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  • ecoecho
  • Adventurer

    • 25

    • March 10, 2011, 12:20:31 am
    • Republic of Korea
Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« on: November 29, 2012, 12:50:14 pm »
A few minutes ago, my elementary co-teacher asked me if I could edit "this" for her. It's two chapters from an upcoming textbook, a job that she is getting paid to do by other textbook authors.

I told her that as she is getting paid to do this, I don't want to do it for her and then not get compensated. She then said that she would pay me to edit for her. She didn't say how much, and I have no idea what would be fair. I asked her how much she was getting paid for this editing job, and she said that she didn't know.

But as she had to skip off to class, I'm sitting her wondering what to do.

I'd really appreciate any advice, like should I even bother? If so, what would be fair compensation? Or, really, isn't this against my contract and I shouldn't bother on that point alone?

Thank you.


  • RobOak
  • Waygookin

    • 16

    • March 02, 2012, 10:34:43 am
    • Seongnam city, Bundang Seoul
    more
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2012, 01:17:19 pm »
I don't think it would be against your contract.  If you are happy to get paid and her still get the credit, then take the money. However, I think I would be looking to be credited in the book. I doubt you would get any extra income, unless it is the best book ever written. However it would be an awesome thing to put on your CV (Resume) - I bet she will be putting it on hers!!!! And if you are doing the work you deserve that 'token' credit, at least!


Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2012, 01:20:50 pm »
It's almost certainly against your contract (no work outside of your school) and your visa conditions if you're on an E2 (only allowed to teach at accredited institutions, and even then you have to get permission from your employer and notify immigration if you're teaching at a 2nd job).
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.


  • Deesh
  • Super Waygook

    • 250

    • April 01, 2011, 02:22:10 pm
    • Gyeonggi-do
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2012, 03:39:52 pm »
I'd really appreciate any advice, like should I even bother? If so, what would be fair compensation?

I did something similar a couple of years ago and was paid 500,000, plus my name in the book. I didn't know the going rate either - I suggested 500,000 (for about 10 hours work) and it was agreed to. So I guess 'fair compensation' is really just whatever you're happy with.



  • newb
  • Newgookin

    • 0

    • November 20, 2012, 10:38:27 am
    • South Korea
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2012, 03:43:40 pm »
Is your co-t fair and nice to you?

If so, I'd advise you to do it for free, but conditioned upon approval by your principal.  Editing the text book wouldn't be that hard to do.  Plus, you'd get some brownie points from your principal for helping your co-teacher.  Once you have the head master on your side, your life will be alot easier and solid. 

Oh, and ask your co-t to buy you a nice dinner.
HEY CAN YOU FILL THE OIL AND CHECK THE GAS PLEASE!!!!


  • cruisemonkey
  • Expert Waygook

    • 853

    • March 25, 2011, 02:17:57 pm
    • China
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Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2012, 04:37:31 pm »
I'd do it for free - changing every 'then' to 'than' and all capital letters to lower case;  leave out all punctuation; and figure out how to insert the word 're-sign' (without the hyphen).
The Ks once gave me five minutes notice. I didn't know what to do with the extra time.


  • mycena
  • Veteran

    • 193

    • May 08, 2011, 10:59:19 am
    • Masan
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2012, 06:03:28 pm »
Editing the text book wouldn't be that hard to do.
Have you ever professionally edited before? Because I have, and it's actually quite difficult, especially for more technical material. OP, if I were you, I'd do what the other posters have suggested and just tell her you can't do it on your visa. Or I'd ask for the going rate of 40,000-50,000 an hour.


  • lotte world
  • The Legend

    • 2272

    • August 22, 2011, 09:00:38 pm
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Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2012, 07:23:45 pm »
It depends on whether you want to do it or not.

If you do, then do it (for free, or paid, it doesn't matter).  If you do it for free then you might get a ton of brownie points, but you've probably squandered that opportunity now.

If you don't, then don't.  You could use your visa as an excuse, or you could just say no.


  • newb
  • Newgookin

    • 0

    • November 20, 2012, 10:38:27 am
    • South Korea
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2012, 07:41:21 pm »
Editing the text book wouldn't be that hard to do.
Have you ever professionally edited before? Because I have, and it's actually quite difficult, especially for more technical material. OP, if I were you, I'd do what the other posters have suggested and just tell her you can't do it on your visa. Or I'd ask for the going rate of 40,000-50,000 an hour.

Yes, I have edited technical and legal.  I am assuming the op is talking about elementary school english textbook.  Have you ever seen Korean elementary school english textbook? 

