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  • ladysearah
  • Adventurer

    • 47

    • September 02, 2012, 01:33:21 am
    • Tongjin-eup, Masong-ri, Gimpo-si
I am not planning on re-signing my after school class contract (I signed a separate contract for the after school classes because they aren't part of the 22 hours in my GEPIK contract). I have many concerns about the classes I teach (a big one is that although they are technically supposed to be helping me every class, the Korean after school care teachers drop the kids off and then run off to do "paperwork").

I have brought these concerns up to my current co-teacher several times. She's lovely, but after discussing (that's what she told me, anyway) my situation with the head teacher in charge of the after school program, she told me that he said that he will have to let the new head teacher know, since he won't be the head teacher next semester. And my co-teacher is changing, as well.

There's more to it than that, but basically I think it's one of those things where no one wants to take on the responsibility of telling the VP and principal about the situation. I even made a point of offering to do the classes IF there was a guarantee the Korean teachers would come to every class. No one got back to me on that.

These classes (more like babysitting - the kids are all animals and don't sit still long enough to learn anything) leave me stressed out and cranky, and even though they're labeled as "English classes" I teach them nothing. The quiet kids colour, the noisy ones run around and punch each other, and generally I throw a movie to keep everyone else occupied. There are not enough adorable, good kids to keep me wanting to hang out with this bunch.

Anyone else ever been in a similar situation? Like I said, these classes are not part of my GEPIK contract mandated 22 hours, they're extra... I've been told that the VP and principal would "very much like me to keep doing them", but the whole staff is afraid of them anyway, so whatever.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2013, 11:46:54 am by ladysearah »


  • Suza
  • Super Waygook

    • 464

    • March 21, 2011, 07:32:17 am
    • Sanbon
Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2013, 11:15:33 am »
I had a similar case with grade 1 students. I was teaching an after class twice a week for an hour.

The kids were monsters, seriously disruptive. They would not do anything. I was also left alone with no Korean supervision at all.

I coped with it for about 7 months. In the end, I told my coteacher I refused to do it anymore, as I thought it a waste of my time and the schools money.
I offered to teach an advanced class instead. There was no call for it as most students go to hagwons.

My coteacher, VP and P were all fine with it.


  • VizionMC
  • Veteran

    • 205

    • April 05, 2011, 12:21:52 pm
    • Gwangju, South Korea
Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2013, 11:19:41 am »
I'm solidly behind you, and having done these type of classes for 2 years, I recommend just having fun, and lower any expectations of teaching much English. 


Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2013, 12:13:43 pm »
I feel for you OP.  I teach an extra class of 4th grade students but thankfully I have a completely opposite experience.  I really enjoy their class and it is a nice change for me to be chill with the kids and talk to them without my co t getting in the way.  I personally find the lack of a co teacher to be refreshing but I can see how having a rowdy class could mean the opposite. 

Can you discipline them?  Kick them out of the room, speak with their head teacher, send a note home with them or have a Korean teacher call a parent?  Usually simply the threat of such things (to the student or you co teachers) is enough.  Either because the student doesn't want to get in trouble or your Korean teachers don't want to deal with parents so they handle the students themselves. 

It isn't part of your contract so you don't have to teach the course.  You school wants you to because parents like their kids having extra time with the NET and school programs cost a fraction of what a hagwon does.  If you don't want to teach the class then don't.  Your school might try to guilt trip you about it but that's about it.  You don't have to teach it and they can't make you.   


  • Jrong
  • The Legend

    • 2381

    • April 28, 2011, 12:52:32 pm
    more
Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2013, 12:59:49 pm »
I teach AS full-time at a Public School. It's through a privately contracted co. Probably bc P wants that golden handshake.

It's a jungle. Discipline is possible but you need the help of a CoT in that situation, not to be with you in class but for problem children to be sent to. It really can help straighten them out to be sent to CoT.

Just don't do it and force them to contract through a private co. That means more jobs out there for more NETS.
"When in doubt...ask Troglodyte" ~0mnslnd


  • chuck2657
  • Expert Waygook

    • 677

    • September 11, 2012, 02:29:12 pm
Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2013, 01:14:28 pm »
I feel for you.  There's a huge difference between when the co-teacher sits in the back of the room for 5-10 minutes, and when they don't show up at all.  If it's a terrible class of kids...there's honestly not much you can do.  Keep trying and try to get the basic rules down...they're never going to behave, but hopefully you can get them to behave enough so some of the class can learn.  The 6th graders who don't know the alphabet aren't going to get much out of the class anyways...


  • gamgokt
  • Veteran

    • 118

    • February 18, 2013, 09:49:58 am
    • here and there
Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2013, 07:34:54 am »
Quote
I am not planning on re-signing my after school class contract (I signed a separate contract for the after school classes because they aren't part of the 22 hours in my GEPIK contract).


