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    • August 30, 2011, 08:16:12 am
    • Jecheon
Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2012, 07:45:42 am »
Like people have said it is the economics and the practicality of snow removal/treatment. A lot of cities just don't get enough snow for it to be worth it...but other cities do so I think it just comes down to different priorities.

A lot of people in my city in Chungbuk just don't drive when there is a hint of snow, so maybe the city leaders just think it's not necessary since "no one" drives.

What I don't understand is all this talk about only having summer tires and needing winter tires. What happened to all weather tires? I come from a northern state, basically Canada,  and no one switches their tires, we all just have tires that are good for everything. And we have a summer too!


Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2012, 08:02:05 am »
Fifth winter in Korea, third city,and nothing has changed.No salt or sand.
Whenever I hear about "we have four seasons",I want to say "You can't boast about four seasons if you don't know how to drive/walk in one of them! " It's snow,you know it's going to happen ,be prepared for it .

haha, truth.

I heard that businesses are responsible for taking care of the sidewalk/street immediately outside their doors. I wonder if that means liability, also. Yesterday I almost wiped out coming down from the subway station on the slick, slush-covered floor.

If I break my head open-- is the gov't at fault? Can I sue? haha I wonder.

This ain't no "I spilled my hot coffee on my lap give me a $$ million bucks" kind of society.
I felt sorry for myself because I had no shoes-- until I met a man with no feet.


  • namerae
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    • September 26, 2011, 09:38:41 am
    • Anyang, South Korea
Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2012, 08:51:39 am »
Every year I contemplate going to market, buying some sacks of salt, and then just salting each path I need to walk on.  One to the bus stop from my apartment, one from the bus stop to my school, and maybe one to the market.

This is so me. I think I might actually do it, too. Darn slick sidewalks!  >:(


  • kiwityke
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    • October 20, 2011, 07:51:05 am
    • Gimpo, South Korea
Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #23 on: December 07, 2012, 10:27:24 am »
I saw a truck salting the roads just this morning and when it snowed on Wednesday a snow plow was plowing and salting as it went. SO erm they do salt the roads in Korea!!!


  • LemonWater
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    • September 09, 2010, 10:45:32 am
    • Gwangju
Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2012, 10:32:57 am »
Salting roads is also terrible for the environment. With a country as small as Korea, where every spare square foot of land is used for growing food, salting everything could be disastrous. Plus, The cold spills don't last very long here. Usually, it warms enough to melt everything within a day or two, so salting is kind of a waste. Same goes for plowing. Rarely is there enough snow that would impede a car from going through, and it doesn't last. By the time you would finish plowing all the streets, the snow is likely to have melted.

Sand is better for the environment, cheaper, and helps the ice melt faster, albeit not as fast as ice.

I used snow tires back in Canada and they really make a difference, but they can be expensive. If you use them for driving on a dry road, they increase fuel consumption, make steering more difficult, and go bald faster. For the few days they might be useful in Korea, I don't think they're worth the expense.

That said, they should  at least salt the pedestrian bridges and some walks. Yesterday a student slipped in front of my school and broke two teeth. . . . On the plus side, people here are not "sue crazy" filing lawsuits against property owners for something that's their own fault.


Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2012, 11:17:25 am »
I apologize if this is slightly off-topic. 

I have nothing to add as to why Koreans do or don't ice/sand their surfaces during what many of may perceive as inclement weather.  I'm from Texas and it does NOT snow like this where I am from, so for me walking to work has become a trek of treachery.  I still love the snow though!  That said, I am fascinated by the fact that so many of my students can walk to school with nothing more than their Converse tennis shoes and never slip.  Not once!  Some of them even run!  I have these gigantic boots and still walk like a weirdo. 


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    • August 30, 2011, 08:16:12 am
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Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2012, 11:34:03 am »
I apologize if this is slightly off-topic. 

I have nothing to add as to why Koreans do or don't ice/sand their surfaces during what many of may perceive as inclement weather.  I'm from Texas and it does NOT snow like this where I am from, so for me walking to work has become a trek of treachery.  I still love the snow though!  That said, I am fascinated by the fact that so many of my students can walk to school with nothing more than their Converse tennis shoes and never slip.  Not once!  Some of them even run!  I have these gigantic boots and still walk like a weirdo.

Practice Practice Practice. You'll get it down.


  • loumac
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    • March 10, 2011, 12:55:03 pm
    • Yesan, Chungnam
Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2012, 04:54:45 pm »
I saw a truck salting the roads just this morning and when it snowed on Wednesday a snow plow was plowing and salting as it went. SO erm they do salt the roads in Korea!!!

SO erm . . . thanks for that! I stand corrected!!!

