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Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #40 on: November 08, 2011, 02:08:59 pm »
Yay...Im so glad to see others are teaching from this book....and that you find it ridiculous and disjointed too. I noticed that someone else made a request for us to put the materials for this book in order, has that been done? If so could someone point me in the right direction and I will add and steal. If not, is it something that people would still like to be done?


  • mycombs
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    • September 03, 2010, 06:39:03 am
    • Seoul
Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #41 on: November 15, 2011, 03:16:21 pm »
I noticed that someone else made a request for us to put the materials for this book in order, has that been done? If so could someone point me in the right direction and I will add and steal. If not, is it something that people would still like to be done?
Sure! If you have materials everyone, please post them here ! I think we can all use help with these lessons. Especially any ideas people have for making the "Talk Together" section usable...
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Grade 2 Lesson 10
« Reply #42 on: November 15, 2011, 03:54:23 pm »
I just finished Lesson 10 with my 2nd Graders, and I thought my PowerPoint went over well; here it is! It took two and a half lessons, so don't try to cram everything into one because it's too much information.

For the first lesson, I started out with some vocabulary (guess the picture, basically) from the story, but because I only go to this school once a week, I didn't delve too far into it - their Korean English teacher takes care of that the rest of the days I'm not there. I think it's worth noting, as well, that the students get a vocabulary sheet with Korean translations from their teacher, so your kids might not be able to guess the pictures. After that, I went over different greetings for several holidays (including the ones in the book). I also made sure to correct the answers in the text (i.e. not "Happy Thanksgiving DAY" but "Happy Thanksgiving). Next, I went into gift-giving because the book says that you get Thanksgiving gifts, when, in fact, you don't. I wish I did, but I guess pie's enough. I didn't have time to go into Korean holidays, but you could certainly incorporate those if you want. Then, Part B: I have pictures of the people in the book and several K-Pop groups that elicited some great reactions. Super easy. By the way, I always go into the grammar/content before I have them read out of the textbook, so there are slides after the main content that say to go to a certain part in the book. I had a little time for a game at the end, so I used the Simpsons game from Daejeon.

For the second (and a half) lesson, I finished the game, and then, I went into the "Let's Communicate" part and used several pictures from things around Korea (some might not be known by other students outside of Jeollanam-do, though) and America to ask the students if they had heard of them. Listen and repeat for the "Go" part (if students are talking, I make them read this section out loud, but I didn't have any problems today) and onto the story. I played "Popcorn" reading, where students read until they want to stop, then say, "Popcorn, [insert another student's name here]." You might want to give a limit, if your kids are super talkative, or a minimum, if they aren't. After that, there is a short comprehension quiz, which you can make into a game if your kids are being good, or into a test/call-on-the-talkers thing, if they're not. Then, I asked them to name different talents from the provided pictures and then, tell me theirs, with a little presentation (picture and sentence on a paper).

And that's it! Haha. A little long, I guess, but I like to be thorough. Also, for the second lesson, I used the Nat King Cole song "Unforgettable" as a warm-up, but I won't upload it here - you can easily find it on YouTube.

Let me know if it works for you, or if you have any questions! Good luck (I hate this book.)!
« Last Edit: November 15, 2011, 03:56:41 pm by iheartzero »


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #43 on: November 17, 2011, 01:35:20 pm »
Hi

Here are the ppt.s I used for the first grade Lesson 12. Its based on the write and lets talk part of the activity book. Im not great with ppt so feel free to make these more beautiful/useful/educational as you see fit. I teach first grade twice a week so I usually make each lesson in the book last two weeks so Ill post part 4 once I've finished it.

Hope theyre of some help to someone :)


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #44 on: November 17, 2011, 01:43:22 pm »
Here is 2nd grade Lesson 12. I always start my lessons with a game, sometimes its games Ive stolen from other waygook users (thanks) and sometimes its relating the vocab list for that chapter which is what the random pics are at the beginning of my slide. Again sorry about the poor quality of my ppts.

I also cant take credit for the worksheets, I found them on the net somewhere and modified them for this lesson.


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #45 on: November 17, 2011, 01:56:09 pm »
These are the materials I used for grade 2 lesson 11

The enlarged picture/optical illusions and drawings game I stole from the net somewhere and I cant find the sites now to credit them (sorry).

I think most of it is pretty self explanatory. The weird childlike drawings are what I described to my kids and then had them draw. Then I got them to do their own and describe them to their friends. My kids found this really hard and it took almost two lessons to do.

The optical illusions (playing card and dragon) I gave to the kids to make in lesson 4. Most of the written instructions on the dragon were easy for them to follow. I made half the kids make the cards and half the kids make the dragon (i made one myself first as a model) then when they had finished they had to take their optical illusion to someone who hadn't made the same thing and explain it to them (They basically re-wrote the instructions on the paper for the dragon and the instructional slide for the card).