This piques my curiosity as I have never heard of anyone having to sign 2 contracts. GEPIK does provide for after school classes, it is called overtime and lays out what you should be paid for classes over and above the 22 hours of regular time.

So how did they convince you to sign a second contract? I am not even sure you can have two seperate contracts even at the same school.

As for the rest, I have thoughts but they are best kept to myself.


  • lotte world
  • The Legend

    • 2272

    • August 22, 2011, 09:00:38 pm
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Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2013, 08:07:39 am »

As for the rest, I have thoughts but they are best kept to myself.

Good idea.


  • gamgokt
  • Veteran

    • 118

    • February 18, 2013, 09:49:58 am
    • here and there
Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2013, 09:15:50 am »

As for the rest, I have thoughts but they are best kept to myself.

Good idea.

I would have preferred an explanation for my curiosity instead


  • fishead
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1138

    • April 23, 2010, 07:58:05 am
    • Yangju Korea
Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2013, 10:18:23 am »
 Get a copy of the Chusak book role book arrange to get photos of each and every student in the class. Whenever a student goofs off aim a smart phone at him her and start video taping make corresponding notes next to the photo of her her contact his home room teacher and show the video of him her goofing off from your smart phone.


  • ladysearah
  • Adventurer

    • 47

    • September 02, 2012, 01:33:21 am
    • Tongjin-eup, Masong-ri, Gimpo-si
Re: Just looking for some solidarity, more than advice
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2013, 11:46:11 am »
Quote
I am not planning on re-signing my after school class contract (I signed a separate contract for the after school classes because they aren't part of the 22 hours in my GEPIK contract).


This piques my curiosity as I have never heard of anyone having to sign 2 contracts. GEPIK does provide for after school classes, it is called overtime and lays out what you should be paid for classes over and above the 22 hours of regular time.

So how did they convince you to sign a second contract? I am not even sure you can have two seperate contracts even at the same school.

As for the rest, I have thoughts but they are best kept to myself.

What happened was this: During my first week in Korea, when I was still jet-lagged out of my skull, this contract that I couldn't read (completely in Korean) was brought to me by my co-teacher and the head teacher. I didn't know any better, and was exhausted, so I signed the thing.

I do think it's with a different company though... or else it's just a weird system. I get paid separately for the after school classes, at the end of the month, rather than on the 17th.

Okay, now I'm asking for advice. How do I make sure I can get out of this? My contract is actually up at the end of February (so only a week to go), so these shenanigans need to be figured out soon...

The only article that I've found that might help is Article 7.3:
"Upon mutual agreement, the Employer may require the Employee to perform duties overtime other than teaching classes in addition to normal work days and work hours. In this case, supplementary overtime pay will be provided in accordance to article 56 in the Gyeonggi Provincial Office of Education's "School Employee Employment Regulations.""


  • Suza
  • Super Waygook

    • 464

    • March 21, 2011, 07:32:17 am
    • Sanbon
Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2013, 11:58:31 am »
I'm under a contract from Gunpo city rather than with GEPIK or EPIK.

But, in my contract it states that I am an assistant. I know with other contracts we are not meant to be left alone. In my previous school under the GEPIK contract this was outlined.

Can you not state this when your contract is up for review? Maybe, state that you are willing to continue with these classes if a Korean teacher is present during classes and helping with discipline.


  • gamgokt
  • Veteran

    • 118

    • February 18, 2013, 09:49:58 am
    • here and there
Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2013, 01:09:37 pm »
Quote
Okay, now I'm asking for advice. How do I make sure I can get out of this? My contract is actually up at the end of February (so only a week to go), so these shenanigans need to be figured out soon...

The school should not have had you sign a second contract, there was no need for it

{Changed my mind}
« Last Edit: February 22, 2013, 02:20:33 pm by gamgokt »


  • gamgokt
  • Veteran

    • 118

    • February 18, 2013, 09:49:58 am
    • here and there
Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2013, 01:20:32 pm »
Quote
How do I make sure I can get out of this? My contract is actually up at the end of February (so only a week to go), so these shenanigans need to be figured out soon...

{changed my mind} No need to get out of it unless it was a contract for a different company BUT again, you didn't need a second contract for after school work if it was the school you were working for.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2013, 02:22:28 pm by gamgokt »


  • lotte world
  • The Legend

    • 2272

    • August 22, 2011, 09:00:38 pm
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Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2013, 01:30:15 pm »
I don't understand the situation entirely.  You have two contracts (regular E2 GEPIK, and some after-school thing), and one of them is expiring at the end of February.  Which one?  Or both?  Are you re-signing with GEPIK?  Are you staying with the same school?

If you don't want to do the after-school contract any more, and the current after-school contract is expiring, then don't sign a new one.  Why isn't it as simple as that?


