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  • rockiavelli
  • Veteran

    • 166

    • August 29, 2011, 09:24:35 am
    • Tongyeong, Gyeongsangnamdo, ROK
Re: Problem with One Korean Conversation Teacher in my School
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2013, 11:24:10 am »
Why do so many people here feel the need to pick apart posts and go on troll hunts instead of just answering the question...or just ignoring it?
It's odd for a site that's purpose is to help other teachers out.
Maybe the OP had an off day, maybe she was born and raised in Korea for a while before coming to the states, who knows what her story is.
The last thing people asking for assistance need is people picking apart their English and trying to uncover their "true" origins.

  Unless the person is obviously trolling, I dont get why people are so quick to pull out their Sherlock hats and magnifying glasses.  I know this is the 'internetz', but, jfc, people. 
If the person has a somewhat valid question, give em an answer...Even if the person seems somewhat 'dodgy', I'm sure that somebody on this site could find the information useful.

When I first joined this website, I wondered the exact same thing. I think people get built up frustrations throughout the day and then just let loose on people. I'm on 6 teacher forums. This one and Dave's ESL cafe are by far the most negative ones. I stopped getting upset at people here for their rudeness, but I blame the actual country. The country turns people into bitter trolls.

Really?  Where else are you posting?

This board is pollyanna-ish by netforum standards.  If Dave's is ESL hell, then this is ESL heaven, and the mods here are generally pretty jackbooted about enforcing that positivity and light.  (Wait, does that count as a religious reference?  They're outlawed here.)

I chalk it up to the massive influx of young (to me), straight out of college types that got sucked into Korea when the public school market massively expanded in 2009/2010.  You poor kids were raised in a world where everyone gets a good job sticker, even if they're a moron and don't deserve it.  You were raised in a world where PC was a given, not a horrible result of the autocratic side of liberalism.

However, the person that posted it is either horribly unqualified to be a GET, as they can't write without sounding like a non-native speaker, or a non-native speaker.  (The EPIK rules, I think this is still the case, allow gyopos to come to Korea even if they only did a bit of high school in the west and went to uni in west.  So this person might be a non-native speaker who has the same job as us 'regular' GETs.  Maybe her, claire?,  family immigrated?)  I'd agree that it's rude to tell someone their English sucks, but it doesn't make it wrong or out of line on a board that exists to service primarily the public school GET crowd.

Now, to be helpful...

If you're a gyopo as you said, you're probably screwed.  If you let the teachers at your school know that you knew anything about Korean culture they're probably going to expect you to know ALL of Korean culture simply by merit of you genes and the fact that you're written down in a bone book somewhere.  You're really going to have to 'eat some face' and go to the head English teacher and explain the situation and hope that person is sympathetic.  If you have a better relationship with one of the other K teachers that might be the person to talk to about it.  I'm sorry that you have to deal with this, but Korean culture is a matterhorn swirling with winged monkeys just waiting to chuck us all off and no amount of quality crampons are going to save any of us in the long run.


  • iseya
  • Expert Waygook

    • 704

    • February 15, 2012, 06:14:49 pm
    • USA
Re: Problem with One Korean Conversation Teacher in my School
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2013, 12:14:51 pm »
However, the person that posted it is either horribly unqualified to be a GET, as they can't write without sounding like a non-native speaker, or a non-native speaker.  (The EPIK rules, I think this is still the case, allow gyopos to come to Korea even if they only did a bit of high school in the west and went to uni in west.  So this person might be a non-native speaker who has the same job as us 'regular' GETs.  Maybe her, claire?,  family immigrated?)  I'd agree that it's rude to tell someone their English sucks, but it doesn't make it wrong or out of line on a board that exists to service primarily the public school GET crowd.

Now, to be helpful...

If you're a gyopo as you said, you're probably screwed.  If you let the teachers at your school know that you knew anything about Korean culture they're probably going to expect you to know ALL of Korean culture simply by merit of you genes and the fact that you're written down in a bone book somewhere.  You're really going to have to 'eat some face' and go to the head English teacher and explain the situation and hope that person is sympathetic.  If you have a better relationship with one of the other K teachers that might be the person to talk to about it.  I'm sorry that you have to deal with this, but Korean culture is a matterhorn swirling with winged monkeys just waiting to chuck us all off and no amount of quality crampons are going to save any of us in the long run.

...

Horribly unqualified to be a GET in Korea???  South Korea??? Land of the Kimchi Korea? We talking about the same Korea?
What wonder school are you working at?
The vast majority of us don't need to know anything about English beyond speaking it to do this job.
 97.5678% of us aren't teaching the finer points of grammar and syntax.
 A good deal of us communicate a lot more through hand gestures, pictures, ppts, coteachers, and the few 'smart' students in the class than our words. 
The students and her coteachers won't be able to tell the difference between her English and that of a 'native'.

People are calling out her English because theyre being dicks.  It serves no other purpose. 
If we were all working in universities, or in proper class situations, then yeah, it'd be a bit more appropriate to draw attention to errors, but that clearly aint the case in the esl world of Korea.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2013, 12:18:24 pm by iseya »


Re: Problem with One Korean Conversation Teacher in my School
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2013, 02:40:16 pm »
However, the person that posted it is either horribly unqualified to be a GET, as they can't write without sounding like a non-native speaker, or a non-native speaker.  (The EPIK rules, I think this is still the case, allow gyopos to come to Korea even if they only did a bit of high school in the west and went to uni in west.  So this person might be a non-native speaker who has the same job as us 'regular' GETs.  Maybe her, claire?,  family immigrated?)  I'd agree that it's rude to tell someone their English sucks, but it doesn't make it wrong or out of line on a board that exists to service primarily the public school GET crowd.

