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  • myochum
  • Waygookin

    • 12

    • March 04, 2016, 07:24:32 am
    • Daegu
Re: Tender Embrace Birthing: having a baby in Korea
« Reply #160 on: May 02, 2017, 11:11:23 am »
What kind of thread is this? The OP is posting a million things and diluting my chance of actually reading the posts of other users.

Can a mod help sort through this or delete?


Re: Tender Embrace Birthing: having a baby in Korea
« Reply #161 on: May 02, 2017, 11:38:09 am »
What kind of thread is this? The OP is posting a million things and diluting my chance of actually reading the posts of other users.

Can a mod help sort through this or delete?

Pretty sure this is the OP's method of advertisement, maybe the mods could get her to pay? make some revenue for the site?


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
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Re: Tender Embrace Birthing: having a baby in Korea
« Reply #162 on: May 02, 2017, 01:24:29 pm »
It's in the blog section that's why it's allowed. You're allowed to link to your blog.

And trust me, my blog barely earns anything. I made a whopping $3.99 last month from Adsense and $2.74 from Amazon and that's from seven blogs total. So average is about a dollar a blog. Far from rolling in it.

I spent HOURS helping women for FREE by answering questions, connecting people so they can get free breast pumps, telling them about the different options here, talking about my infertility issues so that they don't have to go through the heart break I had to go through which lead to crying every single day. Just had one LLL meeting today and will have one Thursday. Plus messaging women at all hours of the day and night trying to help.

 I'm trying to help families in Korea with birthing, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. I don't have a business. I'm a La Leache League Leader. It's a volunteer position. You can find my name on their official website. If anything, I lose money by traveling to peoples' houses to answer questions and help them. I also pay a yearly fee to do this.

On my website, I list OTHER PEOPLE'S businesses and have lists of hospitals and birthing centers. Why? Because I want them to know about the options they have here. Birthing  has come a long way since I first gave birth here 5.5 years ago. I had my first in a natural birthing center and my second was a homebirth that finished in an emergency C section. I've also had infertility issues so I've seen my fair share of doctors and hospitals. I want to share what I have learned over the years and I want to make information available to women here so that they can have access to doulas, birthing centers, breastfeeding support, that they might not know exist.

I know what it's like to go through this in a foreign country, far from home. I was also a single mom here so I know how important it is to have resources available.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 03:04:11 pm by naturegirl321 »
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
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Where to Buy a New Breast Pump in Korea
« Reply #163 on: July 08, 2017, 12:21:43 pm »
Whether or not you need a breast pump depends on you. If you're working and only have 15 minutes here and there, you might want to get one. If you're staying at home, you might not. Here is some info about types of breast pumps and where to find them in Korea,

https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2017/06/where-to-buy-new-breast-pump-in-korea.html

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
The Big Latch On Korea 2017: A Breastfeeding Awareness Event
« Reply #164 on: July 08, 2017, 12:33:17 pm »
August is Breastfeeding Awareness Month. Since 2005, people have been celebrating it with The Big Latch On. This event takes place worldwide. Last year, Korea had it only in Seoul, but this his year it will be held on August 4th in Yongsan, Seoul and August 5th in Songtan, Pyeongtaek.

Breastfeeding, expressing, or pumping moms, their partners, and supporters are welcome. We will have a raffle as well with a number of prizes. If you'd like to participate or donate, you can find out more here, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2017/07/the-big-latch-on-korea-2017.html

I will be organizing the event in Songtan, so hopefully I will see some of you there!

There is also Selfie Sunday and Express Yourself Monday. You can find more info on www.biglatchon.org

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Car seat laws for kids in Korea
« Reply #165 on: September 06, 2017, 12:22:03 pm »
Yes, kids are required to be in car seats and booster seats. Sadly, the small fine is not often enforced. Find out more here, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2017/09/car-seat-laws-in-korea.html

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Sharing Breast Milk in Korea: Donating and Receiving Breast Milk
« Reply #166 on: September 25, 2017, 07:58:34 am »
Not all women are willing or able to breastfeed their baby directly. Some women have more milk than they need. There are a few groups that can help these women find each other in order to donate and receive breast milk. Find out more here, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2017/08/sharing-breast-milk-in-korea-donating.html

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Divorce and Child Support
« Reply #167 on: September 25, 2017, 08:00:02 am »
Unfortunately not everyone has a happily ever after. There are a few support groups out there to help people going through a divorce here, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2016/06/divorce-and-child-support-in-korea.html

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Common Tests and Interventions Done Prenatally, During Labor and Birth, and Post
« Reply #168 on: November 06, 2017, 10:47:09 am »
Here's a comprehensive list of what kind of tests and interventions are usually done during pregnancy and birth.

https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2017/11/common-tests-and-interventions-done.html

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
How to keep your kids (and yourself) warm in winter
« Reply #169 on: December 04, 2017, 10:45:27 am »
I hate being cold, but what's worse than that is when your kids are cold. I've used bubble wrap on my windows, blankets in front of doors, and draft stoppers. Flannel sheets and wool socks are game changers. I'm cheap, so $10+ for a pair of wool socks is a lot, but they last for years. I ship stuff to my parents and get it when I go home on vacation. Uniqlo now has extra warm and ultra warm Heattech and mine have lasted for years.