  • glb0b
  • Expert Waygook

    • 601

    • July 06, 2010, 03:02:56 pm
Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2013, 01:38:42 pm »
I don't think signing a second contract is that unusual for after school classes. I signed one for my kindergarten classes last year. It was still with my school, not a different company. It was all in Korean but I didn't sign it without checking what it said first :).

Basically the contract was just for x number of classes per week from a date to b date at a pay rate of y won per class.

Last year I taught the same classes but was not asked to sign a separate contract.

Just because you were paid on a different date, doesn't mean the second contract is not with your school. Everyone I know gets paid separately for after school classes.

As long as the dates have expired on the second contract you signed, then it is a completely separate issue from your regular contract.

I suggest that you re-sign your regular contract and refuse to sign another contract about after school classes. Just tell them that you don't want to do the after school classes. The bit of your contract you quoted does say "upon mutual agreement" so you should be able to say no.

Then the biggest issue you might have is that the school treats you badly because they are angry with you for not doing the after school classes.

If you tell them you won't do the after school classes before re-signing your regular contract, there is also the possibility that they will say you can't stay then, but I don't know how likely that is.


Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2013, 02:03:36 pm »
I am in kind of a similar situation as you. My school also asked me to sign a separate contract for after school classes last year, and after some negotiating, I THOUGHT they understood when I explicitly said I wouldn't do the class if a Korean teacher wasn't present and if there weren't at least enough students so that I would get 20,000 per class like my GEPIK contract says (the students' parents pay a certain amount each month so the money comes from them). They agreed to let me split the payments with my co-teacher and we each did about half the work. When the second semester started, I realized we had less than the right amount and I was getting paid about 18,000 per class instead of 20,000. The extra 2,000 doesn't seem like a big deal but we had to do the class for the next six months, even during vacation, so it adds up to over 100,000 that they owe me. When I brought it up to my co-teacher she completely flipped out and yelled at me in front of an entire class of sixth graders, saying I had agreed to take whatever pay according to how many kids were in the class. I let it go since I realized it was a misunderstanding, and it was pretty much my fault that I didn't ask them to add my conditions in the contract. I don't know how she could have possibly misunderstood me, but somehow she did. Or she just forgot what we agreed since it wasn't in the contract. The other thing that pissed me off was that the contract expired in August and they still forced me to continue the class for six months. Complete BS.

They haven't yet said anything about doing the after school class this coming school year. I have avoided even asking about it because it's a sore subject, but my co-teacher knows I regret ever agreeing to it in the first place. If they spring it on me at the last second and say I "must" do it, I will refuse. I feel like a coward for not just asking about it, but I just don't want to deal with it. Nervous about how they'll react.  :sad:

Sorry, I probably didn't help much with your problem, but I definitely can empathize with you! Solidarity!


  • ladysearah
  • Adventurer

    • 47

    • September 02, 2012, 01:33:21 am
    • Tongjin-eup, Masong-ri, Gimpo-si
Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2013, 02:28:33 pm »
I don't understand the situation entirely.  You have two contracts (regular E2 GEPIK, and some after-school thing), and one of them is expiring at the end of February.  Which one?  Or both?  Are you re-signing with GEPIK?  Are you staying with the same school?

If you don't want to do the after-school contract any more, and the current after-school contract is expiring, then don't sign a new one.  Why isn't it as simple as that?


My after school contract is expiring, not my GEPIK contract. Sooo I am a bit nervous of being attacked by my "betters" over the next six months for not doing the classes... I guess we'll find have to wait and see...


  • gamgokt
  • Veteran

    • 118

    • February 18, 2013, 09:49:58 am
    • here and there
Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2013, 02:30:49 pm »
You are not obligated to do extra classes. If they want you to do them just point to the clauses in the regular contract that talk about overtime pay. You do not need a second contract to teach them.

My concern would be about taxes and other deductions on that second contract.


  • lotte world
  • The Legend

    • 2272

    • August 22, 2011, 09:00:38 pm
    more
Re: Looking mostly for some solidarity, but advice would be nice, too!
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2013, 02:37:47 pm »
I don't understand the situation entirely.  You have two contracts (regular E2 GEPIK, and some after-school thing), and one of them is expiring at the end of February.  Which one?  Or both?  Are you re-signing with GEPIK?  Are you staying with the same school?

If you don't want to do the after-school contract any more, and the current after-school contract is expiring, then don't sign a new one.  Why isn't it as simple as that?


My after school contract is expiring, not my GEPIK contract. Sooo I am a bit nervous of being attacked by my "betters" over the next six months for not doing the classes... I guess we'll find have to wait and see...

Ok, so it is as simple as that.

Don't sign.

Expect the evil eye.

Be strong.

?

Profit!*


* Profit here is counted in free time and less stress, not cash.