Hope this makes sense Im in a bit of a rush, shout if you want any more clarification.



Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #46 on: November 17, 2011, 02:59:48 pm »
Just a little something to add, if you have a Korean keyboard, then at the start of the chapter where it tells you what they will be studying, if you type that into google translate, then everything becomes clearer of what they should be learning, they just give really crap examples in English, so for example, chapter 10, the speaking part of  the book they should be learning how  to give and respond  to compliments, I think that is section A, how to ask for information, I think question B and how to report information, again I think question B, once you know this, it makes it much easier to plan your lessons and do a lot more fun stuff.


  • woman-king
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Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #47 on: February 25, 2012, 10:23:35 pm »
Just a little something to add, if you have a Korean keyboard, then at the start of the chapter where it tells you what they will be studying, if you type that into google translate, then everything becomes clearer of what they should be learning, they just give really crap examples in English, so for example, chapter 10, the speaking part of  the book they should be learning how  to give and respond  to compliments, I think that is section A, how to ask for information, I think question B and how to report information, again I think question B, once you know this, it makes it much easier to plan your lessons and do a lot more fun stuff.

Oh yes, but of course English-speaking teachers are just expected to know this information through, I don't know, nunchi or something.  Lots of deer-in-headlights expressions when I've tried to point this out/ask for some translation help.   ::)

My school just ordered fresh new sets of these useless tomes, so I'll be using them again this year--but while last year I stuck strictly to the CD, this year new co-teachers want me to come up with speaking activities for each chapter.  Any ideas on how to organize the material into something resembling speaking activities? 
 
ALSO: Any ideas on places online to get the teacher's resource book for these babies?  I REALLY want the third-grade one; when I requested it from my head co-teacher she told me it doesn't exist . . . but I've seen a picture of it on this thread so I know better!  Ha!  But, seriously, any ideas of bookstores that might carry it?  Kyobo, perhaps? 

Let's keep this thread going, if you've got to work with these this year, post your ideas/thoughts/complaints!


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #48 on: March 08, 2012, 09:30:27 am »
There IS a grade 3 teachers book, I borrowed my co-teachers last year and then forgot to give it back so it became mine.  Your co-teacher should be ordering these with the text books, no?  Anyway I wouldn't bother buying the 3rd grade teachers book-it is utter tripe in my humble opinion.  Does nothing but give you a script in English of what to say and the activity ideas are nothing but listen and repeat.

Anyway, not to rub it in, but my school realised the error of their ways with these books, we got new ones, which are simpler as there is barely any dialogue to remember, and its practical too.  Although still not perfect, this is the easiest book I have ever had to teach!  And the teachers book has the language objectives for each chapter in English.  So I gracefully bow out of this thread!  Good luck to the rest of you =D


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #49 on: March 12, 2012, 02:42:45 pm »
I'm going to start uploading some of my stuff from last year. I teach the "Talk Together" sections. This is grade 2 chapters 10-12. Apologies for the quality of these powerpoints. I was and still am completely stumped by these pieces of trash they call "textbooks."

These are powerpoints I used to introduce and drill dialogue with the students. I basically just asked student volunteers to stand up and say the dialogue to each other for points. I usually made an activity or two to be done after drilling the dialogues. I may upload those later.


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #50 on: March 12, 2012, 02:55:05 pm »
Grade 3 talk together powerpoints, chapters 10-12. Same boring stuff, maybe you'll find some of it useful. I had to burn through chapter 11 quickly so I ended up skipping a lot of the stuff I planned for the powerpoint. Same goes for chapter 12.


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #51 on: March 12, 2012, 03:27:44 pm »
Grade 1 Talk Together chapters 10-12


  • olololox
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    • February 20, 2011, 05:14:29 pm
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Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #52 on: March 15, 2012, 10:05:39 am »
I have to use this book this year for Grade 1. I'll be posting my materials and ideas I have, but I have to say - the textbook sucks. I taught 1st graders the first lesson and am now looking into the second. I have no idea how to jump from 'hi. my name is _____' to 'i can't swim'.  :-\


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #53 on: March 19, 2012, 12:24:38 pm »
I have to use this book this year for Grade 1. I'll be posting my materials and ideas I have, but I have to say - the textbook sucks. I taught 1st graders the first lesson and am now looking into the second. I have no idea how to jump from 'hi. my name is _____' to 'i can't swim'.  :-\

Welcome to the club. I'm seriously considering setting one of these books on fire when I finish this year. I actually consider having these textbooks to be worse than having no textbooks at all. It is so friggin time consuming to figure out how the hell to teach from them and no matter what I do my lessons end up being average at best.  Harumph!

Sometimes I like to imagine the kind of lessons I could teach if I had one of those nice textbooks I see being sold at TESOL conferences. One can dream...