As I said, it would not be that hard to edit one.  I'd be able to edit an entire book in an hour or less.
HEY CAN YOU FILL THE OIL AND CHECK THE GAS PLEASE!!!!


  • skippy
  • Expert Waygook

    • 873

    • January 12, 2011, 04:08:17 pm
    • Daejeon
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Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2012, 09:43:43 pm »
It depends...

One how much work it is.  I mean is this a simple edit run through, pick up her mistakes, circle some thing, point out a few changes to do. And could be done in an hour or less.  If it is, then I would do it for favor/gratitude.  Some scut work at times can help in the job political arena.  Just make sure you are not being used, more on that later.

Or is it hell on paper.  Is it a thing of mucked up nonsense, Korean grammar arrangement and bastardized google translation cut and paste job  Which f you do will take and and hours of translating.  Plus add in trying to figure out what somethings really mean.   Then revisions and more revisions.  Maybe even some extra document editing and formatting.  So you get to edit, design, and type in a bunch of notes. If it is this case,  I would not do it without recompense. Which is illegal to do if you are an E-2.

One little thing I noticed, is the yaya move.  NET says they will edit but wants some money.  Teacher yayas.  She said she would pay, but forgets(intentionally?) the important part of mentioning a price.  COT hands NET the work and goes on her way (in a supposed rush).   I would not be surprised later when she comes back for finished work, takes said work and then does one of the following

  • Forgets to pay and promises a (yaya) payment for he future.  Which never comes.
  • Pays a pittance or less. ie "Oh thanks, here is my left over kimbap for you."
  • Acts hurt and surprised that you would charge a FRIEND money for your help.
  • Assumed you will do it for free as well you are her underling.
  • Does not care and just wants it now.  Threats or bullying ensue.

Do not promise anything.  Actually tell her now that unless you get some details nailed down, you will not do the work.  She might just assume that by taking you have given consent.  Do not let things fester if you can.  If she is a good friend or work ally then as a nice gesture doing it cheap or free.   If they are not, then get what is coming to you.

Good Luck
« Last Edit: November 29, 2012, 11:05:32 pm by skippy »
Please consider adding some info to your "Personal Text"  Like type of school, visa status, county of origin.  These little bits of info can help people help you.


Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2012, 05:50:43 am »



Hmmm. I thought that would automatically shrink to fit on the screen. Here's a link.


http://i.imgur.com/Lsa9o.jpg

^^^ HAHAHAHAHAHA! That is the most brilliant thing I've seen all week.

I was in a similar situation to the OP; many moons ago, my co-teacher asked me to edit a couple of chapters for her and I did so without even thinking about asking for money, because she'd helped me so much in so many ways.  Even if she hadn't, I probably wouldn't have thought of asking for money.  Editing a couple of chapters of an elementary textbook really shouldn't take that long, and if it does, you've got more problems than you think. 

I guess if my co-teacher was a passive-aggressive, nasty piece of work I probably wouldn't have done it though.


  • papayapie
  • Super Waygook

    • 421

    • May 30, 2012, 10:30:06 am
    more
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #11 on: November 30, 2012, 11:40:21 am »
Dudes, I wasn't even aware elementary school textbooks have enough words to need to be edited  :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: No, seriously though. For two pages of a fourth grade book there might be like 15 words. Elementary school books = all pics.

I wouldn't do it unless she was gonna pay me well. Whether or not you get credit for it, whatevs. You can still put on your resume that you edited a Korean textbook used for elementary students across the country. Heck, I could put that down and I can bet a million bucks none of my future employers are going to bother to check if it's true or not.


  • boeta777
  • Veteran

    • 121

    • June 10, 2011, 12:23:30 pm
    • korea
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #12 on: November 30, 2012, 11:40:53 am »
 :cry:
How do you lioke this one? 
I helped a former ct of mine to do the same thing..edit a textbook , helped to write a speech for a conference and she ended up with a 3 month long 'education trip' to Denmark! :cry:


  • ecoecho
  • Adventurer

    • 25

    • March 10, 2011, 12:20:31 am
    • Republic of Korea
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #13 on: November 30, 2012, 01:14:55 pm »
Hello all.

Thank you so much for your responses. They have broadened my outlook on this issue immensely. I assumed that people have had similar experiences, but it's nice to read your concrete advice based on personal experience.

In the end, I declined to do the editing. I was respectful about it, and she didn't seem upset as much as bewildered.

