach kids English here and have a good time teaching but only if you are extremely patient (with the kids as well as with the entire national/local school bureaucracy here) and very open-minded.

Sorry about the mini-rant but I think it's something education majors should think about before coming here.

As for anyone who wants to criticize trained teachers for coming here instead of getting a "real teaching job" back home, it's not that easy especially somewhere like California where education budgets have been slashed to the bone. Often coming somewhere like Korea is the only way you can get some experience. Also learning some basic Korean would be useful back in California, especially in LA where there's a pretty large Korean community.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2013, 10:16:49 am by MayorHaggar »
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  • Teemowork
  • Expert Waygook

    • 623

    • September 13, 2010, 08:21:30 am
    • South Korea
Re: Teaching through EPIK with California Teaching Credential
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2013, 11:23:06 am »
Sorry I can't answer your main question, but I gotta say that as a trained teacher you will probably get frustrated by teaching here, because Korean schools are so different than American schools. Be really, REALLY open-minded or you will be frustrated. Use it as a good experience in getting classroom management practice (Korean kids can be really active and noisy) and practice in teaching ESL. All the education majors I know here are frustrated because they don't like the Korean education system and frankly have unrealistic expectations about it. Basically they have given up. The non-education grad people (like myself) generally have a good time teaching here because we don't have these expectations so we're a lot more flexible and easy-going. If anything we probably actually make better teachers since we haven't given up and we're more engaged and frankly care more about our kids. You CAN teach kids English here and have a good time teaching but only if you are extremely patient (with the kids as well as with the entire national/local school bureaucracy here) and very open-minded.

Sorry about the mini-rant but I think it's something education majors should think about before coming here.

As for anyone who wants to criticize trained teachers for coming here instead of getting a "real teaching job" back home, it's not that easy especially somewhere like California where education budgets have been slashed to the bone. Often coming somewhere like Korea is the only way you can get some experience. Also learning some basic Korean would be useful back in California, especially in LA where there's a pretty large Korean community.

It should also be noted that except in some super rare private school situations, you will be teaching English as a second language, rather than various subjects that you might be accustomed to.

To those who are used to lecturing in English back home, it will be a completely different situation here.  The speaking speed and vocabulary will be way above the students heads, and they won't understand a thing except some who might have studied abroad.

Just imagine it this way: You studied korean for a few years in school as foreign language, then you enter a new Korean class where a Korean teacher walks in and starts lecturing completely in Korean.  How do you think that would make you feel?  The speaking speed might be completely beyond your ability to recognize, and you wont catch every bit of vocab.