I've just never seen them salting the roads in my time here. In saying that, I walked a long way back from my Friday school today which is out in the countryside and the roads were pretty good . . . well the main highways anyway. In the Eup, where I live, it's is still pretty patchy. Having a fresh layer of snow to walk on made it easier to walk on the sidewalks.

@ LemonWater. I guess salting the roads would be really bad for the environment. They spray tonnes of the stuff on the roads in Scotland, where I'm from, so that's probably not such a good thing. It's pretty expensive, too from what I recall.


Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #28 on: December 09, 2012, 03:41:02 pm »
I've often wondered about this when I see so many car accidents here, caused by compacted snow and ice + careless driving, of course. The roads are routinely gritted/treated where I come from.

I've heard that they don't galvanize the steel on cars in Korea, which is why, but I'm not sure if that's true or not.

Nothing here except a little sand on a very steep hill. I don't get it... it's so slippery... cars are flying all over... I saw two accidents on friday just between about 3 PM and 5 PM and multiple people slip including myself on the 7 minute walk home. A little salt would not be out of line. My co-teacher said they do salt the roads but they don't always make it to our out-of-the-way area quickly and it remains slippery longer.


  • lotte world
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Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #29 on: December 09, 2012, 03:44:02 pm »
In my town we have two gritting lorries with snowploughs on the front.  They are used when it snows (such as this weekend).

So, the roads *are* treated when it snows in Korea.

Next question please.


  • lotte world
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Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2012, 07:14:50 pm »
Gyeongnam.


  • Frozencat99
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Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #31 on: December 09, 2012, 11:38:27 pm »
Gyeongnam.

I live in a city in one of the northern provinces, and when it snows the roads don't get plowed until it stops snowing and even then, it takes the city a couple days to get rid of most of the snow. In fact, most is removed by cars driving over it. The sidewalks are cleared by shop owners. I've seen sand thrown down but rarely salt. Every year I see people driving their cars on icy roads, sliding into the curb, lamp posts, other cars. I've also seen plenty of delivery guys on scooters wipe out while taking a corner. I've seen the occasional pedestrian slip on the sidewalks. 

But technically speaking, you're right. The roads ARE treated. But that's a very vague statement. It's like saying, "Koreans speak English." Also true.


That's weird. I live in a northern town and the major roads are plowed and sanded regularly (not salted but considering half of the town is rice I'm quite glad it's sanded). Sidewalks are still cleared by shop owners here (or by the stationed military), though.

<Edit: quoted wrong person>
« Last Edit: December 10, 2012, 09:10:03 am by Frozencat99 »
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  • loumac
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    • March 10, 2011, 12:55:03 pm
    • Yesan, Chungnam
Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #32 on: December 10, 2012, 08:17:27 am »
In my town we have two gritting lorries with snowploughs on the front.  They are used when it snows (such as this weekend).

So, the roads *are* treated when it snows in Korea.

Next question please.

Yeah, you're right. My original post was probably a bit too general . . . and it certainly varies depending on where you live from what I've read. It was meant as a relevant topic though. It's interesting to find out about the differences in other parts of the country.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2012, 08:27:02 am by loumac »


  • Canonite
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Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #33 on: December 10, 2012, 07:11:08 pm »
I live down south (Changwon), where it's not as big a problem as farther up north, so I haven't seen any treatment (most of the roads didn't warrant it), but this morning driving to work I have to go on an elevated section (kind of like a looooooong bridge to bypass a small town). As some of you may know, bridges are especially susceptible to icing because the wind cools the road surface from above and below, instead of it being somewhat insulated from below, like a normal road is.

Well, on that road I saw what remained of sanding from when the snow fell...it's not much, but apparently they're making SOME efforts to make the roads safer.
*click*


Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #34 on: December 10, 2012, 07:17:12 pm »
I've bought myself some snow chains for my feet from Mont Bell. I look like a total pillock but I'm more concerned with staying upright on the sidewalk. They are my new best friend.  ;D


  • Canonite
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Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #35 on: December 10, 2012, 10:29:58 pm »
I've bought myself some snow chains for my feet from Mont Bell. I look like a total pillock but I'm more concerned with staying upright on the sidewalk. They are my new best friend.  ;D

lolz..."pillock"...that's a new one...so gonna start using it!!! :D
*click*


  • macchiato
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    • October 25, 2011, 12:17:22 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Why aren't the roads treated when it snows in Korea?
« Reply #36 on: December 11, 2012, 02:13:07 pm »
I was having this conversation with my boyfriend the other day. We were sitting in his car talking about the lack of salt on the roads and just how dangerous it was... and what happens next? A huge truck comes rolling past us flinging salt at our windscreen.

So it does happen, but I don't think its quite as prominent as back in the west. However I am more concerned about the pedestrianized shopping street near me that has been a sheet of ice for the past week now. I have a feeling it will probably remain that way until springtime unless someone gets around to clearing it. :(