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  • Bluesoju
  • Adventurer

    • 30

    • November 13, 2010, 06:26:15 pm
    • Seoul
Question to Brits about sports
« on: January 03, 2013, 12:36:47 am »
When Americans cheer for sports teams, we use phrases like:
-Go Cowboys!
-Let's go Lakers!
-Come on Dodgers! (during a game)

But I have a feeling no Brit says things like "Go Manchester!"

So what phrases do you guys use when cheering for your sports teams then, especially in 'football'?






  • taeyang
  • Moderator - LVL 4

    • 5507

    • September 08, 2010, 08:35:10 am
    • daejeon
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2013, 07:13:51 am »
"come on you blues!" ?

there are lots of football songs and chants too, but i don't pretend to know them sadly.
use google to search the site

site:waygook.org XXXX

replace 'XXXX' with your search term


Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2013, 07:50:45 am »
Each team will have its own selection of songs

'Let's go XYZ' is the most cringeworthy thing you could ever say at a football match. Football songs are more like hymns compared to the cheerleading type chants in NFL for example.

Youtube 'You'll never walk alone' for Liverpool or 'Forever blowing bubbles' for West Ham

These two are two of the more traditional songs.


  • Vinnie
  • Veteran

    • 151

    • July 28, 2010, 01:17:42 am
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2013, 08:03:50 am »
Each team will have its own selection of songs

'Let's go XYZ' is the most cringeworthy thing you could ever say at a football match. Football songs are more like hymns compared to the cheerleading type chants in NFL for example.

Youtube 'You'll never walk alone' for Liverpool or 'Forever blowing bubbles' for West Ham

These two are two of the more traditional songs.

Indeed! The nearest you'd get to these chants is sometimes when you hear Liverpool fans shouting in the pub, "C'mon the Pool" whilst watching a liverpool match. Or Chelsea fans at a game continously singing; "Chelsea, Chelsea, Chelsea, Chelsea...". That's about the height of it though and as you pointed out most teams and their fans have their own songs rather that chants per se. Liverpools and West Ham's being good examples of this.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2013, 08:34:21 am by Vinnie »


  • Bluesoju
  • Adventurer

    • 30

    • November 13, 2010, 06:26:15 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2013, 08:11:42 am »
How about when cheering in another sport, for example an Olympic athlete?


  • Suza
  • Super Waygook

    • 464

    • March 21, 2011, 07:32:17 am
    • Sanbon
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2013, 08:47:43 am »
The football chants change so regulary. Some are aimed at the opposing team, some are aimed at a player on their own side.

For the most part they're funny and either insulting or full pf praise.

Manchester United and Liverpool tend to have really funny ones. Google search 'football chants' or 'terrace chants' and you'll get an idea.

As for other sports, it all depends on the region. I guess for the most part the persons name is called.
A lot depends on the region in the UK; Liverpool, London, Manchester, Newcastle, Birmingham etc. It's not so generic as America or Canada.


Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2013, 10:45:44 am »
Chants at football matches in Britain is probably something that only people from other countries, where football is deeply embedded in the culture (and particularly the working class culture) of the country, can completely get their head around.

The funnier chants tend to be extremely cruel and cross well beyond some people's (and occasionally many people's) threshold of decency. Opposing players who'd either been caught playing away, or whose wife had, are one of the more frequent targets. Man Utd fans have a chant for their player, Ryan Giggs, to the tune of the old Robin Hood & his merry men theme

Ryan Giggs, Ryan Giggs, running down the wing,
Ryan Giggs, Ryan Giggs, running down the wing -
Feared by the blues, Love by the reds...
Ryan Giggs, Ryan Giggs, Ryan Giggs...


However, in the light of Giggs, married with 2 kids with a bit of a Mr Clean image, apparently having an affair with Welsh celebrity, Imogen Thomas, which he tried to get a court injunction to stop reporting of, but which spread anyway on Twitter and elsewhere on the internet, the above got corrupted by other teams' fans to

Ryan Giggs, Ryan Giggs, shagging Imogen,
Ryan Giggs, Ryan Giggs, shagging Imogen-
He takes her up the sh***er, and now it's all on Twitter...
Ryan Giggs, Ryan Giggs, Ryan Giggs...


A common chant everywhere is "Stand up if you hate (insert other team or occasionally opposing player)" and everyone stands up, obviously.

I recall one occasion when my team, Middlesbrough, were playing Liverpool who had a player, Nick Barmby, who had previously played for Middlesbrough but had left amid rumours of his wife having had extra coaching from the then assistant team manager. As Barmby walked across the pitch to take a corner kick, the end behind that goal chanted "Stand up if you've had his wife" with several thousand people standing up to chant this.