I didn't do it mainly because there was a considerable amount of text to edit in this 6th grade elementary teacher's guide because the authors are incorporating the TEE concept (Teaching English in English). I know; only in Korea is this novel.  So, more than usual, everything was spelled out in English. I did glance at it and found many errors immediately.

Oh, and I'm sorry that I hadn't mention before that it was the teacher's guide portion. A big omission, I realize. Hence why I was incredulous about her request.

She also said that I had to finish editing in two hours to meet her deadline, meanwhile giving me no notice. Incidently, she has been an incredibly dishonest and unkind coworker. As skippy mentioned, I wholeheartedly assumed it would be yet another "yaya" situation.

I didn't know the going rate was 40,000-50,000 won!? And I found it incredibly strange that she didn't know how much she was getting paid for this job. You don't forget that you're getting paid 40,000-50,000 won an hour, right?

Again, thanks everyone. If I ever find myself in this situation again, I'll know how to better respond.

I think this thread serves as a big word to the wise, too.


  • Deesh
  • Super Waygook

    • 250

    • April 01, 2011, 02:22:10 pm
    • Gyeonggi-do
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2012, 01:43:55 pm »
Under those circumstances, declining was the wise thing to do.


  • skippy
  • Expert Waygook

    • 873

    • January 12, 2011, 04:08:17 pm
    • Daejeon
    more
Re: Co-teacher asked me to edit an upcoming textbook for her
« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2012, 02:36:46 pm »
Hello all.
In the end, I declined to do the editing. I was respectful about it, and she didn't seem upset as much as bewildered.

but, but, bit.... I thought we were friends!



I didn't do it mainly because there was a considerable amount of text to edit in this 6th grade elementary teacher's guide because the authors are incorporating the TEE concept (Teaching English in English). I know; only in Korea is this novel.  So, more than usual, everything was spelled out in English. I did glance at it and found many errors immediately.

Oh, and I'm sorry that I hadn't mention before that it was the teacher's guide portion. A big omission, I realize. Hence why I was incredulous about her request.

Thanks, sometimes detail are important.  Still you wrote a great post and question.   Do better next time! :P

Quote
She also said that I had to finish editing in two hours to meet her deadline, meanwhile giving me no notice.

If pressure is given, then guess what?  It will be a definite no!  Drives me nuts how so many Koreans do not get the simple idea of, "Hey! Let's get this done early".    More so if I want something done properly get it done ahead of time.  If you want someone to help you (maybe for free)  then adding in time pressure does not help.

Quote
Incidently, she has been an incredibly dishonest and unkind coworker. As skippy mentioned, I wholeheartedly assumed it would be yet another "yaya" situation.

Yep, she sucks at the political game and now she wants some cred or work for nothing.  Hey, I help friends.  People who screw with me get nothing, well maybe a malicious laugh.
Yep, the good old yaya routine.   Give them some work and leave before they can refuse.   People need to see this move and learn to be not abused by it.  Actually thinking about it, this should be common.  If anybody hands you something to do.  Say NO!   When they ask why not?   No proper request was made.  There is a right way.  If a person can not take a couple a minutes to stop and properly ask make a request.  Provide details like detail, what is needed.   Unless your direct boss is asking or the thing to do is YOUR job, say NO.

Quote
I didn't know the going rate was 40,000-50,000 won!? And I found it incredibly strange that she didn't know how much she was getting paid for this job. You don't forget that you're getting paid 40,000-50,000 won an hour, right?

There is no real set price.   Well their might be professional rate, but you are not like a set professional.  People can charge what ever they want.  The key is to haggle and find a happy medium.

Something like this happened to me recently.   A coworker ask if I could help look at an edit job.   This was for some engineering company pamphlet filled with touch of technical stuff.   The more I looked, the more I saw lots of work.  I did not mind helping.  I liked her.  Two things annoyed me
 through.

  • What she though might be simple was actually quite a lot of work?
  • She gave this to me and asked if it could be done quickly as it was needed in a two days.

With some proper planning she could have easily got me to do this for FREE.  One give me a heads up that she may ask.  Give me a clue onto what the work might be.  Two,  give me time and no pressure, well a little. 

To the OP, I was going to recommend that you could still help her for free/favor.  You would give some time when you had it.  Maybe you had twenty minutes on a break time and you could do some simple circling.  It might even help if she was their sometimes to see what was wrong.  A little time here and some there, the work would get done.  Yet when she is someone who has built no rep to deserve this and gives a ridiculous deadline.  NO.  You did the right thing.

Good Luck, please let us know of any follow up.
Please consider adding some info to your "Personal Text"  Like type of school, visa status, county of origin.  These little bits of info can help people help you.