Now, to be helpful...

If you're a gyopo as you said, you're probably screwed.  If you let the teachers at your school know that you knew anything about Korean culture they're probably going to expect you to know ALL of Korean culture simply by merit of you genes and the fact that you're written down in a bone book somewhere.  You're really going to have to 'eat some face' and go to the head English teacher and explain the situation and hope that person is sympathetic.  If you have a better relationship with one of the other K teachers that might be the person to talk to about it.  I'm sorry that you have to deal with this, but Korean culture is a matterhorn swirling with winged monkeys just waiting to chuck us all off and no amount of quality crampons are going to save any of us in the long run.

...

Horribly unqualified to be a GET in Korea???  South Korea??? Land of the Kimchi Korea? We talking about the same Korea?
What wonder school are you working at?
The vast majority of us don't need to know anything about English beyond speaking it to do this job.
 97.5678% of us aren't teaching the finer points of grammar and syntax.
 A good deal of us communicate a lot more through hand gestures, pictures, ppts, coteachers, and the few 'smart' students in the class than our words. 
The students and her coteachers won't be able to tell the difference between her English and that of a 'native'.

People are calling out her English because theyre being dicks.  It serves no other purpose. 
If we were all working in universities, or in proper class situations, then yeah, it'd be a bit more appropriate to draw attention to errors, but that clearly aint the case in the esl world of Korea.

We are hired because we are native speakers.  That's the point.  For most of us, teaching the finer points of grammar isn't a part of our jobs because the kids aren't ready for it and that is something Korean English teachers can cover just as well as a native teacher.  The whole reason we are here is because we don't drop off our 'a' on accident and we know where each pesky little 'the' goes.  We are here to teach proper pronunciation and culture.  Are our skills wasted in many schools?  Yes.  I feel much more useful teaching 5th and 6th grade where my students understand at least a little bit of what I'm saying.  Teaching 3rd and 4th?  Generally a waste of time other than to stress the difference in pronunciation between L and R.  But we have no control over that. 

So based on OP's original post alone (because that's all we have) then I kind of have to agree that they don't sound qualified to teach as a native speaker.  A Korean teacher, maybe, but they definitely do not write at a level that signifies a grasp of the 'finer points' of the English language.  I don't know or care about OP's life but these schools pay us because we are native speakers.  There is no point in shipping someone all the way from Canada/US/SA/UK if their English isn't even as good as the KET they already have in the schools. 


  • rockiavelli
  • Veteran

    • 166

    • August 29, 2011, 09:24:35 am
    • Tongyeong, Gyeongsangnamdo, ROK
Re: Problem with One Korean Conversation Teacher in my School
« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2013, 02:43:01 pm »
She's posting on a board to help GETs full of GETs.  She's going to get shit if her English isn't very good. 

I'm not saying you can't teach little Minsu that 사자 means lion, or even the basic grammar stuff that I do because it's in my textbook.  She surely can.  That wasn't the point.  The point was that it's silly to moan about calling someone out for odd/bad grammar and usage of a ESL teacher's board.  At grade 5 MOST elementary students haven't been taught what nouns and verbs are in KOREAN, so the grammar lessons have to be limited.

Also, they're not so active anymore, but I lived through the days of the Anti-English Spectrum/English Cafe on Naver that was 'spying' on NETs and trying to get them fired or deported.  Some of us are pretty leery about posts on 'our' boards that might be Koreans trolling.

And you're wrong about unis.  Most unis that use NETs are dodgy.  Most NETs I know that work at uni teach Freshman Conversational English.  It's probably at the level of a sixth grade lesson on average, though that depends on the quality of the school.


  • KLM
  • Veteran

    • 161

    • May 19, 2011, 10:24:36 am
    • South Korea
Re: Problem with One Korean Conversation Teacher in my School
« Reply #24 on: April 02, 2013, 03:05:42 pm »
We have seen this scenario before: A nonnative English speaker makes a post in which he or she claims to be a native English speaker. Other posters see through the charade. The original poster never comments again.

I wish the OP would let us know what he/she was hoping to achieve through this exercise.


  • kiwityke
  • Super Waygook

    • 335

    • October 20, 2011, 07:51:05 am
    • Gimpo, South Korea
Re: Problem with One Korean Conversation Teacher in my School
« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2013, 03:14:56 pm »
Okay I smelled a troll as she stated in her first post 'she knows I know a little Korean language' - now she claims to be a Gyopo writes English like a native Korean speaker, yet claims to speak very little or a little Korean...

Makes no sense they certainly don't speak native English, claim not to speak native Korean yet they are a Gyopo so what the hell do they speak?

Hence I called them out on it.

It was a perfect setup for the 'I hate Koreans brigade' to jump all over.

Just my opinion. If the person seems genuine, even if they are Korean or Swahili for all I care I will give advice, if they look like they are trolling I will call it.


  • rockiavelli
  • Veteran

    • 166

    • August 29, 2011, 09:24:35 am
    • Tongyeong, Gyeongsangnamdo, ROK
Re: Problem with One Korean Conversation Teacher in my School
« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2013, 12:18:02 pm »
Was it really a 'I hate Koreans' pile-on?