If you find this all highly offensive, then bear in mind that in Britain the above is largely (although not universally) still considered to be within the realm of acceptable "banter". I have the impression it would have crossed many acceptability lines in other countries.

But things have got much, much milder in the last 10-20 years or so in the UK. It's no longer considered acceptable to chant about the Munich air disaster when your team is playing against Man Utd. Likewise with other similar sick chants about death and suffering of innocent people. And there aren't so many chants about fighting and violence any more. That used to be the case as football used to be a game followed in considerable numbers by working class males, many of whom saw the day of the match as a chance to aggressively defend their territory against visitors from the other team's city, or as a chance to infiltrate and "take" the other team's territory if it was an away game.

So it always used to be the case that whenever an away team took the lead and its fans cheered to celebrate the goal, the home fans would break into a response chant of "You're gonna get your f'ckin heads kicked in" or altenatively to the same tune "You're going home in a f'ckin ambulance".

Many teams' fans had a chant to the tune of "I'm only a poor little sparrow" (a 70s hit by The Ramblers) of "he's only a poor little (cockney/scouser/brummie etc), his face is all tattered and torn; he made me feel sick, so I hit him with a brick, and now he don't sing any more." For Newcastle fans, when they played West Ham, the last line was changed to "he's not fit for a fight, it might set him alight, and now he don't sing any more" due to an incident at a Newcastle v West Ham game where someone had thrown a makeshift petrol bomb into the West Ham fans' enclosure, which had set fire to the trousers of one of the West Ham fans. (Fortunately, he wasn't seriously injured IIRC).

So things are much tamer nowadays and many people complain about the lack of atmosphere in the present day all seater stadia, where people from the, ugh, crappy end of town now tend to be priced out of the stadium. But those complainers often candy coat their nostalgia of what it used to be like.

« Last Edit: January 03, 2013, 10:49:16 am by ironopolis »


Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2013, 11:00:55 am »
How about when cheering in another sport, for example an Olympic athlete?

BTW, OP, I sense that perhaps you're a little disappointed (or maybe that's too strong a word) to only get answers about football so far. But that's simply because no other sport comes close to football for how deeply embedded it is into the life of the nation, for want of a better way of putting that. Football is probably more popular than even the next 5 sports all put together.

You do hear chants and cheering associated with other sports, but, TBH, a lot of it is just copied from stuff used previously at football matches.


Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2013, 11:37:19 am »
Thanks to Irish folks, I now yell "GO ON!/ GO ON [noun]!" Not Brits, but still.


Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2013, 03:33:02 pm »
THERE'S ONLY ONEEEEEEEE RICKY HATTON!!!
ONEEEEEEEE RICKY HATTON!!
WALKING ALONG
SINGING A SONG
WALKING IN A HATTON WONDERLAND


  • Bluesoju
  • Adventurer

    • 30

    • November 13, 2010, 06:26:15 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2013, 09:21:35 pm »
Thanks for everyone's replies so far, especially ironopolis' long and insightful post.

I was curious because on facebook, I always see Americans cheering their sports teams on, but the few British friends I haven't seen them posting anything before a game is about to start.

What would you Brits post in that type of situation? The only thing I saw once was something saying:  "Glory glory man united" (after a victory?)


Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2013, 11:31:18 pm »
Thanks for everyone's replies so far, especially ironopolis' long and insightful post.

I was curious because on facebook, I always see Americans cheering their sports teams on, but the few British friends I haven't seen them posting anything before a game is about to start.

What would you Brits post in that type of situation? The only thing I saw once was something saying:  "Glory glory man united" (after a victory?)

That must be just your particular crowd. I am informed everytime Arsenal, Man U, and various county teams even sneeze.


  • Bluesoju
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    • 30

    • November 13, 2010, 06:26:15 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2013, 11:44:00 pm »
Thanks for everyone's replies so far, especially ironopolis' long and insightful post.

I was curious because on facebook, I always see Americans cheering their sports teams on, but the few British friends I haven't seen them posting anything before a game is about to start.

What would you Brits post in that type of situation? The only thing I saw once was something saying:  "Glory glory man united" (after a victory?)

That must be just your particular crowd. I am informed everytime Arsenal, Man U, and various county teams even sneeze.

Right, don't have a lot of British friends which is why I'm asking here. Any good examples?


  • flasyb
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1901

    • November 30, 2010, 12:10:03 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2013, 05:02:59 am »
Football chants are much more complex. "Go X!!!" would just be really really embarrassingly simple in a football (soccer) match. You'd get a fair few looks of disdain from the crowd around you if you blurted that kind of thing out.