Schools like to save money on heating, so I bought a nice 2 person heating pad that I stick on my chair at work. At home I use heated floor mats, since even though we have an ondol, it doesn't seem to work that well. No apartment that I've lived in has had a heated bathroom, so I use a space heater. I know water and electricity don't mix, so be sure you're super careful.

Sleeping bags / foot muffs and winter covers for strollers are fantastic and keep my kids super warm. Lambswool seat liners are pretty cozy as well. If you need extra warmth, get those reusable hand pack warmers. Here's more info about all this and more, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2017/12/keeping-your-kids-and-yourself-warm-in.html

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Planning a peaceful home birth after multiple miscarriages
« Reply #170 on: January 09, 2018, 09:08:41 am »
My first child was born in a birthing center over 6 years ago. Despite everything not going according to plan, my birth still went well and I walked out of the birthing center 8 hours later. The second time around, I knew I wanted a home birth. Over the past few years I had become a childbirth educator, breastfeeding counselor, postpartum doula, La Leche League Leader, and Dunstan Baby Language educator. I felt confident in my choice.

I was actually looking forward to giving birth. I wanted to catch my baby and introduce her to her family right away. I knew it would be hard. I didn't get an epidural last time. I did get pitocin and let me tell you: that is not fun. Pitocin makes your contractions stronger, longer, and closer together. This means it's harder for your body's hormones to keep up and you're more likely to ask for an epidural. In my case, that was not an option since the birthing center didn't even have epidurals. Pitocin is the synthetic form of oxytocin.

My first pregnancy was a breeze. Got pregnant the first month we tried. No issues. Baby was born about 2.5 weeks early. I had a long, more than 50 hours labor. I gave birth in the morning and was at home by late afternoon.

This time around was vastly different. I had a multiple miscarriages: 3 in 6 months and had been to 5 doctors at 4 different clinics before finally finding a doctor who would admit there was a problem instead of telling me it was "bad luck".

I found a FB group called KISS for infertility in Korea. I felt like a cheater being in the group. After all, there were women who had been trying to get pregnant for years. I got pregnant at the drop of a hat. I just couldn't maintain a pregnancy. A woman in there suggested I get a certain test. Something that no doctor had tested me for. I spent hours online looking for reasons for multiple miscarriages. I came across the same story, over and over. Women being told there was nothing wrong. Some women had had 5, 10, 15, even 17 miscarriages and doctors were saying it was bad luck. Only 1% of women have 3+ miscarriages in a row. I wrote down all the things that could be wrong. I found out OTC meds that I could take until I got a prescription, so ordered those right away in hopes I could prevent my body from killing another baby.

When I went to the doctor, I went with my little note card and he suggested two tests. One came back normal and one came back abnormal. It was bitter sweet because had the doctors run that test before, I wouldn't have had to suffer so much. The test itself was so cheap too. About 100,000.

I was put on experimental drugs and told to wait for a positive test. Two weeks later, I had it but my levels were too low. They told me to come back in 3 days and if they were high enough, I'd start the IVs. I kept taking my OTC meds, two of which the doctor recommended and one that I found while researching on the internet. Three days later, my levels were high and we started the IVs. I hated every day of being pregnant because I was afraid of miscarriage. 24 weeks is viability, so when I hit that, I could breath a little bit easier. At that time I had private insurance and not Korean insurance. My insurance didn't cover any of the three different meds (both oral and IVs) that I needed since they didn't believe my condition existed.

Due my medical history and the experimental drugs, I was high risk for a miscarriage. This risk dropped around 10-12 weeks. The baby was growing normally until 36 weeks, when her head stopped growing. At that point, there's a plus or minus 3 week room for error, so it could be normal. But of course, you start to panic.

Partly due to the fact that I knew what Korean hospitals were like and partly because I had such a stressful managed pregnancy, I decided to go for a home birth. There are not that many English speaking doctors or midwives who will do home births in Korea. Here's a list of the ones that do, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2015/12/doctors-and-midwives-who-will-do-home.html

Fast forward a few months and it's my due date. I'm supposed to go to the doctor that day, but I'm having mild contractions. My first labor lasted over 50 hours. I called the hospital and cancelled my appointment and then called my midwife. She said she'd be on her way and I'd meet my baby by dinner.

My water broke shortly after that. Your water usually breaks later on in labor. With my first, it broke even before I had contractions. Most places in Korea want you to give birth about 12 hours after you give birth. Not all places. But in general, once your water breaks, you're up against the clock.

My contractions started getting stronger, but I was excited! I thought I must be pretty far along, maybe 7 or 8 cm, but I was only at 4. It was really discouraging to hear that. Then I was told that the baby was sunny side up making the contractions more painful than they should be. So we tried to turn the baby but that didn't work. More bad news: the baby was moving up and not down. This could be good, since it might have meant the baby was trying to turn, but then her heart rate dropped.