  • hyeonbuk
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Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #54 on: April 09, 2012, 02:19:41 pm »
I did this activity with all grades but it is more so from the 2nd grade text book on activities and what you want to or like to do. I showed a powerpoint as students took notes on the spellings and learnt the difference between plural and singular by adding a 's' at the end or not. Then for the younger grade I played hangman and the older we did a survey on what activities people like or not and how often because they are learning that in their books.


  • blessed10
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Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #55 on: April 28, 2012, 06:01:32 am »
when were these books published?


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #56 on: May 02, 2012, 10:54:08 am »
when were these books published?

Grade 1: 2008
Grade 2: 2009
Grade 3: 2010

At least according to my books. I think rather than looking at the date they were published, it is more fruitful to take a look at the authors themselves. There are about 10 Korean authors, a couple of which apparently spent a little bit of time at foreign universities. Grade 2 and 3 textbooks include "Sharp William Edward" and Grade 1 includes "Peter S. Sylvestre." I assume both of these waygookin "authors" were paid money to do no more than skim through the books and check for glaring grammar mistakes. If they actually had a part in creating the content or the language they should be ashamed of themselves.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2012, 10:57:04 am by actualstarfish »


  • English Rose
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Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #57 on: May 04, 2012, 01:32:15 pm »
Wow, I finally found this!

My school does something a little different. I have to teach the listening section of the textbook as well as topics around it. So, although I teach the sometimes irrelevant listening section I like to have the students learn about other topics related to the book.

For chapter one listening and talking I chose to speak about family. This is something they know part of but struggle to actually talk about. I was shocked by how little they knew and how much they gained from this lesson. It's very loosely based on the textbook...


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #58 on: May 09, 2012, 02:18:55 pm »
I'm gonna post some random activities starting with grade 2. Again, I teach "Talk Together" only so this may not apply to all of you. Some of the files were created using Open Office so you may need to download that to open them.

Attached Files:

-Grade 2 Lesson 1 Dialogue Halves
-Grade 2 Lesson 2 Running Dictation Game, Lower Levels
-Grade 2 Lesson 3 Yu Gi Oh Bomb Game (Speaking practice only)
-Grade 2 Lesson 4 Speed Game
-Grade 2 Lesson 5 Trashball Game

Here are some directions:

For Dialogue Halves, each student is given half a dialogue. They must memorize the dialogue, then put it away. They will stand up and say their half dialogues to every other student in class until they find a match. When they find a match, they sit down together. After all the students found their matches I had different pairs speak their dialogues out loud for the class. You need to make sure each student has one half dialogue and that there is a match for every student. Use less dialogues and make more copies of the same to make the activity easier for lower level classes. Also, make sure they memorize the dialogues and aren't reading from them while walking around or just showing them to their classmates. This worked fairly well for my higher level classes.

Running dictation is a pretty popular game so I shouldn't need to explain the rules. After the groups had finished writing the sentences, I had them use their sentences to fill in the blanks of the dialogue and then read it out loud together.

The Yu Gi Oh bomb game is for speaking practice only. They don't need to think up the answers. You might want to change it based on your student levels. I was stumped with that lesson so all I could think of was to have them parrot the sentences out loud. They got really into the game though.

The speed game is relatively easy and it works for all levels. It is based on a popular game called the SLAM game so some of you may know it already. You need to print out and post the papers around your classroom in a U-shape. Split the class in two. Each team stands at one end of the U. The first person in each team must walk around the U, saying each sentence out loud. When they meet, they play rock paper scissors together. The winner can continue going and the loser must go to the back of the line of his/her team, then the first person in that team will start at the beginning of the U. To win the game one student must defeat all of his/her opponents and make it to the other side. This game doesn't require too much from the students and explaining the rules may be more difficult without a Korean co teacher to translate but every single class had a lot of fun with it.

Trashball is another sort-of popular game from waygook. It's very simple. Answer questions like a bomb game and if they are correct they get to shoot paper balls into a trash can for points. This was a popular one too. I make sure to increase the difficulty level after each round and sometimes I award style points but not usually.

I hope some of this is helpful for you. Feel free to modify it for your classes. I've reached the point where I'm not stressing out much over how much they are learning from the textbooks and I'm just trying to get the kids to have as much fun as they can.


Re: Middle School Books (Jumping Kids)
« Reply #59 on: May 09, 2012, 02:36:47 pm »
Grade 3 Talk Together Activities Below:

-Grade 3 Lesson 2 Dialogue Halves
-Grade 3 Lesson 3 Yugioh Bomb Game (Speaking Practice Only)
-Grade 3 Lesson 4 Running Dictation
-Grade 3 Lesson 5 Trashball

Directions for these activities are explained in my previous post.

I do have high level versions of some of these activities but since I work in a wealthy area my high level students' English level is probably far above the average and not of use to most of you.