Here's one Manchester United used to sing about their own Park Ji Sung. Basically saying they prefer a "dog eating foreigner", as it were, to someone born just up the road. For the record, Manchester United fans (I'm not one) really loved Park Ji Sung.

This one is sung to the tune of "The Lord of the Dance"

"Park, Park, Where ever you may be
You eat dogs in your home country
But it could be worse
You could be a scouse
Eating rats in your council house"

I also like this one 'pool fans sing about Gerrard. This one is sung to the tune of "Que sera sera"

"Steve Gerrard Gerrard
he can pass
forty yards
hes big and hes
***ing hard
Steve Gerrard Gerrard

Steve Gerrard, Gerrard
he'll pass
the ball 40 yards
he's better
than Frank Lampard
Steve Gerrard,
Gerrard"

[edit] Found a video of Man Utd fans singing about Park Ji Sung. He's just scored to make it 2-1 to Man Utd. Actual song starts at around 50 seconds in.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v06LcWq5-X8
« Last Edit: January 04, 2013, 05:19:55 am by flasyb »
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

We are not "guests" in Korea. Korea didn't invite us over for Pimms in the garden. We are paid employees.


  • Bluesoju
  • Adventurer

    • 30

    • November 13, 2010, 06:26:15 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2013, 03:09:17 pm »
I was trying to do more research on this, and seeing what people on facebook say before a big game. Tried looking on the Man U official facebook page under comments, but a lot of non native English speakers so I couldn't trust those.

Would something like:
"Come on United" work?

Also seen someone say:
"Glory Glory Man United"

Is that something you say after a victory?


Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2013, 03:18:25 pm »
Now I'm just interested in why you're fixated...



  • Swinny
  • Adventurer

    • 58

    • August 29, 2012, 09:32:26 am
    • Chuncheon
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2013, 03:36:05 pm »
The chants are often determined by the number of syllables in your teams name. Then fans just change the team name. For example I like Ironopolis am a Boro (Middlesbrough) supporter. The most heard chants at a Boro game are>

*Tune of You are my sunshine*
You are my Boro
My only Boro
You make me happy
When skies are grey
You'll never notice
How much I love you
Dont ever take my Boro away

This would only work really for two syllable team names, but there are lots of other chants clubs use with this formula.

Another thing you're likely to hear is when a corner is about to be taken
C'mon *team name*
C'mon *team name*


As for other sports, Cricket fans chants are usually centred around a certain individual. A big one at the moment is for an England bowler called Graham Swann.
*To the tune of Love will tear us apart by Joy division*
Swann, Swann will tear you apart again

This is often used by Man united fans for Ryan Giggs as well.



  • Bluesoju
  • Adventurer

    • 30

    • November 13, 2010, 06:26:15 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2013, 05:44:07 pm »
Now I'm just interested in why you're fixated...

Mainly because I'm gathering a list of English expressions for sports and cheering. After asking a friend to ask her British friends, they couldn't really give me a clear answer. So I came on here to ask :D

I'm finished with everything except for this last portion and I wouldn't wanna teach people to use expressions that are unnatural for "football" (soccer).

I see a ton of FB posts from my friends related to sports Americans like, but not many watch the Premiere League so I was just curious how those same types of posts would turn out by Brits who watch "football" (soccer).
« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 05:45:50 pm by Bluesoju »


  • flasyb
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1901

    • November 30, 2010, 12:10:03 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2013, 05:16:21 am »
@bluesoju

Teach a couple of tunes and then have your students write their own songs. They're more likely to want to learn songs they wrote themselves. Football chants in England really are a simple as just changing a few words around or putting a team name into an existing song. Still impressive when everyone is singing though. Much better than "Go Redwings!" (or whatever) in my opinion.
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

We are not "guests" in Korea. Korea didn't invite us over for Pimms in the garden. We are paid employees.


  • rokdav
  • Veteran

    • 81

    • February 23, 2011, 12:27:46 pm
    • Daegu
Re: Question to Brits about sports
« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2013, 10:32:03 am »
If you want something to teach without profanitiers then you can try

'nice one (players first name e.g. Cyril)
nice one son,
Nice one Cyril
let's have another one.

sung after that player has just scored.

can't think of many other 'safe' ones.

if you want simple like 'Go XXX' then maybe 'Up the XXX' like "Up the Blues". Mostly though it depends and changes on the teams nickname. on a sunday you'll just see statuses like "Nice one Blues" or "Yid Army" etc.