Now, being as involved in the birthing community that I am, when I was told her heart rate was low, I didn't panic at all. I knew that high and low are relative and those words don't help you at all. So I asked what it was and she said 90. For a baby, 120-160 is usually the norm.

We talked about other options. Pitocin could help get the baby out, but since her heart rate was too low, it wasn't possible. Pitocin can lower or raise the heart beat even more. My last ditch effort was asking if I could wait an hour. I was told no. We had to go to the hospital then.

Luckily, at the hospital, both my doctor and nurse were on duty. Unfortunately, they kicked both my midwife and doula out. I had no birth plan with the hospital so frantically told them what I want and didn't want.

Then they started hooking me up to so many tubes and machines: EKG, NST, multiple IVs, and more. It was horrible and things went from bad to worse.

I was told I had 8 hours to give birth. I was still at 4cm with the baby being sunny side up.

The nurse came in and told me the baby's heart rate was low. I asked what it was and they said 60. They told me I needed an emergency C-section. And then knocked me out cold.

5 hours later I woke up with amnesia, thinking I was living in Peru and it was 2006 and that I was married to my ex. I couldn't remember being pregnant with either of my kids. I thought I had been in a car accident. The C-section wasn't the worst part. Very limited access to my daughter, who was fine. Her APGAR was 8 and 9. My husband finally held her on day 3.

Not everything is in this post. There's a lot more to it. I ended up with mastitis and MRSA after giving birth which resulted in another 2 night hospital stay, at a different hospital. I'm convinced it was due to only being allowed to breastfed her 5 times a day, instead of the recommended 8-12 was the reason behind it. Being a LLL leader, breastfeeding counselor, and having breastfed my first until she was 4, breastfeeding was not new to me. I shouldn't have ended up with mastitis.

The home labor part is here, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2017/12/home-birth-with-danica-and-jinny-from.html

The emergency C-section and what happened afterwards is here, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2017/12/giving-birth-at-pyeongtaek-st-marys.html

and my blog about infertility due to miscarriages is here https://www.stayinsidebaby.blogspot.com

If you've read this much, I'm sure you have questions and opinions. The reason I wrote this is two fold: to let people know and to come to peace with it myself. I'm not looking for advice or judgment. I'm putting this out there in order to inform people. This has been very hard for me to write. It's admitting failure. I'm involved in the birthing community. I should have been able to have the peaceful home birth I planned. Unfortunately, not everything goes according to plan. This happened a little over a year ago. I wrote everything a few weeks after giving birth and waited until now to publish it. I needed to give myself time to process everything.

I know people think that because I tried a home birth, I ended up with a C-section. That is definitely not true. Had I been in a hospital, I still would have had a C-section. The only difference is it would have happened sooner. I'm 100% convinced that pitocin made her heart rate drop to 60.

Despite the multiple miscarriages and high risk pregnancy, we thought we might have another. We wanted a boy. The birth has traumatized me so much that that just isn't going to happen. We are done. No more kids. My husband is getting a vasectomy. 

I know that giving birth in a foreign country is hard. Infertility is hard. I'd be happy to answer any questions and try to help. I'd also like to recommend this group for infertility, https://www.facebook.com/groups/KISS2013/

I'd also like to encourage you to get a second opinion. People laugh about Googling medical issues. But had I not done my research and trusted the doctors, I would have continued to miscarry. There's a reason doctors carry malpractice insurance. Please do your own research. I found articles and forums with women who had the same problem I had. I found out in the USA, there are only a handful of doctors who will even acknowledge our condition exists. Most just brush us off.

The last thing I'd like to say is that although my birth was nothing short of a nightmare, I would still highly recommend the hospital to women with infertility. The doctor there was the first to take me seriously instead of brushing me off. I was also successfully able to carry a baby to term due to their experimental treatment.
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Understanding Korean Birth Certificates
« Reply #171 on: March 20, 2018, 01:50:33 pm »
Here's some info about Korean birth certificates. They vary place by place. This article has some info about what you might find on your child's birth certificate,

https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2018/01/understanding-korean-birth-certificates.html

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
    more
6 Natural Birthing Centers in the Seoul Area
« Reply #172 on: March 20, 2018, 02:27:56 pm »
Hospitals aren't the only option available for pregnant women giving birth here. There are 6 natural birthing centers that I know of with English speaking staff in the Seoul area. There are probably other natural birthing centers, but English might not be spoken there. Some of these places even have the ability to do C-sections, if necessary. You can find more info here, https://tenderembracebirthing.blogspot.com/2018/03/6-natural-birthing-centers-in-seoul.html

On my FB page you can also find useful links and updates, (https://www.facebook.com/TenderEmbraceBirthing?fref=tsf)
The best TEFL jobs in Korea on TEFL Tips.
Tender Embrace Birthing: childbirth classes, doulas, breastfeeding support, and info about giving birth in Korea